Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Coffee Brewing

Old 11-13-18, 12:20 PM
  #51  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 938

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 593 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Cool! Poked around Sweet Maria's a little bit, I'll be keeping my eye out for a hot air popcorn popper at the thrift store!
I used a hot air popper for four years prior to getting a bonafide [drum] roaster. Ugh. So much time wasted. Consider how much coffee you go through. If you do like it enough to get a roaster, get one that can do a pound or more per batch. There are smaller roasters out there. Don't bother. Get one with more capacity---big time saver. FWIW, I have a Behmor 1600+. Do NOT buy a roaster off amazon. They're plagued with refurbs sold as new. Where as sellers like Burmans, SM's, etc sell roasters and include several sample (one pound) bags from various parts of the world to tinker with in the process of learning roasting. It isn't hard, but it does require some time and patience. Whether you do drip, pour-overs, Aeropress, French press, etc...home-roasting will up your game.
skijor is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 01:04 PM
  #52  
mconlonx 
Str*t*gic *quivoc*tor
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,551
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6967 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 26 Posts
At home:
- Eight O'Clock 100% Colombian whole bean
- Cuisinart burr grinder (cheapest we could find)
- Kitchenaid drip coffee maker. Color matches the mixer...

This is purely for the caffeine. Quick, set and forget. But long ago, I found that the most important key to decent (not good or great) coffee was fresh ground beans.

At work:
- local, small-batch coffee roaster bean coffee
- Hario burr hand grinder
- Melitta cone holder and filters
- Braun hot pot

Now we're talkin'! Pour-over, b****es! There are a few local places that get light and medium roasts right -- no space in my life for dark roast. The hand-grinder makes for a lower temperature and more uniform grind. I don't get anxious about water temp, so I bring it to boil, wait a few minutes and then pour. I use a filter in a cone holder over my mug. It's really enjoyable and almost meditative to prepare this way, and cuts down my indiscriminate swilling consumption of coffee, which at our office, would otherwise be K-cup. Yes, there is definitely a difference between the drip coffee at home and the pour-over I enjoy at work (good, not great). I've seen people get a bit precious, preparing pour-over -- cute, but not really necessary without a tipping audience.

Have tried and moved on from: french press (clean up) and aeropress (cleanup, proprietary filter disks).

Partner wants to get a Nespresso machine, and to its credit, it makes a mean cappucino with accessory frother... For a treat, I might enjoy a ghetto latte, which involves frothing milk utilizing a microwave and whisk...
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is online now  
Old 11-13-18, 01:13 PM
  #53  
dennis336
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 330

Bikes: Trek Domane, Surly Disc Trucker, Canondale Synapse (winter bike)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
I grind my own beans (DeLonghi burr grinder) and then French Press when I'm just making coffee for me. If we have company and I need to make several cups, I pull out the percolator.
dennis336 is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 01:29 PM
  #54  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,555

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 58 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by skijor View Post
I used a hot air popper for four years prior to getting a bonafide [drum] roaster. Ugh. So much time wasted. Consider how much coffee you go through.
At home, I make coffee for only for myself (wife hates coffee, teenagers are disinterested), only Saturday and/or Sunday mornings. I buy a bag of coffee once every 2-3 months, don't even know the size, 12oz maybe? Starting with a near-zero-$ investment in a thrift store air popper is the right way for me to experiment.

This coming from the guy who regularly brews 5gal batches of beer with probably less than $50 invested in gear (stove-top extract kits only, sparklett's water bottle fermenter, bottle-conditioning rather than kegging/carbonating, etc). I'm all about investing my time and energy rather than my money, if it's an activity that I enjoy.
RubeRad is online now  
Old 11-14-18, 10:49 AM
  #55  
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,752

Bikes: 2015 22 Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1495 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts


Does't always come out great... part of the fun...
McBTC is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 11:03 AM
  #56  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 938

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 593 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
At home:
Have tried and moved on from: french press (clean up) and aeropress (cleanup, proprietary filter disks).

Partner wants to get a Nespresso machine, and to its credit, it makes a mean cappucino with accessory frother... For a treat, I might enjoy a ghetto latte, which involves frothing milk utilizing a microwave and whisk...
There are reusable stainless disks of various porosity to suit your desired level of body.
E.g. https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Filt...EC2BHY63E8EGZR

It'd be nice to try machines like a Nespresso before buying. I hear the cup they produce leans towards the weak side. But to each their own. Aesthetically, I like their look. Nespresso machines use pods, much like the landfilling K-cups. Although there are reusable versions of both, I cannot imagine that either would be less putzy than a stainless mesh disk to rinse.
skijor is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 11:18 AM
  #57  
mconlonx 
Str*t*gic *quivoc*tor
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,551
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6967 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by skijor View Post
There are reusable stainless disks of various porosity to suit your desired level of body.
E.g. https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Filt...EC2BHY63E8EGZR

It'd be nice to try machines like a Nespresso before buying. I hear the cup they produce leans towards the weak side. But to each their own. Aesthetically, I like their look. Nespresso machines use pods, much like the landfilling K-cups. Although there are reusable versions of both, I cannot imagine that either would be less putzy than a stainless mesh disk to rinse.
For me, it's more about the cleanup, messy grounds. As much as you can tap them out into the trash or recycle bin, there's always enough left to be problematic. At least for me. Same reason I don't have a reusable filter for my Melitta drip unit and prefer cone filters.

I have a manual press LaPavoni at home, which makes an excellent espresso when you get things right, and also has the steam milk frother attached. Lovely unit, for sure. And I do know what decent espresso and cappucino should be. Which is why we will probably get a Nespresso machine at some point -- people we know have them and they make decent coffee. Apparently, the Nespresso cups are aluminum, recyclable, and you send them back in a postage-paid container so that they can be recycled.
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is online now  
Old 11-14-18, 11:51 AM
  #58  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 938

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 593 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
I have a manual press LaPavoni at home, which makes an excellent espresso when you get things right, and also has the steam milk frother attached. Lovely unit, for sure. And I do know what decent espresso and cappucino should be. Which is why we will probably get a Nespresso machine at some point -- people we know have them and they make decent coffee. Apparently, the Nespresso cups are aluminum, recyclable, and you send them back in a postage-paid container so that they can be recycled.
I also own a LP Europiccola, an '04...off ebay. Rebuilt it two years ago. It's the only espresso machine I've used. And equally important---it fits under my cupboards. Most of the semi-autos are too tall, not to mention far more costly and complicated. My kitchen is small enough the way it is.
skijor is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:14 PM
  #59  
GailT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Colorado
Posts: 204
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
I've been roasting my own coffee for nearly 20 years, and buying green beans from Sweet Maria's most of that time. They have a great selection of beans, and they work with small farmers. Benefits of roasting are that you can dial in the roast level to suit your preference, and you always have fresh roasted coffee. If you don't have a good local roaster, roasting your own beans probably has a bigger impact on the quality of your coffee than the brewing method.
GailT is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:51 PM
  #60  
rm -rf
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,087
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 624 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Roasting your own
I thought about doing it. Beans can be roasted to my taste, and it's less expensive. But: it appears that you really need to do it outside, there's smoke. How well does this work in the winter?

Grinders
Espresso needs precision grinding. The grinders can get very expensive.

For other coffee methods, this Bodum Bistro has good reviews, for consistent grinds and sturdiness. It's much quieter than my 20 year old Braun grinder, and much faster. It's more compact than some of the other grinders that I considered.

I have the approx $99 version. It has a borosilicate glass container, which really limits the static electricity problem with plastic containers -- the coffee grounds stick to everything by static charges.
It has a countdown timer, but I don't keep the hopper full, I use a measure or gram scale and just load it with today's coffee, then grind til it's empty. Easy grind adjustability with a dial ring.

I see there's now a $50 version for walmart, target, amazon etc. No timer, and a plastic container. But amazon reviews say it's grind is good.
rm -rf is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:56 PM
  #61  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 938

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 593 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
Roasting your own
I thought about doing it. Beans can be roasted to my taste, and it's less expensive. But: it appears that you really need to do it outside, there's smoke. How well does this work in the winter?
I use a Behmor 1600+, which has a smoke suppresor/afterburner. Some say it works ok for indoors, but I always roast either in my garage or just behind the garage. I've roasted in single digit temps. Some beans smoke more than others. It just varies.

Back when I used a hot air popcorn popper for roasting, I'd set the popper in a cardboard box and close off about half of the top. It was enough to conserve the heat and accomplish the roast fine...with no fires. Ha!
skijor is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 01:13 PM
  #62  
seedsbelize 
necessary illusions
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 11,302
Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4734 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 27 Posts
When I used to make drip coffee, I liked the chewy bits in the bottom of the cup. Now I use one of these (file wouldn't upload). It's a stovetop espresso maker. I use Coffea Robusta, which I buy online. One cup is enough, but on occasion I'll have a cup of room temperature instant in the afternoon.The method prevents the accumulation of chewables at the end. I have, however, in my severe addiction, been known to put a pinch between the cheek and gum, and gnaw on that for a few hours.
seedsbelize is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 04:12 PM
  #63  
coffeesnob
Senior Member
 
coffeesnob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Va
Posts: 443

Bikes: Trek DS 8.3 - cannondale M500

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2418 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by skijor View Post
I use a Behmor 1600+, which has a smoke suppresor/afterburner. Some say it works ok for indoors, but I always roast either in my garage or just behind the garage. I've roasted in single digit temps. Some beans smoke more than others. It just varies.

Back when I used a hot air popcorn popper for roasting, I'd set the popper in a cardboard box and close off about half of the top. It was enough to conserve the heat and accomplish the roast fine...with no fires. Ha!
I roast with the Behmor too. I roast mine in the garage year round. According to Behmor you are not supposed to roast outside and you should pay attention to voltage drops while roasting etc..The only think I notice roasting outside in the cold is that the second batch will roast quicker than the first for obvious reasons.
coffeesnob is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 04:16 PM
  #64  
coffeesnob
Senior Member
 
coffeesnob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Va
Posts: 443

Bikes: Trek DS 8.3 - cannondale M500

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2418 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
A decent modern electric grinder can do just fine. It just takes a bit of practice to get the constancy you want. Some have dials for texture (which gets you in the ball park), but its still pretty much a taste thing.

Also, I don't know about it being better -- its not that coffee houses can't make great coffee -- but making it yourself is without a doubt cheaper. Much, much, cheaper.
actually in a pinch macdonalds hs decent coffee when it is fresh and if you are 55 or over you get a senior discount.
coffeesnob is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 06:52 PM
  #65  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,174

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2813 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by coffeesnob View Post
actually in a pinch macdonalds hs decent coffee when it is fresh and if you are 55 or over you get a senior discount.
The first rule for any good coffee. Of all of fast food, MD has the best coffee by far. For years I wished that they offered it for sale in bags so I could make my own. They finally followed Duncan and Starbucks and made it available.

Now if they'd just offer the whole bean it would be my first stop. Although there are countless different gourmet blends, styles and types of coffee for special instances, I feel MD offers the best generic coffee on the market.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 07:16 PM
  #66  
bobwysiwyg 
Senior Member
 
bobwysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: 961' 42.28° N, 83.78° W (A2 ��)
Posts: 1,795

Bikes: Mongoose Selous, Trek DS

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 665 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
The first rule for any good coffee. Of all of fast food, MD has the best coffee by far. For years I wished that they offered it for sale in bags so I could make my own. They finally followed Duncan and Starbucks and made it available.

Now if they'd just offer the whole bean it would be my first stop. Although there are countless different gourmet blends, styles and types of coffee for special instances, I feel MD offers the best generic coffee on the market.
I can remember when coffee at The Arches was rather putrid. Then they switched to the current blend, much better, never hesitate getting on the road when in the mood for some java.
__________________
"Skepticism is the first step in critical thinking." -- Me
bobwysiwyg is online now  
Old 11-15-18, 06:45 AM
  #67  
Tamiya
Senior Member
 
Tamiya's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: AU, MY, SG & ZZZzzz...
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by coffeesnob View Post
actually in a pinch macdonalds hs decent coffee when it is fresh and if you are 55 or over you get a senior discount.
McDs filter coffee used to be the best perc back when

These days our Maccas have McCafes, they do proper espresso & steamed milk. Senior citizens enjoy a FREE coffee with any purchase...
Tamiya is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 09:33 AM
  #68  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,555

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 58 Times in 44 Posts
I had a sip of a McD coffee once, a few years back, since they started advertising about their coffee. Didn't like it. I think I just don't like the roast. It was way too bright (almost acidic) for me. I prefer dark and smooth. Sumatra FTW
RubeRad is online now  
Old 11-15-18, 10:41 AM
  #69  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 938

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 593 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
I had a sip of a McD coffee once, a few years back, since they started advertising about their coffee. Didn't like it. I think I just don't like the roast. It was way too bright (almost acidic) for me. I prefer dark and smooth. Sumatra FTW
They shoot for the middle/mainstream. And flavors change as the [post-roast]beans age--even over the course of a few weeks. For bevies like espresso, anything beyond three-ish weeks of the roast date is gonna be going south fairly quick. Other brew methods aren't quite as fussy.
I'm closer to a trucker's taste buds than a barista's. When the description mentions notes of plum, chocolate, raspberry, crème brûlée, blah blah blah---yeah, that's not me.
skijor is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 11:24 AM
  #70  
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,752

Bikes: 2015 22 Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1495 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by skijor View Post



I'm closer to a trucker's taste buds than a barista's. When the description mentions notes of plum, chocolate, raspberry, crème brûlée, blah blah blah---yeah, that's not me.
...then intensity of Louisiana sausage and nose of secret sauce with just a hint of crispy deep-fried Belgian fries and Icelandic lamb's eye.
McBTC is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 05:10 PM
  #71  
BenzFanatic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Chicagoland area
Posts: 81
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I accidentally bought a bag of decaf yesterday, was crushed this morning. Luckily I still have some Aldi cat litter left.
BenzFanatic is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 05:23 PM
  #72  
bobwysiwyg 
Senior Member
 
bobwysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: 961' 42.28° N, 83.78° W (A2 ��)
Posts: 1,795

Bikes: Mongoose Selous, Trek DS

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 665 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by BenzFanatic View Post
I accidentally bought a bag of decaf yesterday, was crushed this morning. Luckily I still have some Aldi cat litter left.
__________________
"Skepticism is the first step in critical thinking." -- Me
bobwysiwyg is online now  
Old 11-16-18, 10:25 AM
  #73  
bigbenaugust 
always rides with luggage
 
bigbenaugust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: KIGX
Posts: 2,104

Bikes: 2007 Trek SU100, 2009 Fantom CX, 2012 Fantom Cross Uno, Bakfiets

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I drink gas station coffee. I'm not picky.
__________________
--Ben
2006 Trek SU100, 2009 Motobecane Fantom CX, 2011 Motobecane Fantom Cross Uno, and a Bakfiets
Previously: 2000 Trek 4500 (2000-2003), 2003 Novara Randonee (2003-2006), 2003 Giant Rainier (2003-2008), 2005 Xootr Swift (2005-2007), 2007 Nashbar 1x9 (2007-2011), 2011 Windsor Shetland (2011-2014), 2008 Citizen Folder (2015)
Non-Bike hardware: MX Linux / BunsenLabs Linux / Raspbian / Mac OS 10.6 / Android 7
bigbenaugust is offline  
Old 11-16-18, 03:13 PM
  #74  
no motor?
Senior Member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,076

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 957 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by bigbenaugust View Post
I drink gas station coffee. I'm not picky.
That was part of the appeal of coffee when I drank it - the experience was as important as the coffee itself. Some of those late night road trips were fueled by gas station coffee, and I preferred that to the fancy smantsy stuff.
no motor? is offline  
Old 11-16-18, 07:23 PM
  #75  
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,752

Bikes: 2015 22 Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1495 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
When you've been pedaling all day with not much around when ready to make camp... even gas station burgers sound good. That's about all I can think of that even makes fried chicken gizzards in a liquor store seem like a good idea.
McBTC is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.