Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Huge HOA fee

Notices
Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Huge HOA fee

Old 01-09-18, 05:20 AM
  #1  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Huge HOA fee

So I got a letter from the HOA today that we need a very expensive landslide mitigation project, so we are to vote whether to do it, at a cost of almost $5K/unit. Our townhouse complex has 72 units in 15 buildings, and only 2 of the buildings are in need of the work. If we vote no, then it will (may?) cost (more?) later. Since my building is one of the two that might slide down the hill, I have a personal interest in voting for my neighbors to bail me out, but it's really not a good time to cough up that much extra dough (when is?)!

I have no idea if the majority of a quorum of owners will vote in favor of paying $5k that helps a few neighbors but does nothing for themselves. We'll find out in a few weeks.

But I was under the impression that it's not 'my' problem; as a condo/townhouse 'owner', I only actually own 'from the paint in', and all structural/roofing/land issues are the responsibility of the true owners of the land/structures (which I guess is the HOA? the business entity which is 'the complex'? Is there a difference?), and their insurance.

Is this standard for the hoa to expect everybody to cough up a huge payment like this? Or are they just hoping they can convince all the units to pay for repairs out of a sense of urgency?
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 05:48 AM
  #2  
ahsposo 
Rock Hard Member
 
ahsposo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Outside the Box
Posts: 7,134

Bikes: A Home Built All Rounder, Bianchi 928, Specialized Langster, Dahon Folder

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5219 Post(s)
Liked 2,345 Times in 1,410 Posts
If your neighbors don't help take care of it their property value may suffer in excess of the proposed assessment when your ass goes sliding down the hill.

If they don't help they better have immediate plans to sell.
ahsposo is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 06:14 AM
  #3  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 24,969
Mentioned: 202 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13453 Post(s)
Liked 1,804 Times in 1,366 Posts
Interesting question.

A developer buys land.
Builds a bunch of row houses.
Then sells them all off individually.

I presume your local housing association is left with mowing the lawns and maintaining the common land.

So, if there was a dead snag of a tree, the housing association would pay to have the tree removed no matter who's house it is closest to.

In this case, this is also maintaining the property/site, so it should fall back on the housing association.

How old is your development? < 10 years old? > 50 years old? If it is a relatively new development, perhaps the original builder/developer would still retain some amount of liability for the plot development. So, if this is a fault of the builder, then one recourse might be to go back and have the original building contractor fix it.

Potentially even a legal battle which could be costly if you lose.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 11:28 AM
  #4  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Good questions.

HOA is responsible for all landscaping, the pool, the parking lot paving, and all exterior structural repairs (roofing, paint, rotted exterior paneling, etc). So yes, HOA would have to take out a dead tree, or make repairs if a tree falls and does damage.

HOA fees also include water, but not electric/gas. Complex was built in the mid-90s.

What I'm not clear on though, if it is correct that I truly only own from the paint in (not even the sheetrock), then who owns the structures and the land? Is it the HOA? Or the original developer or subsequent entities the developer might have sold to? Or does the HOA own it, meaning it is co-owned by me and all my neighbors?
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 12:05 PM
  #5  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 294 Posts
We've got a structural problem at my condo that is estimated to cost $5k/unit to correct. Whenever someone brings up the problem, they're shouted down by others who don't want to spend the $ and nothing happens.

In Illinois, the condo owners association owns the common elements, things like the parking lots, hallways, laundry facilities etc as well as the land. As an owner, you own a portion of everything the association owns. Your monthly assessment is probably based on your %age of ownership.
no motor? is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 12:21 PM
  #6  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
We've got a structural problem at my condo that is estimated to cost $5k/unit to correct. Whenever someone brings up the problem, they're shouted down by others who don't want to spend the $ and nothing happens.
Wow based on that precedent, it seems there's no chance in hell this will get approved, as almost 90% of the units are not affected by the problem. Maybe I don't have to worry about the $5K charge, but only have to worry about if (when) my building slides down the hill.

Is getting an insurance payout easier than selling a house? I'm not sure the risk to life&limb involved, it's like a 10-15-foot little hillside down to the parking in the lot next door. Hopefully before it gets to that point, inspectors would condemn the building as unsafe and trigger insurance that way?
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 01:10 PM
  #7  
mconlonx 
Str*t*gic *quivoc*tor
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,552
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7068 Post(s)
Liked 74 Times in 52 Posts
Hopefully, in some file on your end somewhere, you have a copy of the HOA agreement that you signed onto when you bought the place. Best thing to do would be to bring it to a lawyer and pay them to figure out who is responsible for what in this situation.
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 01:32 PM
  #8  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 294 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Is getting an insurance payout easier than selling a house? I'm not sure the risk to life&limb involved, it's like a 10-15-foot little hillside down to the parking in the lot next door. Hopefully before it gets to that point, inspectors would condemn the building as unsafe and trigger insurance that way?
I have no idea of the answers to those questions.
no motor? is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 02:22 PM
  #9  
jimincalif
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 2,307

Bikes: '96 Trek 850, '08 Specialized Roubaix Comp, '18 Niner RLT RDO

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 563 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 66 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Is getting an insurance payout easier than selling a house? I'm not sure the risk to life&limb involved, it's like a 10-15-foot little hillside down to the parking in the lot next door. Hopefully before it gets to that point, inspectors would condemn the building as unsafe and trigger insurance that way?
Damage due to landslides is almost never covered by regular homeowners insurance.

Interesting that it is going to a vote. If the HOA is responsible for the structures, it seems to me the HOA would have a fiduciary duty to fix a problem that it is now aware of, and should it not fix the problem and a loss occurs, those affected would have a cause of action against the HOA.

But I am not a lawyer. Presumably the HOA has received legal advice on this. Good luck.
jimincalif is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 03:06 PM
  #10  
leob1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Middle of the road, NJ
Posts: 3,084
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 269 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 39 Posts
Reason to never live in a place with a HOA.
Or California.
leob1 is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 03:10 PM
  #11  
andr0id
Senior Member
 
andr0id's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,522
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1422 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post

But I was under the impression that it's not 'my' problem; as a condo/townhouse 'owner', I only actually own 'from the paint in', and all structural/roofing/land issues are the responsibility of the true owners of the land/structures (which I guess is the HOA? the business entity which is 'the complex'? Is there a difference?), and their insurance.

Is this standard for the hoa to expect everybody to cough up a huge payment like this? Or are they just hoping they can convince all the units to pay for repairs out of a sense of urgency?
It is typical of a condo HOA. You own your interior with regards to services and repairs within your wall, so you personally write that check to the plumber for instance. But the HOA can decide to fix or improve something and bill you as a joint owner of the buildings and property.
andr0id is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 03:11 PM
  #12  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
Damage due to landslides is almost never covered by regular homeowners insurance.
I know that HOA has insurance apart from my own homehowner's insurance, presumably (hopefully) their bulk policy for the whole complex is not 'regular'.

This is all very helpful, you guys are arming me with the right questions for the pitchfork-laden-mob ... ahem ... HOA meeting scheduled in a few days to discuss this prior to submitting ballots.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 04:39 PM
  #13  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 24,969
Mentioned: 202 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13453 Post(s)
Liked 1,804 Times in 1,366 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Wow based on that precedent, it seems there's no chance in hell this will get approved, as almost 90% of the units are not affected by the problem. Maybe I don't have to worry about the $5K charge, but only have to worry about if (when) my building slides down the hill.

Is getting an insurance payout easier than selling a house? I'm not sure the risk to life&limb involved, it's like a 10-15-foot little hillside down to the parking in the lot next door. Hopefully before it gets to that point, inspectors would condemn the building as unsafe and trigger insurance that way?
If you go to a meeting with the homeowners association, and presumably you are in favor of the repairs, even though it is a big expense for you.

Then point out that the homeowners association owns the framework of the units at risk. Thus, damage to your condo would have to be rebuilt by the homeowners association, or you would have to be reimbursed/bought out at fair market value.

So, if this risk is real, then either do the upgrades now, or wait and do the upgrades, and repair the entire building later. Bonus for you, a new condo

This sounds little different from say roof repair to prevent damage to the underlying structure.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 05:49 PM
  #14  
ahsposo 
Rock Hard Member
 
ahsposo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Outside the Box
Posts: 7,134

Bikes: A Home Built All Rounder, Bianchi 928, Specialized Langster, Dahon Folder

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5219 Post(s)
Liked 2,345 Times in 1,410 Posts
I live in a very small gated community, houses not condos. We have some issues with a small area and we are currently trying to have the developer address them. All in all, though, the HOA is not burdensome. Most households participate in the occasional meeting, problems get fixed. The common areas look great and our property on market sells quickly and for a premium. HOAs aren't all bad.
ahsposo is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 06:12 PM
  #15  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 294 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
I know that HOA has insurance apart from my own homehowner's insurance, presumably (hopefully) their bulk policy for the whole complex is not 'regular'.

This is all very helpful, you guys are arming me with the right questions for the pitchfork-laden-mob ... ahem ... HOA meeting scheduled in a few days to discuss this prior to submitting ballots.
I just got a copy of the bill for the association insurance today for 2018 coverage for a 40 unit condo complex with grounds, and it's just over $14k for the year. That's coverage for everything we have, and the large print giveth and the small print taketh away here just like everywhere else. Counting on insurance to bail you out later would not be a good idea in my humble impression from behind a keyboard several states away.
no motor? is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 06:19 PM
  #16  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 294 Posts
Another thing I should have mentioned, the fee can be spread out over time. We're in the process of being forced by the city to make install an expensive fire alarm system. Since it should last for years, the cost will be spread out for years to minimize the initial expenses. Depending on the financial strength of your HOA, this should be considered.
no motor? is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 06:38 PM
  #17  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Yes, the letter said (if approved by vote), the fee would be spread out in payments starting in April. Presumably monthly, although the letter didn't actually specify. If it was annually, I'd say that's not too bad.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 09:19 PM
  #18  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,429

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4014 Post(s)
Liked 1,827 Times in 1,168 Posts
San Diego is beautiful with a perfect climate. Sometimes I regret not buying a home there and staying after I finished my Navy tour in 1981. Houses were still affordable in some communities.

But I always worried about the potential for landslides in some of the elevated scenic areas. And wildfires. Most of California is unfit for human habitation on such a massive scale without a lot of human intervention to beat nature into submission.

I had a feeling back in 1978 that Prop 13 would lead to trouble for the entire state. And it did.

Regarding the HOA fees, you're mostly looking at the same conundrum most municipalities face with taxpayers. People want good streets, safe neighborhoods, police and fire protection, good schools. And they don't want to pay for it. They think it just magically happens.

Or if they do approve higher taxes, fees, etc., it doesn't always end up fixing the problems taxpayers had in mind. Their streets are still bombed out. So instead of supporting more specific revenue increases to pay for that specific problem, voters go insane and support massive tax cuts or no tax increases to retaliate against... whatever. Yup, that'll fix 'em.

So I moved to a rural home in Texas with no zoning, no utilities other than telephone (just one step above party lines) and electricity (an outrageously expensive co-op). Property prices and houses seemed cheap, but you had to factor in the cost for water wells, septic tanks, and continually managing the landscape to avoid minor floods and erosion.

Emergency repairs only happen in the worst weather. Roof damage from hailstorms. Burst pipes from unusually heavy freezes. Water in the front entrance because a nutria or other critter dug up the berms you built to redirect runoff water toward the lake.

Then without zoning your property is never likely to appreciate in value because your neighbors have three or four ramshackle storage barns larger than their living quarters, all spilling over with kipple, and a dozens junked cars, motorcycles and boats on blocks in the yard.

Law enforcement is minimal, mostly consisting of occasional drive-throughs by deputies from the sheriff's department 25 miles away at the county seat. So every few years the meth labs move through town before being swept out by the latest task force effort. Then the town decides it's a good idea to hire a marshal or constable, which lasts for a few months until they realize the only guy they could afford to hire was an ex-con and drug dealer who used his patrol car as a freebooter's schooner for highway piracy, and beat the crap out of the mayor for trying to fire him.

On the plus side, fortunately our house was far enough from the lakefront that major flooding wasn't a realistic danger. In more than 40 years the house never flooded, even when the lake moved up from 100 yards away to 10 feet away.

See, you could do a lot worse than HOA expenses.

Last edited by canklecat; 01-09-18 at 09:22 PM. Reason: ficks tie-pohs
canklecat is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 09:28 PM
  #19  
Chukbacca
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 97

Bikes: 1988 Univega Alpina Pro

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
So I got a letter from the HOA today that we need a very expensive landslide mitigation project, so we are to vote whether to do it, at a cost of almost $5K/unit. Our townhouse complex has 72 units in 15 buildings, and only 2 of the buildings are in need of the work. If we vote no, then it will (may?) cost (more?) later. Since my building is one of the two that might slide down the hill, I have a personal interest in voting for my neighbors to bail me out, but it's really not a good time to cough up that much extra dough (when is?)!

I have no idea if the majority of a quorum of owners will vote in favor of paying $5k that helps a few neighbors but does nothing for themselves. We'll find out in a few weeks.

But I was under the impression that it's not 'my' problem; as a condo/townhouse 'owner', I only actually own 'from the paint in', and all structural/roofing/land issues are the responsibility of the true owners of the land/structures (which I guess is the HOA? the business entity which is 'the complex'? Is there a difference?), and their insurance.

Is this standard for the hoa to expect everybody to cough up a huge payment like this? Or are they just hoping they can convince all the units to pay for repairs out of a sense of urgency?
Special Assessments suck, putting aside the physical cost factor the fact that an association has chosen to use special assessments will negatively affect values. Personally, if I were on the board, I would advise a SIGNIFICANT dues increase for two reasons.

The first, there's obviously not enough reserves. Raising dues will both fund the repair as well as correct the reserves for the long run. As an example, raising dues $100 per month would raise the $5k per unit in just over four years and allow for the reserves to be funded adequately in future years.

The second reason is, it's not an assessment. In my opinion, an assessment shows a lack of planning on the board's part; as a potential buyer, I would rather see higher dues, and no assessments.

There are a variety of ways that HOAs are handled. I can't recall all the official terms, but depending on how your HOA is filed will dictate how inclusive they are regarding repairs and upkeep. If you've never perused the site, I'd encourage you to explore https://www.davis-stirling.com/

I was on the board of a HOA that was funded to +/- 80% in their reserves which allowed them a great deal of freedom when unexpected or urgent matters came up. I suspect there were many items that they could have put onto the homeowner that they chose not to.

No one would ever go for the dues increase, and I wouldn't blame them...but personally I would rather see that than a special assessment.

Last edited by Chukbacca; 01-09-18 at 09:32 PM. Reason: I forgot something
Chukbacca is offline  
Old 01-09-18, 09:33 PM
  #20  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4362 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
.....

Is this standard for the hoa to expect everybody to cough up a huge payment like this? Or are they just hoping they can convince all the units to pay for repairs out of a sense of urgency?
Yes. While you're an individual "owner" of your interior, you're also an owner in common with your fellow owners of the entire complex. So it's 100% normal for every owner to share in all common property costs. Bylaws vary and some complexes will have all owners share equally, and others will allocate according to the same formula as the common fees.

One other way to think about this would be who would pay the interest if the complex took out bank financing to pay for a major repair like this. The interest would be built into the operating expenses the same as paint, landscaping or whatever, and you'd foot the bill.

If the outlay is a budget breaker for you, and maybe for some of your fellow owners, you might ask the HOA to seek some outside financing for at least a decent part of the bill, so you can spread the outlay over time.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 01-10-18, 09:52 AM
  #21  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by Chukbacca View Post
Special Assessments suck, putting aside the physical cost factor the fact that an association has chosen to use special assessments will negatively affect values. Personally, if I were on the board, I would advise a SIGNIFICANT dues increase for two reasons.

The first, there's obviously not enough reserves. Raising dues will both fund the repair as well as correct the reserves for the long run. As an example, raising dues $100 per month would raise the $5k per unit in just over four years and allow for the reserves to be funded adequately in future years.
HOA is proposing in this vote to use $100K of reserves, and raise the rest from the assessment. Dues are already quite high, about $400/mo; I've never heard of higher. That includes all the expected common-property stuff (landscaping, pool maintenance, parking lot upkeep, etc), and water. And these are not luxury condos, most of the units are is 3br/2.5ba/~1300 sq ft.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-10-18, 10:11 AM
  #22  
Ballenxj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 930

Bikes: Diamond Back Apex, Mongoose IBOC Aluminum Road Bike, SR road bike

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 484 Post(s)
Liked 113 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
So I got a letter from the HOA today that we need a very expensive landslide mitigation project, so we are to vote whether to do it, at a cost of almost $5K/unit. Our townhouse complex has 72 units in 15 buildings, and only 2 of the buildings are in need of the work. If we vote no, then it will (may?) cost (more?) later. Since my building is one of the two that might slide down the hill, I have a personal interest in voting for my neighbors to bail me out, but it's really not a good time to cough up that much extra dough (when is?)!

I have no idea if the majority of a quorum of owners will vote in favor of paying $5k that helps a few neighbors but does nothing for themselves. We'll find out in a few weeks.

But I was under the impression that it's not 'my' problem; as a condo/townhouse 'owner', I only actually own 'from the paint in', and all structural/roofing/land issues are the responsibility of the true owners of the land/structures (which I guess is the HOA? the business entity which is 'the complex'? Is there a difference?), and their insurance.

Is this standard for the hoa to expect everybody to cough up a huge payment like this? Or are they just hoping they can convince all the units to pay for repairs out of a sense of urgency?
The difference of definition I was given by a realtor is the actual name of what you own. If a condominium, then you own only what's inside the structure. If it's a Townhouse, you own your share of the structure, including the earth below it, so could be more of your problem than you want.
This really sounds like a job for an attorney that specializes in which ever you have. Make sure to bring a copy of your cc&r's with you.
As an aside, I truly hate HOA's, and will never live under their thumb again.
Ballenxj is offline  
Old 01-10-18, 10:12 AM
  #23  
Chukbacca
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 97

Bikes: 1988 Univega Alpina Pro

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
HOA is proposing in this vote to use $100K of reserves, and raise the rest from the assessment. Dues are already quite high, about $400/mo; I've never heard of higher. That includes all the expected common-property stuff (landscaping, pool maintenance, parking lot upkeep, etc), and water. And these are not luxury condos, most of the units are is 3br/2.5ba/~1300 sq ft.
Wow, quite a bummer. HOA fees go MUCH higher, trust me.

You might ask how many opinions and bids they have received; I know of numerous HOAs that paid through the nose for plausibly useful but certainly unneeded repairs due to a family member being a contractor. You might also inquire why the urgency, is it someone's opinion (get more opinions), is the HOA insurance company threatening termination?, etc

You can actually get Special Assessment insurance tacked onto your homeowners policy. I did it, as I recall it was absurdly inexpensive. It's probably too late for it this time, but should this be voted down you might consider it as it's likely to come up again.

If your reserves are not orbiting 80%, something is wrong (too much is being spent, too little is being put away for stuff like this, or too little is coming in).

Good luck!
Chukbacca is offline  
Old 01-10-18, 11:41 AM
  #24  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by Ballenxj View Post
The difference of definition I was given by a realtor is the actual name of what you own. If a condominium, then you own only what's inside the structure. If it's a Townhouse, you own your share of the structure, including the earth below it, so could be more of your problem than you want.
When we bought the place, we were told (by our mortgage broker) that we own 'from the paint in', so I guess from this legal standpoint it's a condominium. But in terms of construction style, I think of the units as townhouses. Each buildings is 4-6 units, and units are stacked only horizontally, not vertically -- we share walls, but we each have 2 or 3 levels from ground to roof. And no stacking back-to-back; we all have individual back patios.

Even though my patio is ridiculously small, one thing I like about being a middle unit in my building is the thermal insulation. I get to bonus off my neighbors' heating (and maybe a little AC). I'm not sure our heater has ever kicked on except to test it.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 01-10-18, 11:42 AM
  #25  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,430

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,109 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by Chukbacca View Post
You can actually get Special Assessment insurance tacked onto your homeowners policy. I did it, as I recall it was absurdly inexpensive. It's probably too late for it this time, but should this be voted down you might consider it as it's likely to come up again.
Wow, I've never heard of that! I will definitely be checking into that for us.
RubeRad is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.