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Music The Standards AKA Great American Songbook

Old 12-30-21, 10:38 AM
  #951  
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"The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia" is a Southern Gothic murder ballad, written in 1972 by songwriter Bobby Russell and first recorded by singer and comedian Vicki Lawrence. Lawrence's version, from her 1973 album of the same name, went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 after its release. In addition to several other renditions, the song was a hit in 1991 when Reba McEntire covered it for her album For My Broken Heart. McEntire's version peaked at number 12 on Hot Country Songs.

Although Bobby Russell both wrote the lyrics and composed the music for the song, he was reluctant to record even a demonstration because he didn't like it. Lawrence, who was married to Russell at the time, believed the song was a hit and recorded the demo. The publishers and the record label did not know how to pitch the song, as it was not a country or a pop song. The first thought was to offer the song to actress/singer Liza Minnelli, but eventually it was offered to singer Cher, but her then-husband and manager Sonny Bono reportedly refused it, as he was said to be concerned that the song might offend Cher's southern fans. Without a singer to record the song, Lawrence, along with producer Snuff Garrett, went into a studio and recorded it professionally herself, with the instrumental backing of L.A. session musicians from the Wrecking Crew.

Returning home from a two-week trip to a place called Candletop, the narrator's unnamed brother stops for a drink at Webb's Bar before going home to his wife. While at the bar he encounters his friend Andy Wolloe, who informs him that while he was gone his wife was having an affair with "that Amos boy, Seth", and then admits that he had been with her as well. Brother leaves the bar angry, and a frightened Andy makes his way home.

Assuming his wife had left town, Brother goes home to find the gun his father had left him and quietly makes his way through the backwoods to Andy's house. On the way there he notices a set of footprints leading to and from the house, but they are too small to have been made by Andy. Arriving at his back door, Brother finds Andy inside lying dead on the floor from a gunshot. In a panic, he fires a shot in the air to get the attention of the police, only to find himself arrested for Andy's murder. In a show trial, the judge wastes little time declaring Brother guilty and sentences him to death by hanging, which is carried out in short order.

The story wraps up as the narrator reveals that it was her footprints that Brother saw on his way to Andy's house. She then confesses that she had not only killed Andy, but Brother's adulterous wife as well, disposing of the latter's body where she is certain nobody will ever find it boasting, "Little Sister don't miss when she aims her gun."

In the song's chorus, the singer blames the local criminal justice system for her brother's death, warning the listener, "Don't trust your soul to no backwoods Southern lawyer, 'cause the judge in the town's got blood stains on his hands."

Reba McEntire version


Vicki Lawrence version


Tanya Tucker version


The Countrypolitans version


Ray Conniff Singers version


The Hit Co version


Lynn Anderson version


Melinda Schneider · Beccy Cole version


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Old 12-30-21, 12:25 PM
  #952  
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"Walk on the Wild Side" is a song by Lou Reed from his second solo album, Transformer (1972). It was produced by David Bowie and Mick Ronson and released as a double A-side with "Perfect Day". Known as a counterculture anthem, the song received wide radio coverage and became Reed's biggest hit and signature song while touching on topics considered taboo at the time, such as transgender people, drugs, male prostitution, and oral sex.

The song's lyrics, describing a series of individuals and their journeys to New York City, refer to several of the regular "superstars" at Andy Warhol's New York studio, the Factory; the song mentions Holly Woodlawn, Candy Darling, Joe Dallesandro, Jackie Curtis and Joe Campbell (referred to in the song by the nickname "Sugar Plum Fairy").

In 2013, The New York Times described "Walk on the Wild Side" as a "ballad of misfits and oddballs" that "became an unlikely cultural anthem, a siren song luring generations of people...to a New York so long forgotten as to seem imaginary". In 2010, Rolling Stone ranked "Walk on the Wild Side" at number 223 in its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

Lou Reed version


Herbie Mann version


Karima version


Coco M version


Edie Brickell & New Bohemians version


André Ceccarelli - Carte Blanche - Stephy Hayek version


Jesse Malin version


Aram Quartet version


*Marco Detto · Beatrice Zanolini version


Adam Karch version


Eve St. Jones version


Mark Winkler – Cheryl Bentyne version


The Jimmy Castor Bunch version


Albert Pla El Lado Mas Bestia version


Marky Mark & The Funky Bunch version


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Old 12-31-21, 09:06 AM
  #953  
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"Feels So Good" is the title of an instrumental composition by the American flugelhorn player Chuck Mangione. It was written and produced by Mangione, and is the title track from his 1977 album.

The album version of "Feels So Good" runs almost ten minutes, but an edited (3 min 28 sec) version was released as a single in early 1978, which reached #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in June of that year after spending a week atop the Billboard easy listening chart in May. The recording was also nominated for a Grammy Award for Record of the Year at the ceremony held in 1979, losing out to Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are". Mangione re-recorded the tune (as a slow ballad, and with lyrics sung by Don Potter) for his 1982 album 70 Miles Young.

Mangione was quoted describing the editing of the original version of the track as "major surgery."

Chuck Mangione version


Chuck Mangione – Don Potter vocals


Dani Felber Big Band version


Alison Brown – Jake Shimabukuro version


Philips Westin Orchestra version


Nicole Sasser version


Helmut Jost version


Dr Strange & Chuck Mangione (Movie Trailer “Baal”)

Ann Ellsworth · Keve Wilson · Mike Boschen · Andrew Bove · Erik Della Penna version


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Old 01-02-22, 12:12 PM
  #954  
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Won't You Be My Neighbor? (Song)

The song "Won't You Be My Neighbor?"was written by Fred Rogers in 1967 and was used as the opening theme for each episode of the show.

In the first three seasons of the show, during which new episodes were constantly being produced, each show ended with the song "Tomorrow", which was written by Rogers' former colleague, Josie Carey. Starting with Season 4 in 1971, "Tomorrow" was used only on Monday through Thursday episodes, and a new closing song, which is titled as "The Weekend Song", was used only on Friday episodes as the program would not return until Monday.

Eventually, the "Tomorrow" song was removed entirely due to copyright issues, and by 1973, Rogers sang "It's Such a Good Feeling" at the end of each episode. Prior to 1973, the original version of "It's Such a Good Feeling" was used as part of Mister Rogers' general repertoire of songs. When "It's Such a Good Feeling" became the closing theme for Mister Rogers' Neighborhood in 1973, it used a rewrite of "The Weekend Song" at the end, using only the first four lines: "And I'll be back when the day is new, and I'll have more ideas for you. And you'll have things you'll want to talk about; I will too". This was only used on Monday through Thursday episodes. On Friday episodes, the lyric was changed to "week" instead of "day". On early episodes of this season, the line was originally written as "When tomorrow is new".



Johnny Costa version


Tom Hanks (Movie) version


Dexter Porter version


VoiceBox version


Roberta Flack version


Holly Yarbrough version


Sherie Rene Scott version


Voctave version


Benny Benack III version


Joe Negri version


Mr. Bungle version


Steve Tyrell version


The Cowsills version


Jasper Kump version


Jill Govan version


Daniel Knox version


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Old 01-04-22, 12:06 AM
  #955  
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"Peter Gunn" is the theme music composed by Henry Mancini for the television show of the same name. The song was the opening track on the original soundtrack album, The Music from Peter Gunn, released in 1959. Mancini won an Emmy Award and two Grammys for Album of the Year and Best Arrangement.

In his 1989 autobiography, Did They Mention the Music? Mancini states:

The Peter Gunn title theme actually derives more from rock and roll than from jazz. I used guitar and piano in unison, playing what is known in music as an ostinato, which means obstinate. It was sustained throughout the piece, giving it a sinister effect, with some frightened saxophone sounds and some shouting brass. The piece has one chord throughout and a super-simple top line.

Lyrics were added by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans and first recorded in 1965 by Sarah Vaughan in an arrangement by Bill Holman on her album Sarah Vaughan Sings the Mancini Songbook. Mancini also recorded a vocal version titled "Bye Bye" that is on his 1967 soundtrack album Gunn...Number One!

Henry Mancini version


The Blues Brothers (Movie) version


Sarah Vaughan version


King Curtis version


Anita Kerr Singers version


Dave Grusin version


Pat Donohue version


Ray Anthony version


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Old 01-06-22, 12:10 AM
  #956  
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"Speak Softly, Love" is a popular song published in 1972, with music by Nino Rota and lyrics by Larry Kusik. The song was first introduced as an instrumental theme in the 1972 film The Godfather that was simply known as "Love Theme from The Godfather". The highest-charting rendition of either version was by vocalist Andy Williams, who took "Speak Softly Love" to number 34 on Billboard magazine's Hot 100 and number seven on its Easy Listening chart.

Larry Kusik wrote the original, English lyrics, and Nino Rota wrote the music, that was used in Fortunella a 1958 Italian film directed by Eduardo De Filippo with script by Federico Fellini. Different sets of lyrics for the song were written in French (Parle plus bas), Italian (Parla più piano), Sicilian (Brucia la terra), and Spanish (Amor háblame dulcemente). Dalida sings the French version; the Sicilian version is sung by Anthony Corleone (Franc D'Ambrosio) in The Godfather Part III. It was first heard in America in 1970 on The Merv Griffin Show sung by Angela Bacari in English and Italian.

Paramount Pictures (Movie theme) version


Colin Schachat Version?


Jonathan Antione version


Jonas Kaufmann version


Volpe · Von Mondo version


Stringspace version


Johnny Mathis version


Ray Conniff & The Singers version


Forsvarets Stabsmusikkorps · Angelina Jordan · The Staff Band of the Norwegian Armed Forces


The Puppini Sisters version


Franc D'ambrosio version


Andrea Bocelli version


Dalida version


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Old 01-08-22, 12:08 AM
  #957  
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"Help Me Make It Through The Night" is a country music ballad written and composed by Kris Kristofferson and released on his 1970 album Kristofferson. It was covered later in 1970 by Sammi Smith, on the album Help Me Make It Through the Night.

Smith's recording of the song (in May 1970) remains the most commercially successful, and best-known, version in the United States. Her recording ranks among the most successful country singles of all time in terms of sales, popularity, and radio airplay. It topped the country singles chart, and was also a crossover hit, reaching number eight on the U.S. pop singles chart. "Help Me Make It Through The Night" also became Smith's signature song. In 1975, the title appeared in the lyrics of Paul Anka's "I Don't Like to Sleep Alone."

Kris Kristofferson said that he got the inspiration for the song from an Esquire Magazine interview with Frank Sinatra. When asked what he believed in, Frank replied, "Booze, broads, or a bible...whatever helps me make it through the night."

Kris Kristofferson's original lyrics speak of a man's yearning for sexual intimacy. They were controversial in 1970/1971 when the song was first covered by a woman, Sammi Smith in that case: "I don't care what's right or wrong, and I won't try to understand / Let the devil take tomorrow; Lord tonight, I need a friend."

During his time as a struggling songwriter, Kris Kristofferson wrote and composed the song while staying with Dottie West and her husband, Bill, at their home on Shy's Hill Road in Nashville's Green Hills neighborhood. When he offered Dottie West the song, she originally claimed it was "too suggestive" for her. Eventually, she would record it before the year was out, and it is included on her album Careless Hands. However, by then, several others had recorded and released versions of it, some garnering great success. Later on, West said that not recording "Help Me Make It Through The Night" when Kristofferson originally offered it to her was one of the greatest regrets of her career; though her version charted, it was not as successful as Smith's version had been.

Sammi Smith's recording (made in May 1970) reached number-one on the U.S. country charts and won the Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance. On February 20, 1971, it reached number 8 on Billboard's U.S. pop singles chart, and also enjoyed success in Canada. Adult-Contemporary stations took to the song, and it peaked at number 3 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart. Additionally, it spent three weeks at number 1 on the Country chart. The song became a gold record.

Sammi Smith version


Kris Kristofferson version


Frances Mooney & Fontanna Sunset version


Willie Nelson version


Charlie McCoy version


Shannon McNally version


Percy Sledge version


Gladys Knight version


Freddy Fender version


Renee Olstead version


Jay Armsworthy & Eastern Tradition version


Elvis Presley version


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Old 01-09-22, 03:30 PM
  #958  
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James Moody and tenor saxophonist Jimmy Heath called each other "section," because both occupied seats in the saxophone section of bands led by Dizzy Gillespie, occasionally together. In honor of his section-mate, Heath wrote "Moody's Groove" on the occasion of Moody's 80th birthday in 2005. The tune is often played by the Dizzy Gillespie All-Star Band, a group of veterans of Gillespie's ensembles, and one which reunited Heath and Moody as section buddies once again. Courtesy of JazzSet, you can hear the All-Star Orchestra play it on the occasion of Moody's 80th birthday party at the Kennedy Center, with an introduction from Heath.

Hank Jones, Kenny Barron, Todd Coolman & Adam Nussbaum version


The Dizzy Gillespie All Star Band version


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Old 01-09-22, 11:27 PM
  #959  
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Elmer Bernstein's theme for The Magnificent Seven (1960) must rate as one of the most emotive Western themes ever and after more than 40 years it can still cause goose bumps.

Although the film wasn't a box office smash, the music by Elmer Bernstein was one the reasons for the film's continued admiration throughout the years, earning Bernstein an Oscar nomination for his score.

Elmer Bernstein was a true movie master and is responsible for some of the most iconic theme tunes of the second half of the 20th Century. His incredible body of work includes The Great Escape, My Left Foot, Cape Fear, The Age of Innocence and the original music for The Blues Brothers, but although nominated for an Oscar 14 times for his scores, he only won once – for Thoroughly Modern Millie.

Elmer Bernstein version


Cologne Saxophone Quintet feat. Bob Mintzer version


Henry Mancini version


Film Symphony Barcelona version


Benny Golson version


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Old 01-10-22, 07:11 PM
  #960  
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In 1964, Cal Tjader would score his biggest hit as a recording artist with the song “Soul Sauce” from an album of the same name. A Dizzy Gillespie original, Tjader’s version features a hypnotic Afro-Cuban groove punctuated by splashes of colorful vibraphone and the occasional shout-out of “Guachi Guaro” – a nonsense Spanish word made up by the group’s drummer, Willie Bobo. It became so popular that it landed in the Billboard Top 50 chart for 1965. Today, the album is considered a masterpiece of Latin jazz.

Cal Tjader version


The Estrada Brothers version


The Steven McGill Project version


Charles Kynard & Buddy Collette version


The Phil Norman Tentet version


Caribbean Jazz Project version


Michael Wolff & Impure Thoughts version


Arturo Sandoval · Chick Corea · Poncho Sanchez · Pete Escovedo version


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Old 01-12-22, 10:12 AM
  #961  
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"You Belong to Me" is a romantic popular music ballad from the 1950s. It is well known for its opening line, "See the pyramids along the Nile". The song was published in Hollywood on April 21, 1952, and the most popular version was by Jo Stafford, reaching No. 1 on both the UK and US singles charts.

"You Belong to Me" is credited to Chilton Price, Pee Wee King, and Redd Stewart.

Price, a songwriting librarian at WAVE Radio Louisville, had written the song in its virtual entirety as "Hurry Home to Me", envisioning the song as an American woman's plea to a sweetheart serving overseas in World War II. Afforded songwriting credit on the song mostly in exchange for their work in promoting it, King and Stewart did slightly adjust Price's composition musically and lyrically, shifting the focus from a wartime background "into a kind of universal song about separated lovers" (World War II having ended some years previously) and changing the title to "You Belong to Me". Price had previously had success with another hit which she had written, "Slow Poke", under a similar arrangement with the two men.

Jo Stafford version


The Duprees version


Bette Midler (Movie Down & Out in Beverly Hills) version


Bob Dylan (Movie Natural Born Killers) version


Patsy Cline version


The Duke Robillard Band version


Dean Martin version


Grady Martin & His Slew Foot Five – Cecil Bailey version


Clyde McPhatter version


Judy Garland – The Rhythmaires version


Annie Lennox version


OC Times version


The Cliftonaires version


Mose Allison version


Beegie Adair version


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Old 01-13-22, 11:28 PM
  #962  
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"Take Good Care of My Baby" is a song written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin. The song was made famous by Bobby Vee, when it was released in 1961.

Carole King (original demo version)


Jake Epstein · Jessie Mueller (Broadway Musical) version


Bobby Vee version


Beatles version


Frankie Valli version


The Lettermen version


Carole King version


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Old 01-16-22, 11:51 PM
  #963  
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"In the Heat of the Night" is a 1967 song performed by Ray Charles, composed by Quincy Jones, and written by Marilyn Bergman and Alan Bergman for the film In the Heat of the Night. As Matthew Greenwald of AllMusic states, the song "opens the film and accompanying soundtrack with a slice of real, rural backwoods gospel. Lyrically, one of the key lines is 'In the heat of the night/I'm feeling motherless somehow,' which clearly illustrates the main character's dilemma of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The main melody is guided by Charles' funky piano work and is buttressed by then-session ace Billy Preston's powerful, soulful organ trills. The underlying sense of drama that is so much a part of the film is reflected perfectly in this song, and the Ray Charles Singers add to this with a stately grace. It's perfect listening for a midsummer night when the temperature is just a bit too hot for comfort."

Released as a single by ABC Records, Charles' version of the song reached #33 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and #21 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles chart. The song was also released on the soundtrack album on United Artists in 1967.

For the 1988–95 television series of the same name, the song was recorded by Bill Champlin.

Ray Charles (Movie) version


Nancy Wilson version


Bill Champlin (TV series) version


Hank Crawford version


Nicki Parrott version


Rob Paparozzi version


TJ Johnson version


Jimmy McGriff & Junior Parker version


Ramsey Lewis version


SF Jazz Collective version
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Old 01-20-22, 12:46 AM
  #964  
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"Frenesí" is a musical piece originally composed by Alberto Domínguez Borrás for the marimba, and adapted as a jazz standard by Leonard Whitcup and others.

The word frenesí is Spanish for "frenzy".

A hit version recorded by Artie Shaw and His Orchestra (with an arrangement by William Grant Still) reached number one on the Billboard pop chart on December 21, 1940, staying for 13 weeks, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1982.

The Artie Shaw recording was used in the soundtrack of the 1980 film Raging Bull.

*Artie Shaw (Movie – Raging Bull) version


Betty Carter version


*Gramercy Six version


Sonia Santana version


*Mel Tormé version


*Lupita Palomera version


*Linda Ronstadt version


*Suzanne Mott – Tom Kincaid version


*Milton Nascimento version


*Natalie Cole version


*Joseph Leo Bwarie featuring Bucky Pizzarelli version


*New York Ska-Jazz Ensemble version


*Jeff Steinberg version


*Fay Claassen version


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Old 01-23-22, 12:21 AM
  #965  
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"My Girl" is a soul music song recorded by the Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) record label. Written and produced by the Miracles members Smokey Robinson and Ronald White, it became the Temptations' first U.S. number 1 single, and is today their signature song. Robinson's inspiration for writing "My Girl" was his wife, Miracles member Claudette Rogers Robinson. The song was included on the Temptations 1965 album The Temptations Sing Smokey. In 2017, the song was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or artistically significant".

After some persuasion from Ruffin's bandmates, Robinson had the Temptations record "My Girl" instead of the Miracles, who were originally going to record the song, and recruited Ruffin to sing the lead vocals. According to Robinson, he allowed the group to create their own background vocals "because they were so great at background vocals". Consequently, the Temptations came up with boosts like "hey hey hey" and a series of "my girls" that echo David's vocal." The opening bass notes are recognized around the world. As Smokey Robinson says, "I can be in a foreign country where people don't speak English and the audience will start cheering before I even start singing "My Girl." They know what's coming as soon as they hear the opening bass line. [He sings the famous line created by bassist James Jamerson:] 'Bah bum-bum, bah bum-bum, bah bum-bum.'" The signature guitar riff heard during the introduction and under the verses was played by Robert White of the Funk Brothers. This part can be heard without vocals on the 2004 deluxe edition of the soundtrack from the 2002 documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown.



The Overtones version


Il Divo version


Marvin Gaye version


Otis Redding version


The Mamas & The Papas version


Stevie Wonder version


Jackie Wilson – Count Basie version


Michael Jackson version


Major Lance version


The Whispers version


The Stanford Medicants version


Laura Zocca version


Jack Jezzro – Sam Levine version


Stringspace version


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Old 01-24-22, 12:14 AM
  #966  
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That's the Way of the World is the sixth studio album by American band Earth, Wind & Fire, released on March 15, 1975 by Columbia Records. It was also the soundtrack for a 1975 motion picture of the same name. The album rose to No. 1 on both the Billboard 200 and Top Soul Albums charts. That's the Way of the World has also been certified Triple Platinum in the U.S by the RIAA.

Charles Stepney, Verdine White, M. White

Earth Wind & Fire version


New York Voices version


Incognito version


West Coast Allstars version


Thelma Houston version


Joseph Vincelli version


Stuff version


Kim Pensyl version


Avenue Blue – Jeff Golub version


Ramsey Lewis version


Michael Paulo – Carl Anderson version


U.S. Air Force Jazz Ensemble version


Elliot Levine & Urban Grooves version


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Old 01-26-22, 01:29 AM
  #967  
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"Can I Change My Mind" is a 1968 single by Barry Despenza & Carl Wolfolkand, recorded by soul singer Tyrone Davis, his featured debut, which on February 1, 1969, replaced Marvin Gaye's "I Heard It through the Grapevine" to become the number-one song on the Billboard Hot R&B Singles chart, and it peaked at number five on the Hot 100, and reached RIAA Certified Gold status on February 24, 1969. The song is featured in the Larry Clark film Another Day in Paradise (1998).

Tyrone Davis version


Delmar Lamarr Organ Trio version


Loleatta Holloway version


Shirley Scott version


Gene Chandler version


Willie Henderson & The Soul Explosions version


Boz Skaggs version


Joe Krown, Walter Wolfman Washington & Russell Batiste Jr. version


Guitar Slim Jr version


Johnny Rivers version


Eddie Floyd version


Ron Levy version


The Pietasters version


Jill West & Blues Attack version


Natural Numbers · Judah Eskender Tafari version


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Old 01-26-22, 11:35 PM
  #968  
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"Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time)" is a song co-written by record producer Thom Bell and William Hart, lead singer of the American R&B/Soul vocal group the Delfonics. It was released by the group in 1969 on the Philly Groove record label and is regarded as a classic, winning a Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group.

It is considered one of the most notable early Philly soul singles and typical of the genre, "Didn't I" is a slow love ballad, with layered strings, horns, and chromatic production.

Among the Delfonics' signature songs, "Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time)" was a #3 hit on the Billboard R&B singles chart, and #10 on the Billboard pop chart in 1970. The song peaked at number 81 in Australia.

Overseas the song peaked at #22 on the UK Singles Chart in 1971.

The Delfonics version


Maxine Nightingale version


John Basile version


Larry Braggs version


Patti LaBelle version


David T. Walker version


Ed Hamilton version


Regina Belle version


Bob Baldwin – Russ Freeman version


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Old 01-29-22, 08:41 AM
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Some R&B for today


When Will I See You Again? – The Three Degrees version



Wedding Bell Blues – Laura Nyro version


You Got The Love - Chaka Khan & Rufus version


The Bells – The Originals version


The Bells – Laura Nyro - Patti LaBelle, Nona Hendryx, and Sarah Dash version



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Old 01-31-22, 08:58 PM
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"The Long and Winding Road" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1970 album Let It Be. It was written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. When issued as a single in May 1970, a month after the Beatles' break-up, it became the group's 20th and last number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States.

The main recording of the song took place in January 1969 and featured a sparse musical arrangement. When preparing the tapes from these sessions for release in April 1970, producer Phil Spector added orchestral and choral overdubs. Spector's modifications angered McCartney to the point that when he made his case in the English High Court for the Beatles' disbandment, McCartney cited the treatment of the song as one of six reasons justifying the split. New versions of the song with simpler instrumentation were subsequently released by McCartney and by the Beatles.

In 2011, Rolling Stone ranked "The Long and Winding Road" at number 90 on their list of 100 greatest Beatles songs.



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Old 02-03-22, 12:19 AM
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Early Autumn – Elizabeth Soychak version


The Beat Goes On – Emilie-Claire Barlow version


Fever – Eva Cassidy version


Scotch & Soda – GQ version



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Old 02-04-22, 07:58 AM
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Moonlight In Vermont – Willie Nelson version


Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye – Arturo Sandoval & Accent version


Norwegian Wood – Sergio Mendes version


On Broadway – Tito Puente version


By The Time I Get To Phoenix – Heather Myles version


Oh ’Lady Be Good – Dee Dee Bridgewater version

Hymn to Friday – Oscar Brown Jr version


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Old 02-04-22, 11:19 PM
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Olympic Fanfare, Bugler’s Dream – National Symphonic Winds Orchestra





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Old 02-05-22, 08:19 AM
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"Stranger in Paradise" is a popular song from the musical Kismet (1953), credited to Robert Wright and George Forrest. Like almost all the music in that show, the melody was taken from music composed by Alexander Borodin (1833–1887), in this case, the "Gliding Dance of the Maidens", from the Polovtsian Dances in the opera Prince Igor (1890). The song in the musical is a lovers' duet and describes the transcendent feelings that love brings to their surroundings. Later versions were mostly edited to be sung by male solo artists.

"Stranger in Paradise" was recorded by Artie Shaw and sung by Pauline Byrne in 1940, though the lyrics differ completely from "Stranger in Paradise." Richard Kiley and Doretta Morrow performed the song in the original cast of Kismet (1953). Vic Damone and Ann Blyth performed the song in the 1955 film.

The most popular version was sung by Tony Bennett (1953), but other versions by The Four Aces (backed by the Jack Pleis Orchestra) and Tony Martin also received popular favor in 1953. Bennett's version reached number one in the UK Singles Chart in May 1955. It was not until 1955 that Kismet, and thus the songs from the show, came to London. It was Bennett's debut hit record in the United Kingdom.

In 2011, Tony Bennett rerecorded the song as a duet with Andrea Bocelli for Bennett's album Duets II. Also in 2011, the anime Appleseed XIII used instrumental versions of the song for both its starting and ending themes.

Doretta Morrow & Richard Kiley version


Tony Bennett version


Sarah Brightman version


Tony Bennett & Andrea Bocelli version


The Four Aces version


Caterina Valente version


Della Reese version


Stephanie Crawford version


Opera Babes: Karen England & Rebecca Knight version


The Ink Spots version


Astrid Seriese · Erwin Van Ligten version


Rachael Beck – David Hobson version


The Hit Co. version


Artie Shaw – Pauline Byrne version


Coleman Hawkins version


George Shearing & The Montgomery Brothers version


Erik Söderlind – Martin Widlund – Robert Erlandsson version


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Old 02-05-22, 10:56 AM
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Hymn To the Fallen (Movie - Saving Private Ryan)

John Williams version


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