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Must've been a cow in previous life...

Old 06-02-21, 02:41 PM
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Juan Foote
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Must've been a cow in previous life...

I don't know what it is, but I do not seem to be capable of having a nice yard of grass here. We moved here in 14-ish (I totally can't recall) and had a bunch of trees taken out, got this guy to come over with a tractor to smooth and "rockhound" the yard. We layed down pre-emergent, seeded, put out hay and had the most BEE U TEE FULL yard for all of a month or so.
Shortly after this we discovered that the enormous Oak tree we had to have cut out in front had grown roots into the "T" of the septic tank. The tree was basically keeping it empty without much need of the field. Once it was cut down the tank overfilled and backed up. So, entire front yard dug up, field replaced and so forth. We had the whole front yard redone and it was in hay and seed when (I cannot recall exactly) something came through here that dropped SO much rain in a short time and washed gullies in the front yard. I went out and laid down little dams made of sticks and stones. A method often used in drainage ditches, and that I learned in the Boy Scouts...anywho, the yard recovers to some degree but has always been tentative.
Big drought, too hot, too much rain, been fighting it with the sprinkler hose....got things back to looking somewhat decent this last year and in particular after the addition of some Bermuda and sand. Awesome. Decided to follow that up again this year. Overseeded the front again and some weird weed is growing everywhere I seeded. It makes these dandelion-esce fluffy seed pods and gets everywhere. It has within a couple of months taken over the whole front yard. I have a mind to weed and feed (again) for the year, but am afraid at this point that I will then be back to mud again. Nothing like cutting a dust cloud.

I think I am going to go hijack one of those hydroseed trucks that do the construction sites. I guess if they catch me I won't have to cut it anyway.
Home ownership is the bomb.
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Old 06-02-21, 02:42 PM
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One word: Turf
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Old 06-02-21, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
One word: Turf

Like outdoor carpet of the "Astro" variety, lol?

What does it cost to asphalt a parking lot?
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Old 06-02-21, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Juan Foote View Post
Like outdoor carpet of the "Astro" variety, lol?

What does it cost to asphalt a parking lot?
Well, that is one solution... but I was thinking more along the lines of sod. https://sodsolutions.com/lawn-care-g...r-grass-types/

Roll it out, water it... Instant lawn.
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Old 06-02-21, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
Well, that is one solution... but I was thinking more along the lines of sod. https://sodsolutions.com/lawn-care-g...r-grass-types/

Roll it out, water it... Instant lawn.

Yeah, I would be perfectly happy with some good, thick fescue when you come down to it. My yard has every condition known to the state of GA, lol. There is no way that my lazy a..butt...is going to spring for sod to take care of. No sir.

The reason I opted for Bermuda and or Centipede for the front is the sheer amount of sun it's going to take during the day. Even at that I have to go with various types of Fescue and even Rye to handle the differing conditions. I have come recently to find that Millet grows quite well here too, but it's ability to be cut like grass is very limited. Did very well this past winter in keeping the back yard from washing out. It, is a whole different story.
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Old 06-02-21, 04:19 PM
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If I was starting over, I'd avoid grass. It's possible to tastefully landscape without grass...
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Old 06-02-21, 05:06 PM
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i hate lawn maintenance & would prefer to not have any organic upkeep. The cost to pave the area would likely be the same as removing what you have, laying sod, & installing an irrigation system. Paving would likely be less to maintain over the course of its life too.
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Old 06-02-21, 06:11 PM
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Build some raised beds, fill with soil and raise vegetables. Crushed granite between the beds.
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Old 06-02-21, 06:45 PM
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Juan.

What do you know about permaculture? Soil health?

Mycorrhiza fungus and legumes? Clover?
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Old 06-02-21, 06:54 PM
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Some other rancher in the upper Midwest? Big guy, anti monoculture grass, forgot his name.
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Old 06-02-21, 06:57 PM
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Find out what’s wrong with your soil.
Plant something you like, that helps with your soil deficiency. Likely not a traditional grass.


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Old 06-03-21, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mtnbud View Post
If I was starting over, I'd avoid grass. It's possible to tastefully landscape without grass...
Some HOAs won't let you go any other route... they want their picket fence with a green lawn for the entire neighborhood. They may even control the color of your house. I lived in such a development back in '85-'95. Funny thing was, every year, at the annual meeting, there was this one guy that put forth the idea of abolishing the HOA.
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Old 06-03-21, 10:05 AM
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Having a monoculture is difficult, especially with maintaining grass in the manicured way we Americans seem to like it -- it's a lot of work and money. I have neighbors that have manicured lawns and they have a couple different trucks come by with fertilizers and various x-icides and it keeps most things out, but they do have some weeds and some very large brown spots from what I believe is some type of grub eating at their roots. This can all be fixed, but at a cost of more time, energy and money. Furthermore they use much more water just to keep the stuff green.

I don't water my plants, because I build up the soil to hold water during the dry periods and if I get heavy down falls in rain, I have zero soil runoff -- rain water does not flow from my yard, regardless how much rain I get.

The plants in the foreground are all native and didn't cost me a cent to plant. I know it's not for everyone, but I get so much food out of this yard and see so much wildlife and it changes every year, never the same old boring look from year to year.
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Old 06-03-21, 10:26 AM
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Like many others have indicated, you may appreciate your yard more if you stop fighting it; https://extension.uga.edu/publicatio...0Woody%20Vines
After 15 years of working as a landscaper the last thing I wanted to do with my own yard is mow the lawn.
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Old 06-03-21, 10:35 AM
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Next house I own will have one small patch of turf grass, just for small children. If at all.

Heres the key.
It will have clover mixed in.
It will be allowed to go to seed.
If and when I mow it, it will only get bagged (carbon and nutrition stripped) a few times a year for special occasions.
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Old 06-03-21, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by SkinGriz View Post
Next house I own will have one small patch of turf grass, just for small children. If at all.
Heres the key.
It will have clover mixed in.
It will be allowed to go to seed.
If and when I mow it, it will only get bagged (carbon and nutrition stripped) a few times a year for special occasions.
We are lucky enough to be across the street from one of the larger parks in my city. My son could run over to the park and have free reign on all the nicest turf grass around.
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Old 06-03-21, 12:25 PM
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Unless you want lawn for playing fetch with the pooch, or playing yard games, why have it. It's high maintenance. You can't eat it. It's not native and does nothing for the pollinators that help us grow our food.

I'm the guy on the block whose amount of lawn shrinks more every year. More permaculture. Less lawn. I expect that if/when I sell this house, the next owner will have everything scraped clean and plant effing grass. Sigh.
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Old 06-03-21, 02:39 PM
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When we had a rural place on a lakefront here in Texas we put St. Augustine grass on the acre nearest the lake because it's hardy stuff that tends to choke out weeds, and does well in shade, especially in hot humid climates. And St. Augustine spreads pretty well on its own in optimal conditions.

But most of the 3 acres we encouraged to revert to native Texas prairie flora. I'd mow paths where needed and kept islands of native grasses and wildflowers, including milkweed for the migrating Monarch butterflies.

It can take up to three years for significant reversion to native flora, so the tricky part is doing enough mowing and trimming to keep it from looking weedy. Once it grows in we'd cultivate and encourage the plants that looked good and served a purpose for the wildlife, and chop out the other stuff.

And we usually discouraged Bermuda grass since it tended to be home to chiggers. Fire ants seemed to prefer Bermuda over St. Augustine too.
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Old 06-03-21, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
When we had a rural place on a lakefront here in Texas we put St. Augustine grass on the acre nearest the lake because it's hardy stuff that tends to choke out weeds, and does well in shade, especially in hot humid climates. And St. Augustine spreads pretty well on its own in optimal conditions.

But most of the 3 acres we encouraged to revert to native Texas prairie flora. I'd mow paths where needed and kept islands of native grasses and wildflowers, including milkweed for the migrating Monarch butterflies.

It can take up to three years for significant reversion to native flora, so the tricky part is doing enough mowing and trimming to keep it from looking weedy. Once it grows in we'd cultivate and encourage the plants that looked good and served a purpose for the wildlife, and chop out the other stuff.

And we usually discouraged Bermuda grass since it tended to be home to chiggers. Fire ants seemed to prefer Bermuda over St. Augustine too.
Chiggers aka red bugs in my part of Texas lol and those FIREANTS! Chiggers are worse than ticks. Every crack and crease they will get you and once embedded you are getting a needle or tweezers to remove them. Sometimes a FRIKIN lighter to get them to move so you could remove them. Fire Ants got rid of most of the ticks and in S Texas most of the chiggers but before we had fire ants it was bad.
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