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Foundation home vs manufactured home

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Foundation home vs manufactured home

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Old 02-05-19, 02:35 AM
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Hondo Gravel
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Foundation home vs manufactured home

As a kid I lived in a two story foundation house too young to know or care. Parents divorced blah blah blah then my home was aka mobile home for the next 27 years survived etc etc in time Iím back into a house with a foundation ( Iím talking physical structure not family ) I know so what My observation is the superficial stigma put on homes that have a concrete slab foundation or not like a manufactured home. Silly to make judgment calls on people on the foundation of the house you live in. I know one type is more expensive but I donít care. IMO you already won the lottery being born an American. Then I see coastal Texas house built on stilts bike riding makes me think.
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Old 02-05-19, 03:29 AM
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I really don't care what kind of a house friends or acquaintances live in.

One thing I've noticed, many "manufactured homes" take a lot of short cuts in construction. Good insulation, usually, but everything else is just cheaply done.

Nonetheless, they've been coming out with better designs than the boxes from the 1960's and 1970's.
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Old 02-05-19, 08:16 AM
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I think the term you want to use is "stick-built" vs manufactured. You can (& should) do a concrete block footer & brick wall foundation on manufactured housing. Still need the tie-downs but it's better insulation & support than just skirting alone and in NC it allows it to be classified as "real property" and the house tied to the land permanently.

Being C&V oriented by nature, I love some of those Florida retirement communities of vintage mobile homes....not so sure I'd want to ride out a hurricane in one though.

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Old 02-05-19, 09:22 AM
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My house is a "foundation home" and I wouldn't say it provides any sort of advantages-- particularly when it comes to service/repairs on HVAC or plumbing. On a mobile or a modular, you just open the access panel and head into the (usually) 3' tall crawlspace. Most everything is under there. My crawlspace is full of old plumbing, raccoon poop, and is in some places about 12" high.

For about 30 years, my grandmother lived in a fairly poshy seniors mobile home park, about 1 mile from the Pacific in Huntington Beach. As it was a senior park, the residents had a tendency to do what humans do, which is get old and then die. Then the park would make every effort to buy out the space/unit from whoever inherited it (or in some cases, force the tenants out by skyrocketing the space rent,) pull out the existing mobile, and put in a modular. So instead of a $400-500 a month space rent and a $50k mobile, it's now $1,200 space rent and a $250,000 modular.

And my grandmother's mobile was nice. Jacuzzi tubs, huge walkthrough kitchen, you name it. I got no issue at all with mobile/modular homes. If I had to rebuild where am now (for whatever reason) it would almost certainly be modular.
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Old 02-05-19, 09:24 AM
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My house is on pillar and post.

The main problem is there will not be much room for my grown kids to move back into the basement.
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Old 02-05-19, 09:50 AM
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After watching Trailer Park Boys...I don't want to live in a trailer.
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Old 02-05-19, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Then I see coastal Texas house built on stilts.
Comes in handy when you are prone to flooding. This house is in west central New Jersey along the Delaware River in an area that had flooded many times.

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Old 02-05-19, 09:55 AM
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Tornadoes are very attracted to trailer parks , it seems..
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Old 02-05-19, 10:45 AM
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Our first house as a married couple was a mobile home. 29x56 double, bought new in 2006. I have many fond memories of not living in a fixer-upper.
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Old 02-05-19, 10:59 AM
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My home is a mobile with a concrete slab under it and a 3 foot crawl space. No problems whatsoever in 5 years. I initially worried about water lines freezing, but with good heat wrap and a steady power stream (due to being on the same grid as the fire station, I'm told), it's been a non issue. I do miss being able to store my bikes in the basement as opposed to some of them in the garage, and some in the shed.
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Old 02-05-19, 06:51 PM
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Saw a house built up the block from me a few years back. Upon a poured foundation, the walls were all lifted off the flatbed by a crane and installed. It was wood stick and frame, just assembled someplace else. The roof was all engineered beams and went in in a day. It seems it took about 1/4 the time to get this place installed and closed up. Never been in it so can’t judge the quality.

Also saw a Target multi-story parking garage go up across from work one year. 3 levels, all pre-fab, pre-stressed concrete, like that pedestrian bridge that fell at Univ. Miami. The Target garage went up in 6 weeks using a crew of about 16, It was remarkable.

Then watched our new all concrete Performing Arts Center go up at the college I work at. 7 years. We think they sprinkled concrete seeds during each growing season and waited for a floor to grow. Painful to watch.

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Old 02-05-19, 07:13 PM
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The resident buys the structure but the lot is still trailer park property. Sometimes an old trailer park is sold and the tenants must move their old homes that don't meet the codes of newer trailer parks, so those old homes may be worthless.
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Old 02-05-19, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
Saw a house built up the block from me a few years back. Upon a poured foundation, the walls were all lifted off the flatbed by a crane and installed. It was wood stick and frame, just assembled someplace else. The roof was all engineered beams and went in in a day. It seems it took about 1/4 the time to get this place installed and closed up. Never been in it so canít judge the quality.

Also saw a Target multi-story parking garage go up across from work one year. 3 levels, all pre-fab, pre-stressed concrete, like that pedestrian bridge that fell at Univ. Miami. The Target garage went up in 6 weeks using a crew of about 16, It was remarkable.

Then watched our new all concrete Performing Arts Center go up at the college I work at. 7 years. We think they sprinkled concrete seeds during each growing season and waited for a floor to grow. Painful to watch.

I'm guessing the performace space had all sorts of interesting levels, sloped spaces ("seating areas") and open unsuppored structure, whereas the parking garage is a bunch of uniform boxes at consistent heights, with plenty of regular supports.
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Old 02-06-19, 12:05 AM
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I think the speed at which a "performance space" is completed comes down to a single factor: $$$$

Two of the local High Schools started construction on Performing Arts Centers at around the same time. One at a public HS in the part of town where all the houses have security doors, and the other a private Catholic HS (that costs 7 grand a year to attend.)

The center at the Catholic HS was finished last fall. The one at the public school still isn't finished.
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Old 02-06-19, 12:45 AM
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We shouldn't judge each other if we can avoid it, especially based on the homes they can afford. We live in homes that make sense for us, given what we can afford. Some of us wish for better than we have, and that's not a sin.
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Old 02-06-19, 12:49 AM
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Many homes in Texas and Oklahoma (probably other states too) are pier and beam due to the shifting soil. Those homes can appear kinda Tobacco Road hillbilly if the exterior isn't maintained, but it's practical.

My grandparents' home was built in two stages: the first was an older home trucked onto their lakefront property and set on pier and beam; the addition was on a foundation. The natural grade of the land made it mostly seamless. But the foundation of the newer section built on site was higher maintenance in some respects -- mostly plumbing. The older raised section was easier to maintain, but also more vulnerable to problems that demanded maintenance. It's a tossup.

As for appearances, I suppose I've lived in Texas so long I hardly notice. Most rural counties have few or no zoning laws or HOAs so pretty much anything goes. The town where my grandparents lived had really nice homes next to dumps built out of mobile homes attached to metal prefab storage sheds attached to DIY cinder block attached to chicken shacks, with the usual six vehicles on blocks and two or three rotting boats. But folks who buy property and build in rural counties know what they're getting themselves into. They get a lot of land cheap and can build the homes of their dreams right next door to the homes of their nightmares. Yay, libertarianism.
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Old 02-06-19, 05:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Zedoo View Post
The resident buys the structure but the lot is still trailer park property. Sometimes an old trailer park is sold and the tenants must move their old homes that don't meet the codes of newer trailer parks, so those old homes may be worthless.
You hit on the kicker about the lot. You can get a lot of house for the $ with a manufactured home, but you give it all up in lot rent over the years.

Still, there are some pretty good deals in the 55 plus parks down here, and a lot of the parks are really nice. And, they tend to be more social than regular neighborhoods, even if the socializing is just barbecues and bingo.
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Old 02-06-19, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Zedoo View Post
The resident buys the structure but the lot is still trailer park property. Sometimes an old trailer park is sold and the tenants must move their old homes that don't meet the codes of newer trailer parks, so those old homes may be worthless.
That happened at least once near where we were (silicon valley)... I sometimes wondered who was next.
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Old 02-06-19, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I really don't care what kind of a house friends or acquaintances live in.

One thing I've noticed, many "manufactured homes" take a lot of short cuts in construction. Not True Good insulation, usually, but everything else is just cheaply done.Not True

Nonetheless, they've been coming out with better designs than the boxes from the 1960's and 1970's.
...
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Old 02-06-19, 11:40 AM
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You wanna know who takes shortcuts in construction? The massive developers, like Richmond, KB Homes, etc. You know, the guys who specialize in 45 and 60 day turnkeys-- which is, from the time the slab is poured, it's usually around 8 weeks and they have the listing up.

It's all wet lumber-- which has been sitting there on the ground gathering termites since the slab was poured-- and as soon as it's framed out, they're shooting in insulation and sheetrock right over top. Then the texture gets shot before the mud is even dry, so it ends up all uneven.

One of the big subdivisions about 15 miles from us had to have 30-some homes torn down HAZMAT style, because the wet on wet on wet had filled the places with black mold. The framing is generally shoddy, and covered up with some of the worst finish work I've ever seen.

Source: I did termite control and structural repair for several years, and have seen 2 year old houses in worse shape than 25 year old houses. If you have to have a termite guy come out to your 2-year old house, that's a bad sign.
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Old 02-06-19, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
You wanna know who takes shortcuts in construction?.
Low bidders.

Federal, State and local governments sometimes have something similar to what is known in NY as the Wicks Law, which requires low bid on publicly funded projects.

The bidders are than under the gun to deliver on very tight and specific projects, on time, and still make money. The end user (the state) always wants it Quick, Cheap and Great and we all know how that works. As well the supervising agency for the state is typically understaffed due to a government policy of "the fewer workers on the payroll, they less they have to pay out in medical and pension" so as government agencies get paired back, there's too few people watching how a project gets built and protecting the taxpayers interests.

On our Perf. Arts facility and since it was mostly a concrete structure, the concrete supplier found himself needing to sell concrete to the project at prices he had bid on, then and with a massive construction boom in NYC at the time, found he couldn't buy the concrete for less then he was selling. Thus couldn't deliver. That slows down a project.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
Saw a house built up the block from me a few years back. Upon a poured foundation, the walls were all lifted off the flatbed by a crane and installed. It was wood stick and frame, just assembled someplace else. The roof was all engineered beams and went in in a day. It seems it took about 1/4 the time to get this place installed and closed up. Never been in it so canít judge the quality.
https://www.curbed.com/2016/10/10/13...-home-building

These were pretty cool prefabricated homes. They seemed to have held up well too. Sears did the same thing decades before that, but with wood instead of metal.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
You wanna know who takes shortcuts in construction? The massive developers, like Richmond, KB Homes, etc. You know, the guys who specialize in 45 and 60 day turnkeys-- which is, from the time the slab is poured, it's usually around 8 weeks and they have the listing up.

It's all wet lumber-- which has been sitting there on the ground gathering termites since the slab was poured-- and as soon as it's framed out, they're shooting in insulation and sheetrock right over top. Then the texture gets shot before the mud is even dry, so it ends up all uneven.

One of the big subdivisions about 15 miles from us had to have 30-some homes torn down HAZMAT style, because the wet on wet on wet had filled the places with black mold. The framing is generally shoddy, and covered up with some of the worst finish work I've ever seen.

Source: I did termite control and structural repair for several years, and have seen 2 year old houses in worse shape than 25 year old houses. If you have to have a termite guy come out to your 2-year old house, that's a bad sign.
Yup, saw it many times when I was an inspector for federal OSHA. We seldom did residential housing construction inspections unless there was a complaint or serious accident. But every time we did those inspections you could tell those homes would be ready to raze in 10-20 years.

Right now a former haven for local cyclists, the old rambling Walsh Ranch area west of Fort Worth, is undergoing rapid change toward McMansions. Very attractive to people who can't actually afford the lifestyle they're aspiring to. But cheap gas makes it cost effective to commute long distances. So old unused farm and ranch land is developed for fancy looking new homes without resorting to zero lot lines putting homes nut to butt and shoulder to shoulder with neighbors.

Never mind construction quality, road development, utilities or anything else. Just get the municipality on board and promise to address the peripheral development later.

In reality, for the next 10-20 years, the homes will begin to crumble while the overburdened two-lane blacktop farm to market roads see massive increases in collisions from traffic they were never intended to handle when the highways were built decades ago to serve a handful of farm and ranch families.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:28 PM
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different areas of the country require different types of foundations. wrong place to make the broad stroke. the rest of the discussion, well I have no opinion.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:50 PM
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A recent episode from one of my favorite Podcasts, 99% Invisible. It's worth a listen.

The House That Came In The Mail.


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