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Roofing vs Hospital Bills

Old 08-25-21, 01:52 PM
  #1  
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Roofing vs Hospital Bills

I opted to hire a roofer to fix the roof. They did a great job. If I got on the roof I would have been there for month and if I fell it would have been much more expensive than hiring a pro. 6 roofers fixed everything in one day and part of the next morning. DONE. Im use to fixing everything myself but in this case it was wise to hiring this one out to professionals. Previous owner fell off the roof broke both arms his wife had to wipe his behind for 3 months. They laugh about it now but it wasnt funny back then they said. Neighbors who were here when that happened made me promise to stay off the roof it is cursed. A heck of a lot cheaper than hospital bills or a funeral lol.
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Old 08-25-21, 02:06 PM
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Here in Canada we don't have to worry about hospital bills.

The cost of me fixing my roof on my own would likely be the cost of water damage resulting from an improperly fixed roof, plus the cost of getting someone to do it properly. Also calculate in all the time I would have to spend off work with two broken arms, and the cost of a divorce about two days into expecting my wife to wipe my arse.
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Old 08-25-21, 02:24 PM
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I have done a few roofs in my day. I will gladly hire professionals to do it. Lousy, hard, hot job.
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Old 08-25-21, 02:28 PM
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I forgot to add I wouldn’t know I was doing made the roof worse.
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Old 08-25-21, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I forgot to add I wouldnt know I was doing made the roof worse.
At my current home there is a skylight in the bathroom, it was made of some manner of plastic and did not leak. Our homeowners insurance made us replace it as a non standard installation....well, it was at some point because half the houses on my street....anyway, replaced it and caused a couple of hundred dollars in water damage to the bathroom ceiling. Still have to have someone out to fix the stipple. I tried fixing it twice, even had a roofer friend come try. That is why we now have a beautiful new architectural shingle roof.
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Old 08-25-21, 02:46 PM
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Reminds me of the old joke...

A lawyer and an engineer were fishing in the Caribbean. The lawyer
said, “I’m here because my house burned down, and everything I owned was
destroyed by the fire. The insurance company paid for everything.”

“That’s quite a coincidence,” said the engineer. “I’m here because my
house and all my belongings were destroyed by a flood, and my insurance
company also paid for everything.”

The lawyer puzzedly asked, “How do you start a flood?
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Old 08-25-21, 03:03 PM
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Most of the professional roofers I've talked to have fallen off a time or two.

I have to go on roofs occasionally for work - but they buy me all the safety stuff including CougarPaws.
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Old 08-25-21, 10:24 PM
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I make it a point to speak with neighbors who are attempting something risky themselves. I know that perhaps some might think that I'm an A hole for asking them if they know what the hell that they are doing and pointing out some things that they should consider in both their method(s) and equipment & tools. The way that I look at it is if you know anything that might be helpful and potentially help someone avoid a potential catastrophe, or at least help them proceed with their DIY homerepair, tree cutting or car repair in the safest possible manner.

About ten years ago, after a winter storm brought down a few trees and tree limbs etc. A great guy that was a great tennis player, and avid cyclist and a great father to four young children, decides to take it upon himself to cut the limbs himself that were across his driveway and broken limbs of several pine trees that were about 20 ft in the air above his driveway. What seemed easy to him, killed him. He fell and hit the driveway below and then survived for almost three days. He wasn't a dumbass. He was a dentist with his own practice. He had just turned 41 years old. He didn't want to wait as there was no reason as their home had power (the entire neighborhood had power). He was impatient I guess because limbs blocked his driveway, but hell they could still exit their garage and then drive across the lawn to the street if they needed to go anywhere. Nobody was going anywhere as in the South if you get five inches of snow, its a three day party of doing nothing, as everything shuts down for a day if there is 3/4 of an inch of snow. He obviously felt that doing the limb cutting was super-simple and it possibly might have been, under normal dry conditions. It is a wonder that none of his neighbors or his wife, said Ted, just wait, as this doesn't need to be done today under these conditions. His condition was grave with little chance of survival as his skull was fractured badly among other injuries but he survived nearly three days. I can only guess what the hospital bills were but who really cares about that if the outcome results in survival with near full mobility and excellent quality of life. Sadly, in many cases, there is no way to put Humpty Dumpty back together again and young athletic, fit folks die from multiple severe injuries incurred in a fall.

I always stop when I see someone doing work on their car supported by concrete cinder blocks. I don't care if it is in another city in the worst part of town or near the airport and I'm almost late to catch the flight. Many times, nobody has told them the hazards and they don't know that cinder blocks can crumble and crack and the person under the car gets crushed when the car drops on their chest.
Hey, if you were once the dumbass, who learned through the school of hard knocks or whatever, you should try to share your knowledge with those that may be doing their work in a very risky or unsafe manner. Recently, I convinced a neighbor that wanted to paint his home while on ladders, to use sturdy interconnected scaffolding instead. He didn't want the unsightly scaffolding. I told Walter that nobody is gonna care if the scaffolding is up for two weeks or even three. Nobody wants to see you fall from a ladder. Do it safely, and just rent the scaffolding, and if you need any help, Preston, Will and I will be glad to help you get it set up. Hell, you can use my truck anytime that you need to pickup stuff from Lowes/Home Depot or Building Supply place etc........just let me know because sometimes you know we keep the truck at our lake house. Try to be a good neighbor and not a jerk. I'd rather be thought of as an A hole for saying something to a neighbor, rather than remaining silent and seeing them potentially get hurt.

Here is another inportant consideration when you consider tackling your roofing job yourself. If the roof is really gone, your ass is literally on the line when you get up there and begin walking on the roof and kkchuc---krrack, you go through the roof feet first just like Saddam Hussein going through the trapdoor on the gallows.
Another thing is if you are gonna hang Christmas lights, or install a satellite dish, or a tv antenna on the roof, or repair a chimney cap, or even just cleaning your gutters, --MAKE CERTAIN YOU HAVE A QUALITY LADDER and Ladder Brace, and have it securely anchored, and an able qualified assistant to help secure the Ladder and to call 911 immediately if something does go wrong. It is also worth mentioning that your aerial POWER LINE FEED to the HOME (unless you have underground...) is something you must pay attention to-------MANY FOLKS DON'T AND GET ELECTROCUTED When Conductive Metal ladders, and antenna masts, etc....slip or shift and touch the power line while you are holding/touching the conductive metal item that is now touching the power line connection point.
********************* IF YOU SEE ONE OF YOUR NEIGHBORS, or one of their teen-age kids, WORKING ON THEIR HOUSE or CAR (or welding or using other power tools) IN A DANGEROUS UNSAFE MANNER, THEN SPEAK-UP AND TELL THEM WHY THEIR PROCEEDURE IS DANGEROUS AND SUGGEST A SAFER PROCEEDURE & SHOW THEM. I doubt that they will think you're an A HOLE for doing so, not for that, anyway....
Also, remember that Neighbors sometimes like to borrow tools, I am certainly okay with loaning tools even if they are mistreated or damaged. They are just tools. It is no big deal. What is a big deal is knowing whether your neighbor has the knowledge and skill to operate certain power tools BEFORE YOU LEFT THEM USE THEM because Jack next door might have never used that type of power tool before and you know Jack is fearless and has no time to bother with even a how to on youtube. Jack might get really hurt, so you have to sort of consider who will be using what type of tool.
Remember too, to not encourage someone that you know is physically incapable or mentally incapable of doing some DIY task. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

Be careful out there. Unless you live in CANADA, things can get really really pricey if serious boo-boos do occur even if you have the best health insurance plan around. You are still gonna have substantial out-of-pocket costs. If you're in a crummy HMO, you might not be allowed the quality Physical Therapy or the best Orthopaedic Surgeons. BE CAREFUL OUT THERE.
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Old 08-25-21, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
I make it a point to speak with neighbors who are attempting something risky themselves. I know that perhaps some might think that I'm an A hole for asking them if they know what the hell that they are doing and pointing out some things that they should consider in both their method(s) and equipment & tools. The way that I look at it is if you know anything that might be helpful and potentially help someone avoid a potential catastrophe, or at least help them proceed with their DIY homerepair, tree cutting or car repair in the safest possible manner.

About ten years ago, after a winter storm brought down a few trees and tree limbs etc. A great guy that was a great tennis player, and avid cyclist and a great father to four young children, decides to take it upon himself to cut the limbs himself that were across his driveway and broken limbs of several pine trees that were about 20 ft in the air above his driveway. What seemed easy to him, killed him. He fell and hit the driveway below and then survived for almost three days. He wasn't a dumbass. He was a dentist with his own practice. He had just turned 41 years old. He didn't want to wait as there was no reason as their home had power (the entire neighborhood had power). He was impatient I guess because limbs blocked his driveway, but hell they could still exit their garage and then drive across the lawn to the street if they needed to go anywhere. Nobody was going anywhere as in the South if you get five inches of snow, its a three day party of doing nothing, as everything shuts down for a day if there is 3/4 of an inch of snow. He obviously felt that doing the limb cutting was super-simple and it possibly might have been, under normal dry conditions. It is a wonder that none of his neighbors or his wife, said Ted, just wait, as this doesn't need to be done today under these conditions. His condition was grave with little chance of survival as his skull was fractured badly among other injuries but he survived nearly three days. I can only guess what the hospital bills were but who really cares about that if the outcome results in survival with near full mobility and excellent quality of life. Sadly, in many cases, there is no way to put Humpty Dumpty back together again and young athletic, fit folks die from multiple severe injuries incurred in a fall.

I always stop when I see someone doing work on their car supported by concrete cinder blocks. I don't care if it is in another city in the worst part of town or near the airport and I'm almost late to catch the flight. Many times, nobody has told them the hazards and they don't know that cinder blocks can crumble and crack and the person under the car gets crushed when the car drops on their chest.
Hey, if you were once the dumbass, who learned through the school of hard knocks or whatever, you should try to share your knowledge with those that may be doing their work in a very risky or unsafe manner. Recently, I convinced a neighbor that wanted to paint his home while on ladders, to use sturdy interconnected scaffolding instead. He didn't want the unsightly scaffolding. I told Walter that nobody is gonna care if the scaffolding is up for two weeks or even three. Nobody wants to see you fall from a ladder. Do it safely, and just rent the scaffolding, and if you need any help, Preston, Will and I will be glad to help you get it set up. Hell, you can use my truck anytime that you need to pickup stuff from Lowes/Home Depot or Building Supply place etc........just let me know because sometimes you know we keep the truck at our lake house. Try to be a good neighbor and not a jerk. I'd rather be thought of as an A hole for saying something to a neighbor, rather than remaining silent and seeing them potentially get hurt.

Here is another inportant consideration when you consider tackling your roofing job yourself. If the roof is really gone, your ass is literally on the line when you get up there and begin walking on the roof and kkchuc---krrack, you go through the roof feet first just like Saddam Hussein going through the trapdoor on the gallows.
Another thing is if you are gonna hang Christmas lights, or install a satellite dish, or a tv antenna on the roof, or repair a chimney cap, or even just cleaning your gutters, --MAKE CERTAIN YOU HAVE A QUALITY LADDER and Ladder Brace, and have it securely anchored, and an able qualified assistant to help secure the Ladder and to call 911 immediately if something does go wrong. It is also worth mentioning that your aerial POWER LINE FEED to the HOME (unless you have underground...) is something you must pay attention to-------MANY FOLKS DON'T AND GET ELECTROCUTED When Conductive Metal ladders, and antenna masts, etc....slip or shift and touch the power line while you are holding/touching the conductive metal item that is now touching the power line connection point.
********************* IF YOU SEE ONE OF YOUR NEIGHBORS, or one of their teen-age kids, WORKING ON THEIR HOUSE or CAR (or welding or using other power tools) IN A DANGEROUS UNSAFE MANNER, THEN SPEAK-UP AND TELL THEM WHY THEIR PROCEEDURE IS DANGEROUS AND SUGGEST A SAFER PROCEEDURE & SHOW THEM. I doubt that they will think you're an A HOLE for doing so, not for that, anyway....
Also, remember that Neighbors sometimes like to borrow tools, I am certainly okay with loaning tools even if they are mistreated or damaged. They are just tools. It is no big deal. What is a big deal is knowing whether your neighbor has the knowledge and skill to operate certain power tools BEFORE YOU LEFT THEM USE THEM because Jack next door might have never used that type of power tool before and you know Jack is fearless and has no time to bother with even a how to on youtube. Jack might get really hurt, so you have to sort of consider who will be using what type of tool.
Remember too, to not encourage someone that you know is physically incapable or mentally incapable of doing some DIY task. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

Be careful out there. Unless you live in CANADA, things can get really really pricey if serious boo-boos do occur even if you have the best health insurance plan around. You are still gonna have substantial out-of-pocket costs. If you're in a crummy HMO, you might not be allowed the quality Physical Therapy or the best Orthopaedic Surgeons. BE CAREFUL OUT THERE.
Yup, I agree! I read the whole essay took forever seriously you make valid points. Let the professionals do the professional things that is why they are professionals. And you are not!
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Old 08-25-21, 11:33 PM
  #10  
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Patching roofs a few times persuaded me I wasn't cut out to re-roof an entire house.
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Old 08-26-21, 07:21 AM
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The roofer I knew said he never fell off. He jumped a few times. He probably died of smoking.
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Old 08-26-21, 07:32 AM
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When I found out how little it cost to put a roof on my slightly bigger than a bread box house, it was way cheaper than many ER visits, a definite no brainer.
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Old 08-26-21, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Patching roofs a few times persuaded me I wasn't cut out to re-roof an entire house.
In my youth, I still remember the time when I had a rope tied to my waist, and the other end tied to the center chimney on a three story Victorian, but that was when I was ten feet tall and bullet proof. It gives me chills to think about it today.
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Old 08-26-21, 07:53 AM
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About ten years ago, the wife unit and I re-shingled our entire roof by ourselves. It was a horrorshow.

Nobody helped us. Oh, wait, my brother came by with a lawn chair and plopped-down his 450+ lb arse in the shade and started telling me what to do.

The shingles were so old and rotten, they came off in pieces. There were shingles that had holes in them, and you could see right through to bare wood. The house was 30 years old by then, and the shingles - which were probably the cheapest ones they could get - were shot. There was also no roofing felt or any sort of underlayment, so we naturally added that. We scraped the roof clean and started fresh.

It was September, which usually brings about some cooler temps, but its was almost unbearably hot. We suffered and sweated and sunburned our way to a good roof. My wife was a trooper, though. I did have to put her in the truck and take her back to Stepford for a reboot, but I dont think that was heat-related. I'm guessing she jarred something loose when she fell off the roof six times.
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Old 08-26-21, 02:40 PM
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Yup going to hire the same crew to replace the trim with metal casing. One and done for life.. I collecting aluminum cans to raise funds.
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Old 08-26-21, 03:53 PM
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About cars on cinder blocks, a friend of mine lost her dad when the car he was working on shifted and crushed him to death.
This was in college, like twenty five years ago, and to this day I wish I or someone, anyone, had been there to advise him otherwise.
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Old 08-26-21, 06:56 PM
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That has happened around here too often with farm machinery.
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Old 08-27-21, 07:31 PM
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30+ years ago when I bought the house my buddies and I did a tear off and reroof (28 square but 4:12 pitch ranch). A couple years ago it was ready again. We're all 30 years older, screw that. Worked a ton of OT and wrote a check for that one. Poured my 80 X 20 concrete driveway with 20 X 28 side slab with buddies. Looking at a new 20 X 20 patio, Yeah, I'll write a check. Just had my 16' garage door replaced. $1100 to buy a door or $1300 installed. Would have taken me & son a full day plus disposal. Sat in a lawn chair and watched the guy install it in a few hours.
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Old 08-27-21, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Rage View Post
About cars on cinder blocks, a friend of mine lost her dad when the car he was working on shifted and crushed him to death.
This was in college, like twenty five years ago, and to this day I wish I or someone, anyone, had been there to advise him otherwise.
I always collected solid concrete and boards for that and was extra meticulous about the setup. If I set it up for changing out a GM 350 turbo transmission or anything like that it was safer than any carjack setup. And probably safer than ramps depending on how those are setup . . . The setup is everything.

Cinderblocks are NOT an option. Being in a hurry with your setup is not an option.
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Old 08-27-21, 08:38 PM
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I just got through doing the front of my place with 3 tab shingles. I did the rear part in 2015. I have a pretty steep pitch and scoot around on my butt up there a lot, using a piece of foam when it's hot . . . so I'm obviously no roofer.. . . but I'm YouTube educated.

I think I had around 1200 square ft on the front and spent about $1400 for materials including the old fashioned cheaper paper rather than felt and nails which I bought too many of'.

I had help from a roofer who had mostly done the teardowns and a guy who rents some of my property for storage. He borrowed a nail gun and we used his little portable pot compressor which we took on the roof. I paid those guys $500 or the equivalent of in rental. I paid another guy $300 for bucking shingles up to the roof. The monkey see monkey do roofing team.

We put 4 nails per shingle just above the tar line which effectively put 4 more through the top of the shingle as you nail the next row. That should be in compliance with any area's codes.

We all three did some nailing and I had to rework part of 2 rows. My roof is a pretty simple one with only a porch overhang at the front. the job is proper and looks good. A roofer might criticize our line on every little slit not lining up within a damned quarter inch on every other row but a roofer would be the only one that noticed. They are aligned so that it doesn't leak. My free inspector was my helper's boss who is a roofing contractor. And I didn't have to bribe him to pass our job. My helper gets to nail at his work now.

That's about $3000 and too much work. At 70 years old I don't believe I'll be making a career out of it. Relieved to have gotten it done.
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Old 08-27-21, 09:10 PM
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Roofing was a family business so I've done enough of them and will do another if I need to. My grandfather started the business, my dad and uncles worked it till my dad moved upstate. When we needed extra money and I was old enough we would roof, till one day I stepped on a piece of tar paper a helper didn't tack down and took a trip for the edge 3 stories up, managed to roll off the sheet with my feet dangling over the edge. Finished that job and a cottage and left for college, decided I wasn't cut out for being a full time roofer any more. Dad quit at the same time as his military injury finally put his back out of commission when it came to heavy lifting. Still ended up doing a roofing job every summer for the next 15 years for relatives or friends who needed the work done. Last job was my own barn, the year after I moved in a winter storm peeled off half of it, the roofer who had done the work a few years prior had used defective shingles which was obvious from looking at them, and was cheap with the nails. Insurance gave 15k for the job so I had the local hardware store do a roof top delivery, got out the harness and braces/scaffolding and went to work. The roof was steep enough that if you set a shingle down anywhere other than bent over the roof line it would ride for the ground so not a safe surface. Learned I was getting old when I tried to shoulder a left over bundle of shingles and discovered that while I could get them on my shoulder I wasn't strong enough to keep them from trowing me completely off balance. Ended up letting them drop 45' rather than risk falling; ladder was tied and I was harnessed but still didn't want to test the system. Only took 2 days to do a 60'x35' so I'm still not too slow.
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Old 08-27-21, 09:45 PM
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Yup, I’m confident in the roofers that did the repair job. No BS all work job done well. They earned the next job on my house.
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Old 08-27-21, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
I make it a point to speak with neighbors who are attempting something risky themselves. I know that perhaps some might think that I'm an A hole for asking them if they know what the hell that they are doing and pointing out some things that they should consider in both their method(s) and equipment & tools. The way that I look at it is if you know anything that might be helpful and potentially help someone avoid a potential catastrophe, or at least help them proceed with their DIY homerepair, tree cutting or car repair in the safest possible manner.

About ten years ago, after a winter storm brought down a few trees and tree limbs etc. A great guy that was a great tennis player, and avid cyclist and a great father to four young children, decides to take it upon himself to cut the limbs himself that were across his driveway and broken limbs of several pine trees that were about 20 ft in the air above his driveway. What seemed easy to him, killed him. He fell and hit the driveway below and then survived for almost three days. He wasn't a dumbass. He was a dentist with his own practice. He had just turned 41 years old. He didn't want to wait as there was no reason as their home had power (the entire neighborhood had power). He was impatient I guess because limbs blocked his driveway, but hell they could still exit their garage and then drive across the lawn to the street if they needed to go anywhere. Nobody was going anywhere as in the South if you get five inches of snow, its a three day party of doing nothing, as everything shuts down for a day if there is 3/4 of an inch of snow. He obviously felt that doing the limb cutting was super-simple and it possibly might have been, under normal dry conditions. It is a wonder that none of his neighbors or his wife, said Ted, just wait, as this doesn't need to be done today under these conditions. His condition was grave with little chance of survival as his skull was fractured badly among other injuries but he survived nearly three days. I can only guess what the hospital bills were but who really cares about that if the outcome results in survival with near full mobility and excellent quality of life. Sadly, in many cases, there is no way to put Humpty Dumpty back together again and young athletic, fit folks die from multiple severe injuries incurred in a fall.

I always stop when I see someone doing work on their car supported by concrete cinder blocks. I don't care if it is in another city in the worst part of town or near the airport and I'm almost late to catch the flight. Many times, nobody has told them the hazards and they don't know that cinder blocks can crumble and crack and the person under the car gets crushed when the car drops on their chest.
Hey, if you were once the dumbass, who learned through the school of hard knocks or whatever, you should try to share your knowledge with those that may be doing their work in a very risky or unsafe manner. Recently, I convinced a neighbor that wanted to paint his home while on ladders, to use sturdy interconnected scaffolding instead. He didn't want the unsightly scaffolding. I told Walter that nobody is gonna care if the scaffolding is up for two weeks or even three. Nobody wants to see you fall from a ladder. Do it safely, and just rent the scaffolding, and if you need any help, Preston, Will and I will be glad to help you get it set up. Hell, you can use my truck anytime that you need to pickup stuff from Lowes/Home Depot or Building Supply place etc........just let me know because sometimes you know we keep the truck at our lake house. Try to be a good neighbor and not a jerk. I'd rather be thought of as an A hole for saying something to a neighbor, rather than remaining silent and seeing them potentially get hurt.

Here is another inportant consideration when you consider tackling your roofing job yourself. If the roof is really gone, your ass is literally on the line when you get up there and begin walking on the roof and kkchuc---krrack, you go through the roof feet first just like Saddam Hussein going through the trapdoor on the gallows.
Another thing is if you are gonna hang Christmas lights, or install a satellite dish, or a tv antenna on the roof, or repair a chimney cap, or even just cleaning your gutters, --MAKE CERTAIN YOU HAVE A QUALITY LADDER and Ladder Brace, and have it securely anchored, and an able qualified assistant to help secure the Ladder and to call 911 immediately if something does go wrong. It is also worth mentioning that your aerial POWER LINE FEED to the HOME (unless you have underground...) is something you must pay attention to-------MANY FOLKS DON'T AND GET ELECTROCUTED When Conductive Metal ladders, and antenna masts, etc....slip or shift and touch the power line while you are holding/touching the conductive metal item that is now touching the power line connection point.
********************* IF YOU SEE ONE OF YOUR NEIGHBORS, or one of their teen-age kids, WORKING ON THEIR HOUSE or CAR (or welding or using other power tools) IN A DANGEROUS UNSAFE MANNER, THEN SPEAK-UP AND TELL THEM WHY THEIR PROCEEDURE IS DANGEROUS AND SUGGEST A SAFER PROCEEDURE & SHOW THEM. I doubt that they will think you're an A HOLE for doing so, not for that, anyway....
Also, remember that Neighbors sometimes like to borrow tools, I am certainly okay with loaning tools even if they are mistreated or damaged. They are just tools. It is no big deal. What is a big deal is knowing whether your neighbor has the knowledge and skill to operate certain power tools BEFORE YOU LEFT THEM USE THEM because Jack next door might have never used that type of power tool before and you know Jack is fearless and has no time to bother with even a how to on youtube. Jack might get really hurt, so you have to sort of consider who will be using what type of tool.
Remember too, to not encourage someone that you know is physically incapable or mentally incapable of doing some DIY task. That is a disaster waiting to happen.

Be careful out there. Unless you live in CANADA, things can get really really pricey if serious boo-boos do occur even if you have the best health insurance plan around. You are still gonna have substantial out-of-pocket costs. If you're in a crummy HMO, you might not be allowed the quality Physical Therapy or the best Orthopaedic Surgeons. BE CAREFUL OUT THERE.
Man Oh man . . . Tree arboring is about the most dangerous thing you can take it upon yourself to do if you don't know what the hell you are doing. Watch the YouTube tree arboring fails if you are thinking of saving money that way. That should cure you of that notion.

You can always tell when somebody is not an arborist if he's trying to take down a tree in a difficult tight spot without limbing it first . . . and there's a good chance that tree won't be going in the direction you intend it to go when you don't know, by much experience, what the hell you are doing. Those are the funny tree arboring fail videos because they only cost money in damages . . . usually. Lots and lots of money.

And painting your house often means you won't have to scrape as much so you can use a pole extension and stay off the ladder. I used to be a commercial painter, shipyard burner, shipfitter and welder that worked out of sky-climber cages a lot in all those jobs. But I always used a safety-rope setup. I might've shimmied down a safety rope or two when the compressor died, giving my boss a little rise in his blood pressure, but otherwise I take no chances up there. Ladders scare the hell out of me and I either screw them down to the side of a roof or find a way to stay off of them.

I'm dangerous just for missing the bottom step because I'd thought i was standing on it when I wasn't. That puts me on my butt so I probably don't need to be much higher than that on any unsecured ladder.

I don't loan tools anymore . . . period.

Last edited by Zinger; 08-27-21 at 09:55 PM.
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Old 08-27-21, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
That has happened around here too often with farm machinery.
Lots of deaths on farm machinery. Falling asleep and falling off into the path of a disk plow is a hard way to check out.
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Old 08-27-21, 10:20 PM
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Yup, I am lucky to escape major injuries when my family had a large ranch. I guess I was the only one that loved hard labor lol. Went to a university and not online but chose to work the land. No regrets the land gave back to me what I put into it Weird how things like that work out. But yes farm and ranch work is dangerous and precautions should be in place especially when fatigue and tiredness sets in.
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