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Old 02-08-19, 12:53 PM
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House inside paint quality question

Painting inside house... Using Color Place Ultra from Walmart.

I painted a metal door a week ago...I scratched lightly with my fingernail on the metal door...and paint peeled off a little. Is thist normal?
The original paint on the metal door was very good...except it was turning yellow for some unknown reason....so I didn't use primer on the metal door.




I also painted the walls. So I go do the fingernail test on the walls...but the walls did not peel...thank God.



So go read some reviews of this paint...some say it is cheap paint...some say it good paunt...should I buy premium $$$ paunt instead?

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Old 02-08-19, 01:17 PM
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If you're selling your house Walmart paint is perfectly acceptable.
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Old 02-08-19, 02:34 PM
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What finish paint did you use, flat, semi-gloss, etc. The higher the gloss the longer to completely dry/cure all the way thru has been my experience. Also, what was the finish you tried to cover. The more gloss the harder. And finally, did you prep it at all? TSP, or similar, wash is always a good idea. It removes grease and grime that will make adhesion difficult.
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Old 02-08-19, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Painting inside house... Using Color Place Ultra from Walmart.

I painted a metal door a week ago...I scratched lightly with my fingernail on the metal door...and paint peeled off a little. Is thist normal?
The original paint on the metal door was very good...except it was turning yellow for some unknown reason....so I didn't use primer on the metal door.
I think that's your problem right there. Surely a metal surface needs primer for good paint adhesion. (Adherence? Adhelation?)
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Old 02-09-19, 09:06 AM
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Metal door may also require a mild acid wash... then primer. But if you're sell and running away, why bother.
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Old 02-09-19, 09:53 AM
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no the paint looked clean...so i didnt wash it with TSP or anything.

i will sell the house if i get lay off this summer...but there is a chance i will not, then i will stay in the house. so i figure i better do a half descent job.

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Old 02-09-19, 10:01 AM
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It does take a long time for paint to fully cure. It dries in a day, but continues to harden for weeks. So it will peel or scratch more easily in the first week after it's painted. And that's especially true on metal surfaces. Of course paint will never adhere well to some surfaces without appropriate prep.
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Old 02-09-19, 04:06 PM
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The quality in a paint job is in the prep work. The actual paint can vary quite widely in quality and with good prep still provide a good job. ALWAYS wash with true TSP (not the fake stuff), scuff/sand where necessary, prime with a quality primer (in fact the primer is probably more important than the finish paint) and then finally apply the color coat(s). Drying time and cure time are not the same thing. Typical interior paint dries to the touch quickly, but cures slowly.

Now you know why painters charge so much for a quality job, and so little for a quickie. Any hack can wipe the dirt off with a rag and slap some paint on just about any surface. A quality paint job is a lot of work.

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Old 02-09-19, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto View Post
A quality paint job is a lot of work.

-Kedosto

We've been in the same house for 42 years, many repaints inside and out. I did once hire an interior painter for project when I was still working, I didn't have time. Regretted it. I'm slow and particular. I'd put my painting skills up against anyone's. Now, electrical work? A whole other story.
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Old 02-09-19, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post

We've been in the same house for 42 years, many reprints inside and out. I did once hire an interior painter for project when I was still working, I didn't have time. Regretted it. I'm slow and particular. I'd put my painting skills up against anyone's. Now, electrical work? A whole other story.
​​​​​

It's been my experience painting is only part of the hard work. Moving all the furniture and stuff hanging on the walls is a PIA. Of which if you hire a painter you still have to move all your furniture.
​​​​​​ As far as electrical work goes, I just got done wiring our 60 x 100 ft shop You-tube is a wonderful thing....
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Old 02-09-19, 09:31 PM
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Most of the metal doors I have worked with had a non-stick or at least mildly repellant finish that barely accepted scotch tape or sticky tack even when cleaned. Only a sand off and prime with a tenacious or etching primer in that scenario would assure adhesion. Conversely a wall is extremely porous and can accept a wide range of finishes with little issue.
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Old 02-10-19, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mtbikerinpa View Post
Conversely a wall is extremely porous and can accept a wide range of finishes with little issue.
Generally, I agree. Two exceptions would be bathrooms and kitchens. These walls and trim frequently require some additional cleaning and prep-work for good adhesion.
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Old 02-12-19, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
Generally, I agree. Two exceptions would be bathrooms and kitchens. These walls and trim frequently require some additional cleaning and prep-work for good adhesion.
not to mention cooking spatter and misc contaminants...
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Old 02-12-19, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by mtbikerinpa View Post
not to mention cooking spatter and misc contaminants...
Precisely. In bathrooms there are aerosols of all kinds that cling to walls and woodwork.
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Old 02-19-19, 07:36 AM
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Been a painter my whole life so let me weigh in. If the door is a metal door, it more than likely has oil paint on the surface. Water based paint will not adhere without the proper primer. The primer will not adhere without proper washing and sanding of the surface. In this case it would of been best to wash the surface, light sand and apply a coat of oil, preferable semi-gloss. now that there is a coat of latex, that is not adhering, the latex should be removed, and you should start all over again. Try a small test area of stripper to see if it will work. The stripper should be a citris based product so as to not affect the oil finish, only the latex.
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Old 02-19-19, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Ptcycles View Post
Been a painter my whole life so let me weigh in. If the door is a metal door, it more than likely has oil paint on the surface. Water based paint will not adhere without the proper primer. The primer will not adhere without proper washing and sanding of the surface. In this case it would of been best to wash the surface, light sand and apply a coat of oil, preferable semi-gloss. now that there is a coat of latex, that is not adhering, the latex should be removed, and you should start all over again. Try a small test area of stripper to see if it will work. The stripper should be a citris based product so as to not affect the oil finish, only the latex.
Can I try to get the latex paint off by scrapping it? I can scratch it off with my finger nail. How about if I use a plastic scrapper that came with the joint compound? Just trying to avoid powerful chemicals.
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Old 02-19-19, 02:11 PM
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You should get your metal door powder-coated with your next custom steel frame.
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Old 02-19-19, 08:27 PM
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If the paint comes off that easy, go for it. Just don't scratch into the original coat, since it will need sanding to feather out the scratch. Like you said, a plastic scraper is best. Should you get the majority of latex off, denatured alcohol will soften the remaining latex and not affect the base coat.
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