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Name that PLANE!

Old 01-28-20, 05:40 AM
  #1  
DannoXYZ 
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Name that PLANE!

Iím visiting some ancestral homes and find plane graveyard nearby. Donít have time to research, so figured Iíd tap Foo hive-mind. Whatís that cute little plane behind the MiG??? Thx





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Old 01-28-20, 07:18 AM
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That's a Dragonfly, the militarized version of the Cessna T-37 Tweet.
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Old 01-28-20, 10:21 AM
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I was gonna go with "a deer hunting plane" because of the camo.
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Old 01-28-20, 10:35 AM
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Proof in this internet-era that I, like many of my generation, went through a real "planes are hella cool" phase-- my ability to recognize that plane comes not from Google searching, but rather page 75 of Jane's American Fighting Aircraft of the 20th Century, 1991 edition



Or perhaps from page 195 of Jane's World Aircraft Recognition Handbook, 1987 edition?

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Old 01-28-20, 12:46 PM
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Yeah, I don't need no stinkin' internet to identify an airplane.

But then, dad says my first word was "jet", and I'm an aerospace engineer that works on planes and helicopters for a living.

True story of the time I got to do some work on a T-37: One of our clients in AZ had one they used for test flights, and they were testing a new "weather radar" for the Navy. They asked us to do some work for them in making the fairings around it more streamlined (they were getting really bad buffeting on the pod above 200 kts). But they forgot to blank out some of the technical details on the drawings they gave us.

Turns out the 'weather' radar was really a mass simulation radar. They hang it from a helicopter, fly it on the edge of the task force, and to a radar, it looks like a frigate or destroyer. It's basically a missile decoy.
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Old 01-28-20, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
That's a Dragonfly, the militarized version of the Cessna T-37 Tweet.
I used to see a lot of those Tweets fly up to Waco from San Antonio in the mid 1980s. Those things looked like all kinds of fun.
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Old 01-28-20, 04:14 PM
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Edmund.
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Old 01-28-20, 07:29 PM
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Worked on the trainer version. Fun wasn't something I would have said.... Suppose that came from the brilliance of USAF placing electronics in the (hot) hydraulics bay.
For the pilots it seemed a joy as a sub-sonic trainer. Wallowed like a pig and easily forgiving of mistakes. The T-38 (F-5) was a deathtrap (rock with engines and stubby wings).
Course the '37 screamed like a banshee with a migraine during her monthly cycle... while idling....
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Old 01-28-20, 08:26 PM
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Yeah, putting pylons and fuel tanks at end of wings increases polar moment-of-inertia and slows down responsiveness.

For better handling, wouldíve been better to have tank under belly and pull pylons closer to fuselage.

Cool that itís still used in S.America

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Old 01-28-20, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
Worked on the trainer version. Fun wasn't something I would have said.... Suppose that came from the brilliance of USAF placing electronics in the (hot) hydraulics bay.
For the pilots it seemed a joy as a sub-sonic trainer. Wallowed like a pig and easily forgiving of mistakes. The T-38 (F-5) was a deathtrap (rock with engines and stubby wings).
Course the '37 screamed like a banshee with a migraine during her monthly cycle... while idling....
That's AMERICAN, by God.
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Old 01-29-20, 10:30 AM
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It's still used here in the US, just not by the military.
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Old 01-29-20, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
Worked on the trainer version. Fun wasn't something I would have said.... Suppose that came from the brilliance of USAF placing electronics in the (hot) hydraulics bay.
For the pilots it seemed a joy as a sub-sonic trainer. Wallowed like a pig and easily forgiving of mistakes. The T-38 (F-5) was a deathtrap (rock with engines and stubby wings).
Course the '37 screamed like a banshee with a migraine during her monthly cycle... while idling....
T-37 was my first jet, T-38 was my second and then I instructed in the T-38 for 3 years. The T-37 was either too cold or too hot and always too loud. It was a 3 ton dog whistle with ancient aviation instrumentation that you had to learn despite the fact you would never see it again. It was also the only airplane that you could spin and I hated spins and I learned the hard way you should never do spins while recovering from an ear infection. Which is also why the inside of those jets smelled of jet fuel, hydraulic fluid, and a hint of puke. The A-37 used the same J85 motors (without the afterburner section) that the T-38 used and, according the guys I know that flew it, it was pretty darn impressive to fly but choked down fuel too quickly.

With 1,200 hours flying the thing, I would disagree the T-38 was a deathtrap although it, rather a student, would kill you in a heartbeat at low altitude if you failed to keep air flowing over the wing. In which case, it would very much fall like a rock. And that is why God invented afterburners and hopefully you had enough altitude for them to save you. I love flying that jet despite the times a student, the weather, the jet or myself caused a heart stopping event and an encounter with the great Chinese airman, HO LEE FUK.
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Old 01-29-20, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
the MiG??? Thx
MiG21
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Old 01-29-20, 09:21 PM
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The green cone and bit on the tail, combined with the hint of lettering that used to be under the cockpit lead me to guess that it's a third generation MiG-21 formerly of the Polish Air Force. They flew them for decades, and had a sizeable fleet.

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