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possible to coat with teflon?

Old 01-18-06, 03:54 PM
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phantomcow2
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possible to coat with teflon?

I am thinking about making my own linear bushing system of some type. I was thinking using 1" drill rod and have delrin bushings bored .001" larger. I've tried this with some plain old steel rod and with silicone as a lubricant, its surprisingly smooth. I have this teflon coated threaded rod with delrin nuts i made, and its almost as smooth as a ballscrew. So im wondering...

Is it possible to coat drill rod with teflon, or something of the like?
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Old 01-18-06, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by phantomcow2
Is it possible to coat drill rod with teflon, or something of the like?
Yes.

For one piece, it won't be cheap.

Teflon is the brand name of the DuPont polymer. They control about 85% of the business.

The generic name for this material is Polytetrafluoroethylene. PTFE for short.

Try these guys. They are relatively close to you.

http://www.precisioncoating.com/

Since you're a HS student doing a special project, they may do it for free. It doesn't cost to ask.

Be sure to ask the thickness of the coating. You may have to open up your bearings a bit to account for it.

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Old 01-18-06, 04:20 PM
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eeh im not going to bother if i have to get somebody to do it. I would go with linear bearings and tool steel drill rod if SDP-SI actually gave their damn prices! I look at the 5/8 Open bearings, and it justs "in stock"
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Old 01-18-06, 06:06 PM
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You can get teflon lubricant in a spray can (maybe even small tubes) if you want to try that instead of coating one piece.
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Old 01-18-06, 07:06 PM
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Yea i know, thats available. Tri-flow might do it. I would rather have teflon coated rods, but now my idea is just to have drill rod and make bushings out of teflon.
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Old 01-18-06, 07:53 PM
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I believe the Teflon coating process involves nuclear bombardment of some sorts. I don't think you'll want to get the necessary paperwork and vessel just to do a couple of pieces in your basement.
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Old 01-18-06, 08:07 PM
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Such is why, i can always buy teflon stock from McMaster or Metalmart. It will be something like 18 bucks for what i need. I doubt i will go with this idea though, im looking for some fast speeds and rigidity
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Old 01-18-06, 09:10 PM
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PTFE is amazingly easy to drill and cut, compared to most other plastics.
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Old 01-18-06, 09:46 PM
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Eh...

Try oilite for oil impregnated metal. Or use aluminium oxide for precision.
If you're buying from mickycarr, make sure you get hydrated teflon. Both nylon and teflon don't hold tolerances too well with humidity.
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Old 01-18-06, 10:14 PM
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hmmm, and impoderable from the book,Why Do Clocks Run Clockwise?

If nothing sticks to teflon, what makes it stick to the pan?
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Old 01-18-06, 11:17 PM
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I'm assuming they either a) use a primer on it like some paint or wax coatings, b) sand down the surface and plasma deposit it onto the surface nice and thick so it mechanically locks onto the pan but the top layer remains flat and smooth or c) bake it on (which might explain why overheating a teflon pan can cause it to go bad).
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Old 01-19-06, 04:33 AM
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Have you tried plain old nylon? Its the KIS principle (keep it simple).

Regards, Anthony
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Old 01-19-06, 05:20 AM
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I was going to buy from MetalMart but maybe McMaster. I wont be doing this anyways, just going to pass the idea on to my teacher now.
I think rolling is the way to go....

And one possible solution is the Igus bearing:
http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...PMT4NO=4051026

But what fun is that?
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Old 01-19-06, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by scarpi41
hmmm, and impoderable from the book,Why Do Clocks Run Clockwise?

If nothing sticks to teflon, what makes it stick to the pan?
Irradiation.
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Old 01-19-06, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by catatonic
PTFE is amazingly easy to drill and cut, compared to most other plastics.
Yes, but you may want to change the relief angle on your cutting tools. Tools designed for metal cutting have a relief angle of about 8º, while for PTFE (and plastics in general) it should be around 22º.

Another neat thing is you don't need coolant! We just shoot cold air at the parts when we machine them.

We routinely hold tolerances of + .001 (yep, that's 1/1000 inch) on some of our PTFE parts.
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Old 01-19-06, 03:26 PM
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Ive never machined PTFE, but i do delrin frequently. Its a lot of fun, and surprisingly not as easy as one may think. It just wears so well, its my first choice for nuts.
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