Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Fridge Spigot advice

Notices
Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Fridge Spigot advice

Old 03-14-21, 10:01 AM
  #1  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
Fridge Spigot advice

Our fridge died, so we bought a new one, this time with ice and water. The delivery guy took one look at the spigot and said basically 'do not touch that or it might start leaking and you're screwed. call a plumber and replace it'



I see wrench flats, and it looks like it would not be hard to replace, just (shut the water off), screw it off, screw a new one one. I replaced my own water pressure regulator once, would it be any harder than that? Could it be soldered on? Or need to be soldered back on?
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 10:04 AM
  #2  
ahsposo 
Rock Hard Member
 
ahsposo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Outside the Box
Posts: 7,135

Bikes: A Home Built All Rounder, Bianchi 928, Specialized Langster, Dahon Folder

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5287 Post(s)
Liked 2,426 Times in 1,463 Posts
I'd try to replace it myself and if I screwed it up call a plumber.

I'd probably fill a bathtub with water first...
ahsposo is offline  
Likes For ahsposo:
Old 03-14-21, 10:11 AM
  #3  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
by your new avatar, are you saying you're as smart as a box of rocks (by the looks of that box, all the smart rocks have been taken out)
RubeRad is offline  
Likes For RubeRad:
Old 03-14-21, 10:20 AM
  #4  
Hondo Gravel
Basically Psychotic
 
Hondo Gravel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 2,052

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1925 Post(s)
Liked 1,988 Times in 1,272 Posts
Soak it with penetrating oil for a few days. I do most of my own plumbing but with corroded pipes inside the home where the sheet rock and tile would be damaged if it breaks. IMO I would leave this to a professional plumber installing a new pipe and faucet.
Hondo Gravel is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 02:11 PM
  #5  
ahsposo 
Rock Hard Member
 
ahsposo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Outside the Box
Posts: 7,135

Bikes: A Home Built All Rounder, Bianchi 928, Specialized Langster, Dahon Folder

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5287 Post(s)
Liked 2,426 Times in 1,463 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
by your new avatar, are you saying you're as smart as a box of rocks (by the looks of that box, all the smart rocks have been taken out)
No, the intellectual firepower of a collection of small, smooth stones would defeat me. I know my limitations.

In any case, do like Hondo and drink plenty of beer before you get started.
ahsposo is offline  
Likes For ahsposo:
Old 03-14-21, 02:23 PM
  #6  
Hondo Gravel
Basically Psychotic
 
Hondo Gravel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 2,052

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1925 Post(s)
Liked 1,988 Times in 1,272 Posts
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
No, the intellectual firepower of a collection of small, smooth stones would defeat me. I know my limitations.

In any case, do like Hondo and drink plenty of beer before you get started.
beer and plumbing go together it makes digging in mud more pleasant.
Hondo Gravel is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 03:26 PM
  #7  
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Posts: 26,711

Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10179 Post(s)
Liked 2,237 Times in 1,548 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Our fridge died, so we bought a new one, this time with ice and water. The delivery guy took one look at the spigot and said basically 'do not touch that or it might start leaking and you're screwed. call a plumber and replace it'



I see wrench flats, and it looks like it would not be hard to replace, just (shut the water off), screw it off, screw a new one one. I replaced my own water pressure regulator once, would it be any harder than that? Could it be soldered on? Or need to be soldered back on?
Honestly, it looks like the sort of thing that is going to break in the wall... Plumbing is one of those things... the bits we need all stick through the wall, but the stuff that breaks inevitably is inside the wall. On the plus side, you can likely tear through the dry wall in this case, make what ever amateur repairs you are brave enough to undertake, slap on some new drywall, and then cover up your "fine workmanship" with a refrigerator, and probably get away with it. Go for it.

It's when this sort of thing involves that "special" bathroom tile, that these issues become "sticky." I have a long horror story about such a thing, and how we saved it by using "accent tile," where no "accent" existed previously.

With that in mind... I suggest anyone planning a house should take a look at putting things like closets (ie access panels) on walls behind shower fixtures... not other equally important tiled bath areas...
oh my.

Yeah, water walls are an interesting idea... but so too is "access.."
genec is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 03:47 PM
  #8  
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,738

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter, Volae Team, Priority Eight, Nimbus MUni, Trek Roscoe 6.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 420 Post(s)
Liked 844 Times in 431 Posts
Borderline if I'd do it, but if I did I'd start in the morning. This is not a project to start an hour or two before the plumbing supply stores close.

I'm no longer young and poor, so paying someone who has better skills and better tools to screw around with a fricking mess down by the floor, that's pretty compelling.
downtube42 is offline  
Likes For downtube42:
Old 03-14-21, 03:48 PM
  #9  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
Thanks y'all. I bought some parts at Lowe's, they assured me it should be screw-off/screw-on, but getting back there, got wrenches on that collar and the wrench flats above it (can't tell in the photo higher up is also hex), and could not budge it, was startin to worry about rupturing something. Maybe a hernia, more seriously in the house.

So I am indeed going to call in the cavalry. Let a local craftsman earn some coin in these troubled times.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 03:57 PM
  #10  
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Posts: 26,711

Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10179 Post(s)
Liked 2,237 Times in 1,548 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Thanks y'all. I bought some parts at Lowe's, they assured me it should be screw-off/screw-on, but getting back there, got wrenches on that collar and the wrench flats above it (can't tell in the photo higher up is also hex), and could not budge it, was startin to worry about rupturing something. Maybe a hernia, more seriously in the house.

So I am indeed going to call in the cavalry. Let a local craftsman earn some coin in these troubled times.
Of course they did... and their "reference" is homes built within the last 10 years, for which they likely have parts... But of course your home was built outside that magic window, and will require parts from "Phils Ole Neighborhood Plumbing Shoppe." (the only place to find odd washers, screw threads and ancient fixtures...)
genec is offline  
Old 03-14-21, 06:36 PM
  #11  
skidder
Bipsycorider
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,290

Bikes: Why yes, I do have a few! Thank you for asking!

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 607 Post(s)
Liked 347 Times in 252 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Our fridge died, so we bought a new one, this time with ice and water. The delivery guy took one look at the spigot and said basically 'do not touch that or it might start leaking and you're screwed. call a plumber and replace it'



I see wrench flats, and it looks like it would not be hard to replace, just (shut the water off), screw it off, screw a new one one. I replaced my own water pressure regulator once, would it be any harder than that? Could it be soldered on? Or need to be soldered back on?
That thing looks so old the valve has probably corroded itself onto the pipe in the wall and you won't get it off with a wrench. I'll bet a plumber would just suggest replacing the whole thing (I would). I'd cut out a portion of the wall around it, cut off the water feed pipe with the valve still attached, and toss it in the trash. I'd solder on new copper fittings including a screw flange for a new valve for the refrigerator water valve, and patch the drywall. Not a simple job, but I would do it myself (I can solder copper piping up to 1" diameter).
skidder is offline  
Likes For skidder:
Old 03-15-21, 10:27 AM
  #12  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
House built '95, spigot unused since at least 2010, unknown before that.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-15-21, 10:38 AM
  #13  
noisebeam
Arizona Dessert
 
noisebeam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: AZ
Posts: 14,961

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix, Lemond Poprad. Retired: Jamis Sputnik, Centurion LeMans Fixed, Diamond Back ascent ex

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4959 Post(s)
Liked 1,617 Times in 965 Posts
I have same configuration behind my fridge in 1978 home. I am sure if I turned it on it would leak and/or never turn off again as water here is very hard.

But I never connect and instead remove the ice maker from my past two fridges for more storage space. I find auto ice more hassle than benefit especially with need to frequently replace filters.
noisebeam is online now  
Old 03-15-21, 11:16 AM
  #14  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,714

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1630 Post(s)
Liked 1,232 Times in 812 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Thanks y'all. I bought some parts at Lowe's, they assured me it should be screw-off/screw-on, but getting back there, got wrenches on that collar and the wrench flats above it (can't tell in the photo higher up is also hex), and could not budge it, was startin to worry about rupturing something. Maybe a hernia, more seriously in the house.

So I am indeed going to call in the cavalry. Let a local craftsman earn some coin in these troubled times.
Propane torch will soften up the pipe dope and loosen things up. drain first so you're not just heating water. I've taken apart a lot worse stuff than that.
1/4 turn ball valve as the new unit. As said, never start a plumbing job when the hardware store will close.
dedhed is offline  
Old 03-15-21, 11:23 AM
  #15  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
yeah thx, I don't have a torch, and am not up for buying one just for this job. There's a certain amount of stuff I'll DIY, this is definitely over the line.

> never start a plumbing job when the hardware store will close.

lol I did take the precaution of filling 2 pitchers with fresh water, in case we had to leave the water turned off for a day
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-15-21, 11:53 AM
  #16  
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Posts: 26,711

Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10179 Post(s)
Liked 2,237 Times in 1,548 Posts
Originally Posted by noisebeam View Post
I have same configuration behind my fridge in 1978 home. I am sure if I turned it on it would leak and/or never turn off again as water here is very hard.

But I never connect and instead remove the ice maker from my past two fridges for more storage space. I find auto ice more hassle than benefit especially with need to frequently replace filters.
I have a very interesting kludge in my 1968 home... The valve is in a nearby pantry, but the copper line runs from the pantry, behind the wall, under a flooring threshold, to the refrigerator... copper, right to the back of the fridge. It should go to a box in the wall as shown in the OP and then be rigid plastic. But no... copper, run in this very makeshift manner. I turned it off about 4 years ago, pulled the icemaker about a year ago (hey, more room) and use trays for ice in the summer months. One of these days I will rip out that pantry, and get a new fridge... then there will be some real changes.

I have to agree regarding the filters... I had a Sears "branded" fridge back in the last house, and it seems like those filters had to be changed about every 6 months or so, and were quite expensive... around $40 or so. And ice through the door just caused messes on the floor.
genec is offline  
Old 03-15-21, 11:59 AM
  #17  
momoman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 150

Bikes: 2013 Wilier Gran Turismo, 1983 Trek 760, 80's Colnago Super, 90's De Rosa SLX, 2009 Waterford 22 Series Singlespeed, 85 Medici Pro Strada, De Rosa Alumino frameset, Dave Molten Fuso frameset, 70's beater Peugeot PX10

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked 121 Times in 54 Posts
Have the plumber install a washerless or quarter turn shut off valve. The person living in your home 20 years from now will thank you.

A few years ago I replaced all the cheaper multi-turn angle valves in my 4 Ba house. Some of the valves had started leaking. They were about 20 yrs old and installed when we did a whole house remodel. Hopefully Iíll never need to replace another angle valve in my home again.
momoman is offline  
Old 03-15-21, 12:40 PM
  #18  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
The male/female replacements I bought are quarter-turn, there were no full-circle screw-in handle options available, I expect the plumber will not try to replace with identical equipment.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 05:56 AM
  #19  
J.Higgins 
Mentally Derailleured
 
J.Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 2,334

Bikes: Bilenky Tourlite, Surly Ogre

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1184 Post(s)
Liked 476 Times in 325 Posts
Hey RubeRad Is that a copper pipe? I was going to suggest using one of these in the appropriate size...

https://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBit...LFBN/314810029

However, looking at the close quarters that you have to work with, I think a plumber should be called in. they have the tools and experience to deal with tight tolerances. I'm no plumber, but I have done a lot of plumbing in my day. I married the plumber's daughter, and when I was a kid, he'd take me on jobs and I helped him a lot.
__________________
Cargo Bike Build: https://www.bikeforums.net/utility-cycling/1228207-grocery-getter-build.html#post22024218
Trek T50 Tandem Build: https://www.bikeforums.net/tandem-cycling/1230829-trek-t50-tandem-test.html#post22066351

Remember, its just a beer commercial. That kind of happiness may not be obtainable.
J.Higgins is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 09:31 AM
  #20  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
no idea, it looks painted to me. Plumber's coming Thu to inspect and quote
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 09:51 AM
  #21  
TakingMyTime
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Posts: 2,046

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX, 5200 & 7700

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 768 Post(s)
Liked 529 Times in 328 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
no idea, it looks painted to me. Plumber's coming Thu to inspect and quote
We expect a report back with pics once it's done.

I myself would not attempt it. I'm not mechanically inclined enough to do some of these things properly. There have been several times I looked at something thinking I could fix it, had all the moves in my head, and then when the plumber comes out to fix it I realize I wasn't even close in my understanding of the problem and the procedure needed to fix it.
TakingMyTime is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 10:07 AM
  #22  
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Posts: 26,711

Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10179 Post(s)
Liked 2,237 Times in 1,548 Posts
Originally Posted by TakingMyTime View Post
We expect a report back with pics once it's done.

I myself would not attempt it. I'm not mechanically inclined enough to do some of these things properly. There have been several times I looked at something thinking I could fix it, had all the moves in my head, and then when the plumber comes out to fix it I realize I wasn't even close in my understanding of the problem and the procedure needed to fix it.
I recently added a circuit to my electrical panel... for an outside GFCI outlet. I had done all the wire pulling and conduit work and the last part was actually wiring into the panel... My biggest fear was that when I opened the panel it was going to be a nightmare... I steeled myself for that, had an assistant with a good flashlight... expecting to have to unweave a mess to get the new circuit in.

Much to my surprise, it was neat and orderly, as if I had done it myself... it had all the marks of a professional... took me just minutes to wire in. Took longer to remove the cover than to put in the breaker and new wire. My partner exclaimed "wow that was fast, it was like you knew what you were doing..."

I had done this sort of thing many times before... so indeed I had the knowledge... but this was a panel I had never seen the inside of before... and that caused the anxiety. In the end, "no problemo."
genec is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 10:13 AM
  #23  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
Thread Starter
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,442

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 1,188 Times in 891 Posts
happy ending, but weird to me that you would not have looked in the panel first before deciding whether to tackle the job
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 10:28 AM
  #24  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,620

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 280 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21108 Post(s)
Liked 4,012 Times in 2,940 Posts
Originally Posted by noisebeam View Post
I have same configuration behind my fridge in 1978 home. I am sure if I turned it on it would leak and/or never turn off again as water here is very hard.

But I never connect and instead remove the ice maker from my past two fridges for more storage space. I find auto ice more hassle than benefit especially with need to frequently replace filters.
...I go this route as well. 90% of the issues people seem to experience with their refrigerators these days are related to the ice maker or the plumbing. Not worth it to me.

Originally Posted by momoman View Post
Have the plumber install a washerless or quarter turn shut off valve. The person living in your home 20 years from now will thank you.
.
...the ready availability of ball valve shutoffs is one of the blessings of buying all our stuff from China now.

Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
no idea, it looks painted to me. Plumber's coming Thu to inspect and quote
...I think, depending on the sort of plumbing that you have in your house, and the age of it, that might be a very easy job, or a very difficult one. Those wrench flats you mentioned are on there to access the packing around the valve stem, which is what keeps those valves from leaking. The packing dries out, and sometimes needs replacement. Which is why turning it on after all these years off is a bad idea.

If you have copper plumbing, it's usually not a big deal to replace something like that. Very often the thing is plumbed with a male fitting soldered onto the pipe end, and the valve itself twists off with a pipe wrench. But there other methods of connection for that valve that have evolved over the years, some of which involve flaring and a ring gasket.

If it's an older California house, built n the era of galvanized steel plumbing, genec has already clued you in about how easy it is to either break or twist loose another joint up in the wall somewhere. Which is kind of a downer, because you have to turn off the water at the main entry shutoff to work on this, and until you have it back together not leaking, or temporarily capped, you can't turn it back on again. This makes everyone you live with cranky.

Your main problem working on that is that someone did all the kitchen finish work after it was already plumbed in, and didn't leave you much in the way of access. The plumber will probably give you one estimate for "if I don't run into other problems", and another one for "if I do run into other problems". I agree with the person who said that when they were poor, they did this stuff themselves, but it looks different when you have a little cash reserve.

If you are really poor, my advice would be to go with noisebeam solution, and use ice trays if you want ice. I never understood the attraction of cold water from the fridge door. Just one more thing in my life to break.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 03-16-21, 10:35 AM
  #25  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,620

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 280 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21108 Post(s)
Liked 4,012 Times in 2,940 Posts
Originally Posted by genec View Post
I recently added a circuit to my electrical panel... for an outside GFCI outlet. I had done all the wire pulling and conduit work and the last part was actually wiring into the panel... My biggest fear was that when I opened the panel it was going to be a nightmare... I steeled myself for that, had an assistant with a good flashlight... expecting to have to unweave a mess to get the new circuit in.
...the last house I remodeled here was built out in 1920. Over the years, someone had modified the knob and tube wiring by somehow patching in a breaker box sort of close to where the mains power came into the house. It was a nightmare. In retrospect, I probably should have done all the interior destruction needed to rewire the entire place, but I was under some time and budget pressures.

I ride past it sometimes on my bike, when I am over in that direction. It hasn't burned down yet, 30 years later. And the people who live there are happy with the kitchen.
3alarmer is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.