Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Foo (https://www.bikeforums.net/foo/)
-   -   Wow, so many BS web sites out there... microwave... (https://www.bikeforums.net/foo/1206336-wow-so-many-bs-web-sites-out-there-microwave.html)

genec 07-01-20 10:46 PM

Wow, so many BS web sites out there... microwave...
 
OK, I am not asking for help. I have done this before, and have a strong technical background.


What this is, is a rant about the plethora of BS web sites out there that appear to offer help, manuals, parts and links, and instructions. OMG, it is a mindfield for the uninitiated.

In my case, I was hoping to verify the part and order it before I "dive in..." but I see I already have more knowledge and experience (with other brands, but similar construction microwaves) to simply open this up, determine the part number and get the part, much as I did before.

But to anyone else... good luck... so many websites, so little time and/or good info. So yeah, the web is full of misleading ads, seemingly helpful "manual" and parts sites, but... not really. Just pages and pages of misdirection and empty "give us your data" sites.

Well, off to get my screwdriver, and special bits... later.

FiftySix 07-02-20 09:58 AM

Yep. Looking up info for appliance repair can be frustrating. It helps me more if I can get a parts manual for the item in question so I can get part numbers.

Usually, there is an electrical schematic in the appliance itself, which helps sorting out the economy minded way that appliances tend to be wired compared to other types of equipment.

genec 07-02-20 11:06 AM


Originally Posted by FiftySix (Post 21565356)
Yep. Looking up info for appliance repair can be frustrating. It helps me more if I can get a parts manual for the item in question so I can get part numbers.

Usually, there is an electrical schematic in the appliance itself, which helps sorting out the economy minded way that appliances tend to be wired compared to other types of equipment.

Agreed on all counts... and some companies have well organized web sites that take you right to this sort of thing. Love that.

This is a simple repair... burned out bulb. Which in of itself is one of those items that should be user replaceable, but is buried in the cabinet, behind screws that most consumers do not have the means to access. And yeah, I pulled a dumb move and did a general search... and got back a plethora of crap. What amazed me was just how much of it was indeed "crap."

Some companies do have great support though. Love using their websites. And way way back in the day, Sears was great for their support. Not even too bad today. But all that is a different thread.

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 11:43 AM

Yup, I have a Branson tractor and is has been a great machine but the local dealer quit selling them. Anyways I can cross reference parts
like hydraulic filters, oil filters, stuff like that. PITA... Once I find a part that is compatible and write down the part number in a journal so when I need that part again I have no headaches. Endless worthless online manuals and part lists some very inaccurate. After I find the compatible part I go to tractor websites like this one and ask other people if this will work or not just to make sure.

genec 07-02-20 11:58 AM


Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel (Post 21565595)
Yup, I have a Branson tractor and is has been a great machine but the local dealer quit selling them. Anyways I can cross reference parts
like hydraulic filters, oil filters, stuff like that. PITA... Once I find a part that is compatible and write down the part number in a journal so when I need that part again I have no headaches. Endless worthless online manuals and part lists some very inaccurate. After I find the compatible part I go to tractor websites like this one and ask other people if this will work or not just to make sure.

I have a Yanmar diesel engine in my boat and tried to follow something similar with the "ships log," then Yanmar chose to change the numbers for some critical parts like the impeller, seals and oil filter. I do have the original manuals. But can't order parts based on those numbers. Just as soon as you think you've got it all figured out... someone comes along and moves it. GRIN

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 12:21 PM


Originally Posted by genec (Post 21565628)
I have a Yanmar diesel engine in my boat and tried to follow something similar with the "ships log," then Yanmar chose to change the numbers for some critical parts like the impeller, seals and oil filter. I do have the original manuals. But can't order parts based on those numbers. Just as soon as you think you've got it all figured out... someone comes along and moves it. GRIN

Post pic of youíre boat ... Iíd rather be on the water but the boat ramps are closed at the nearest lake.

GrainBrain 07-02-20 12:54 PM


Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel (Post 21565689)
Post pic of youíre boat ... Iíd rather be on the water but the boat ramps are closed at the nearest lake.

https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b57cac31d7.jpg
Sorry to thread hijack! Just hanging out today with the Mrs. :D

I hear you on the microwave genec . We have machine tools at work where the importer/mfg has long gone under, and you end up spending a couple days figuring out a function from trial and error.

genec 07-02-20 01:30 PM


Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel (Post 21565689)
Post pic of youíre boat ... Iíd rather be on the water but the boat ramps are closed at the nearest lake.

Not a great pic, I have others that are sharper... but it is what it represents and where I am when I took this.

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...678a9e33ed.jpg


This one may be a bit sharper...

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...59d99ad923.jpg

And me, doing what all boat owners do... working on the boat.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...22ba94bb63.jpg

jack pot 07-02-20 01:51 PM

^^^^^^ big like

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 01:57 PM


Originally Posted by GrainBrain (Post 21565753)
h
Sorry to thread hijack! Just hanging out today with the Mrs. :D

I hear you on the microwave genec . We have machine tools at work where the importer/mfg has long gone under, and you end up spending a couple days figuring out a function from trial and error.

NO FAIR NO FAIR NO FAIR :lol: Dang I want to be on the water itís already 100 here and climbing

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...eab26bfc4.jpeg

genec 07-02-20 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by FiftySix (Post 21565356)
Yep. Looking up info for appliance repair can be frustrating. It helps me more if I can get a parts manual for the item in question so I can get part numbers.

Usually, there is an electrical schematic in the appliance itself, which helps sorting out the economy minded way that appliances tend to be wired compared to other types of equipment.

I just found out why this search was so F'd up... Sanyo, the company, was bought up by Panasonic, which basically isn't supporting any of the older Sanyo products. So mergers and acquisitions, and the consumer is left holding the bag. Oh well, I'll open it up and see if I can find the part I need on the "open market." Shouldn't be that big of a deal... other than the darn MW is off line until I put it back together.

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 02:04 PM


Originally Posted by genec (Post 21565810)
Not a great pic, I have others that are sharper... but it is what it represents and where I am when I took this.

https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...678a9e33ed.jpg


This one may be a bit sharper...

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...59d99ad923.jpg

And me, doing what all boat owners do... working on the boat.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...22ba94bb63.jpg

Awesome! Donít see too many large sailboats here there are a few at the coast. BOAT= Break Out Another Thousand :lol: great pictures I can feel the dry cool air as I melt..

genec 07-02-20 02:15 PM

Just for grins... Here I am crewing on the race boat I was with for a number of years... Not my boat. My boat is a slow cruiser...

This was from a pic in the boat owners office. I am the 4th guy back in what is known as "hotbox" position... getting ready to control the tacklines and halyards during a sail change. The guy in white, at the mast is the "mastman" about to haul up the spinnaker. The guy in red at the bow is the "bowman," (has to bring the beer) and is critical for not only ensuring that the sail change is ready to go, but he also calls the starts as we approach the line. He's a damn good tactician too. The number 3 guy, in blue is on the mainsheet... former college quarterback... with lots of strength in his arms. Skipper isn't visible. Neither is the guy in the "sewer," who controls the spin when dousing.

This is "one design" racing, all the boats are the same, the crews, and boats are weighed. The sails are documented and registered. The idea is that the race is won by the most competent skipper and crew... there are no other "advantages." Otherwise known as "Corinthian Racing." Races are won and lost by seconds.

The boats in the background ARE that close. When rounding marks, upwind and downwind, you can practically walk from boat to boat.

I have raced on a number of boats over the years... and honestly, this one design racing was the best kind of competition. These are J-105s.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d6f90ba396.jpg

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 02:31 PM


Originally Posted by genec (Post 21565908)
Just for grins... Here I am crewing on the race boat I was with for a number of years... Not my boat. My boat is a slow cruiser...

This was from a pic in the boat owners office. I am the 4th guy back in what is known as "hotbox" position... getting ready to control the tacklines and halyards during a sail change. The guy in white, at the mast is the "mastman" about to haul up the spinnaker. The guy in red at the bow is the "bowman," (has to bring the beer) and is critical for not only ensuring that the sail change is ready to go, but he also calls the starts as we approach the line. He's a damn good tactician too. The number 3 guy, in blue is on the mainsheet... former college quarterback... with lots of strength in his arms. Skipper isn't visible. Neither is the guy in the "sewer," who controls the spin when dousing.

This is "one design" racing, all the boats are the same, the crews, and boats are weighed. The sails are documented and registered. The idea is that the race is won by the most competent skipper and crew... there are no other "advantages." Otherwise known as "Corinthian Racing." Races are won and lost by seconds.

The boats in the background ARE that close. When rounding marks, upwind and downwind, you can practically walk from boat to boat.

I have raced on a number of boats over the years... and honestly, this one design racing was the best kind of competition. These are J-105s.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d6f90ba396.jpg

Must be a blast. Iíve been on small sailboats but nothing like that. I saw windsurfers off the Oregon coast last summer and they were flying. What happens to the bowman If he forgets the beer or brings cheap beer? Having a former college QB doing the arm work couldnít hurt. How do you guys maintain discipline at sea? Walk the plank? Again awesome photo and Iím sure it a great rush to race those boats.

Hondo Gravel 07-02-20 02:38 PM

Great thread from Microwaves to messed up manuals, tractors, kayaks on lake with cold beer, then sailboats, then racing sailboats and then south Texas heat. All over the place and unpredictable the making of a great thread :lol:

genec 07-02-20 03:14 PM


Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel (Post 21565934)
Must be a blast. Iíve been on small sailboats but nothing like that. I saw windsurfers off the Oregon coast last summer and they were flying. What happens to the bowman If he forgets the beer or brings cheap beer? Having a former college QB doing the arm work couldnít hurt. How do you guys maintain discipline at sea? Walk the plank? Again awesome photo and Iím sure it a great rush to race those boats.

Bowman only forgot the beer once... and yeah, had to walk the plank.

Here's the thing... he can bring any beer he wants... Skipper brings ice chest and lunch. If Bowman brings bad beer, he gets ribbed terribly on the next race... At many points during the race we all sit side by side on "the rails." Even the skipper sits on the high side. When we sit like this... we make disparaging remarks about the bad beer choice. Even bad lunch choices.

I am the only one to have ever fallen off the boat... and they have never let me forget it. We had just changed sails, I was a bit delayed getting to the high side after ensuring all the lines were ready for the next sail change... as I went over the cabin top, we hit a bunch of chop and I bounced off the cabin and down the low side. Managed to grab the stanchion just as I went into the water. But I only had one hand on it and I was being dragged at about 7kts. No way to hang on.

As I went by the stern, the skipper asked if I was OK... I yelled "yeah!" He responded with "SWIM!" The following boat just missed me, the next boat back tacked off.

Well our boat could not just leave me there... They tossed out the MOB line (actually a sling buoy on a 100 foot line) as quickly as possible, and I swam to it. At the same time, they luffed the sails.

The ex quarterback got onto the MOB line and commenced hauling in as hard as he could; at the same time, they retrimmed the sails, and the boat got back up to speed.

I kept getting pulled under by the speed of the boat and the quarterback hauling me in, so I rolled over on my back and just hung on. As I got to the boat, and grabbed the ladder in back, my legs were constantly swept away by the rushing waters from under the boat. The ex quarterback reached down, grabbed my arms and hauled me onto the narrow "swim step" on the stern.

Skipper looked at me and asked if I was "good." Told him "yeah, water's warm." "OK, get back to position, we have a mark coming up..." We went from first to ninth in that race, but stayed right in it... and never lost a man.

They have never let me forget I was the only guy to fall in... and they'd "do it again" if I didn't do my job. :D

JonnyHK 07-03-20 01:57 PM


Originally Posted by genec (Post 21565810)

What is it?

Looks a lot like some boats that were popular at the sailing club I worked at. Taipan 20-something foot (28 sticks in my mind but I'm not sure).

desconhecido 07-03-20 02:07 PM

Back to appliance repair. My experiences with this sort of thing are with a GE refrigerator that we bought back in, I think, 1995. I've had good luck getting diagnostic and parts help on the internet. Fixed it at least 4 times including some sort of computer board and the auto defroster. There are about 3 gazilion websites with parts diagrams and there are real live GE fridge technicians posting diagnostic and repair info. But, this is a very, very common refrigerator.

genec 07-03-20 03:22 PM


Originally Posted by JonnyHK (Post 21567514)
What is it?

Looks a lot like some boats that were popular at the sailing club I worked at. Taipan 20-something foot (28 sticks in my mind but I'm not sure).

The 28 is a good guess.

It is a Pacific Seacraft Orion, 27 footer, with a 4 foot bowsprit. LOA 31, LWL 22.5 Cutter rigged by design, by Henry Mohrschladt. This is a 1981. A-layout with the U dinette. She's old, slow, and solid. Cutaway forefoot full keel drawing about 4 feet. I have a 13 HP Yanmar, it was new in 2005. The engine will push her to about 5.2 knots, I have sailed her to just over 7, she is great on a reach, with all cloth flying. (and a hell of a thrill) The foresails all furl, the main just folds down. I tried lazy jacks, but it was just a hassle... the main folds down easily when the track is well lubricated... twice a year, a bit of SailKote does the trick.

I never liked wheels on small boats; she is steered by tiller. I love that responsive feeling. I have an AP, but it came with the boat, and has some issues. I currently rig lines and bungees for longer trips and then just balance the sails to hold course.

I had sailed a number of boats through Harbor Sailboats in San Diego. (I highly recommend them as both a sailing school and charter club) I found boat sizes and features I liked, and started doing some further study... I have sailed boats from 22 feet in length to 54 feet. I find 36-38 foot to be quite perfect... but the economy and ability to easily single hand a 27 footer made the Orion the best choice for me. She is quite comfortable below.

I like the idea of single handing a smaller boat, and the notion of a cutter rig for easy sail handing. I have done some work on her myself, and had all the standing rigging replaced in 2015, along with refinishing the mast. I replaced all her rode in 2014... 100' of chain and 250 of three strand. She has a new VHF with MMSI. Like all vintage boats, I have a long list of repair and maintenance items. She gets hauled once a year... that and slip fees, are my biggest expenses.

I lived aboard for several months in 2015, but currently she is on a private dock in the Salish Sea.

Here is a review... Pacific Seacraft Orion 27

genec 07-03-20 03:30 PM


Originally Posted by desconhecido (Post 21567536)
Back to appliance repair. My experiences with this sort of thing are with a GE refrigerator that we bought back in, I think, 1995. I've had good luck getting diagnostic and parts help on the internet. Fixed it at least 4 times including some sort of computer board and the auto defroster. There are about 3 gazilion websites with parts diagrams and there are real live GE fridge technicians posting diagnostic and repair info. But, this is a very, very common refrigerator.

The 3 gazallion websites are more problem than they are worth. Find a site you like that has the techs answering your hard questions. And find good diagrams. Then forget the 2.9 gazalliaon other sites. Have you looked at GE site directly? If the company is still in business, that may help. My rant forced me to discover that Sanyo is no longer Sanyo... Sold to Panasonic, and they don't care... so the vultures came in.

I have since decided to not even bother... it is in a rental apartment... so I'll just call the landlord or work something out if it really bugs me.

But I bet GE may still give support... or maybe Sears, if you got it from them.

JonnyHK 07-04-20 07:47 AM


Originally Posted by genec (Post 21567653)
The 28 is a good guess.

It is a Pacific Seacraft Orion, 27 footer, with a 4 foot bowsprit. LOA 31, LWL 22.5 Cutter rigged by design, by Henry Mohrschladt. This is a 1981. A-layout with the U dinette. She's old, slow, and solid. Cutaway forefoot full keel drawing about 4 feet. I have a 13 HP Yanmar, it was new in 2005. The engine will push her to about 5.2 knots, I have sailed her to just over 7, she is great on a reach, with all cloth flying. (and a hell of a thrill) The foresails all furl, the main just folds down. I tried lazy jacks, but it was just a hassle... the main folds down easily when the track is well lubricated... twice a year, a bit of SailKote does the trick.

I never liked wheels on small boats; she is steered by tiller. I love that responsive feeling. I have an AP, but it came with the boat, and has some issues. I currently rig lines and bungees for longer trips and then just balance the sails to hold course.

I had sailed a number of boats through Harbor Sailboats in San Diego. (I highly recommend them as both a sailing school and charter club) I found boat sizes and features I liked, and started doing some further study... I have sailed boats from 22 feet in length to 54 feet. I find 36-38 foot to be quite perfect... but the economy and ability to easily single hand a 27 footer made the Orion the best choice for me. She is quite comfortable below.

I like the idea of single handing a smaller boat, and the notion of a cutter rig for easy sail handing. I have done some work on her myself, and had all the standing rigging replaced in 2015, along with refinishing the mast. I replaced all her rode in 2014... 100' of chain and 250 of three strand. She has a new VHF with MMSI. Like all vintage boats, I have a long list of repair and maintenance items. She gets hauled once a year... that and slip fees, are my biggest expenses.

I lived aboard for several months in 2015, but currently she is on a private dock in the Salish Sea.

Here is a review... Pacific Seacraft Orion 27


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipan_28

General lines are fairly similar, but I guess both trying to solve the similar problems!

genec 07-04-20 08:02 AM


Originally Posted by JonnyHK (Post 21568502)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taipan_28

General lines are fairly similar, but I guess both trying to solve the similar problems!

All boats are compromises... it all comes down to what you choose to compromise for.

My boat is very seakindly, comfortable below, and easily singlehanded. The smaller individual sails of the cutter rig are quite easily controlled by a single sailor. And no wheel gives plenty of space in the cockpit. We say "cocktails for six, dinner for four, sleeps two.'

I think the specs say sleeps 4... but not comfortably.

She is not fast... but handles well.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:36 AM.


Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.