Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Camping: Aluminum or Stainless Steel mess kit?

Notices
Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Camping: Aluminum or Stainless Steel mess kit?

Old 05-04-10, 08:43 AM
  #1  
Zero_Enigma
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Zero_Enigma's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North of the 49th Parallel (GPS grid soon)
Posts: 1,766

Bikes: MTB Peugoet Canyon (forgot the model), Nikishi? roadbike, MTB custom build,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Camping: Aluminum or Stainless Steel mess kit?

So I found out that Can.T has on sale thier mess kits. I've been wanting for years to get a mess kit but this year I'm aiming for a personal short or light touring on bicycle.

I need help from those more experienced in backpacking/camping or bicycle touring. I'm looking for a cheap camping set and I may be touring with another person but consider it a solo touring for now.

https://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows...ccessories.jsp

I need to know which is better aluminum or stainless steel? The pro/cons? Health benefits? Any food reactions? etc etc etc!!?

Thank you kindly.

That sale is on till Thursday (or if you call your local Can.T to hold it for you if you can't make it some may honor you the price on Friday).
Zero_Enigma is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 08:43 AM
  #2  
Zero_Enigma
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Zero_Enigma's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North of the 49th Parallel (GPS grid soon)
Posts: 1,766

Bikes: MTB Peugoet Canyon (forgot the model), Nikishi? roadbike, MTB custom build,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I may cancel carrying a stove and use avaliable wood so I am curious how the frying pans can hold up to the heat? Now I know if I had an adjustable heat stove then those fancy non stick pans would make cleaning and life easier but on open fires you don't know the heat temp and could easily go over the ~210C range unless you happen to carry a temp gun with you for some reason.

It has been many many moons since I did camping in scouts. I can't remember fully what was used for cooking gear. I do remember one time time clearly cooking on a coleman dual burner stove while some guy was handcuffed to an axe and shoved into the CYBO locked up in there. WTFF he got handcuffed to the axe I have no frigging idea. IIRC that was one of my first camping trips in scouts. Also no idea why the guy was locked in the CYBO. I think it was something to do with using excessive profanity as I fainty remmeber someone having soap in their mouth.

Annnnnywaaays what's the call on this?


Aluminum set $9.74 / Reg. $12.99

https://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en

and

Stainless set. $26.24 / Reg. $34.99

https://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en

and

Enamel set $26.24 / Reg. $34.99

https://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en


Keep in mind I plan on putting this into my AWOL bag later. How does enamel hold up to cleaning and use and weight?
Zero_Enigma is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 08:55 AM
  #3  
ModoVincere
Riding Heaven's Highways on the grand tour
 
ModoVincere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,675
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I find that the aluminum cooks quicker and is lighter. Some worry about aluminum effecting their food. Stainless steel is a good way to go if that is a concern of yours.
__________________
1 bronze, 0 silver, 1 gold
ModoVincere is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 08:58 AM
  #4  
overthehillmedi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Nanaimo.B.C. The We't coast of Canada
Posts: 1,287
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
carbon fiber or titanium, get with the new age. (somebody had to say it) seriously check out MEC on-line https://www.mec.ca/Main/home.jsp?bmFo...13&search.y=14
overthehillmedi is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 09:42 AM
  #5  
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Posts: 8,728
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 26 Posts
CF? Really?
HardyWeinberg is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 10:05 AM
  #6  
Mr IGH
afraid of whales
 
Mr IGH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Front Range, CO
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Some people claim aluminum is bad for you but I can't remember why....
Mr IGH is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 10:12 AM
  #7  
Snicklefritz
Senior Member
 
Snicklefritz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: In the middle of horse country, in The Garden State
Posts: 3,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
^^^^Something about ingesting aluminum and its likelihood of leading to Alzheimer's
Snicklefritz is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 10:16 AM
  #8  
Shifty
Sore saddle cyclist
 
Shifty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 3,880

Bikes: Road, touring and mountain

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Go with a good brand aluminium set, but make sure it is hard anodized. A good no stick surface coating is also very helpful. I would normally recommend titanium, but it's pretty expensive.
Shifty is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 11:49 AM
  #9  
*Scuba 
Made in Taiwan
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 193

Bikes: Camerotti ti roadbike, Old Sears Free Spirit Tange Hi-Ten Single Speed built from a 12 speed, 1997 Cannondale CAD3 r500 with Shimano 6400 groupset

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Depending on where you are planning on touring, I would really consider getting a multifuel stove. A lot of places in North America as the weather warms up will have open flame restrictions due to the risk of forest fires. This is even at designated campsites. Do your homework and research before hand about the areas that you are planning on touring.

A multifuel stove is useful in that you can use a lot of different types of fuel and can get them almost anywhere.

Personally I would go with stainless. Just what I like to use.
__________________
All dogs want to be lap dogs doesn't matter the size
-Animal loving friend
*Scuba is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 01:27 PM
  #10  
a1rabbit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Pop Can stove, or the like. Very light. Read about the fuels you can and can't use. You can get fuels anywhere but don't use petroleum products, such as gas, bad things happen.

Pot - Heineken 24oz beer keg can, cut the top off with a safety can opener. Use the top as a lid and the bottom as the pot. They are coated with something inside to keep the beer fresh so general speculation is it's safe if you don't overheat the pot and burn the stuff off the bottom/sides. People have been doing that for years. I think I've seen people wrap the pot with with fiberglass drywall tape if they don't have the fiberglass wick that you'll see in some links I'll post later. The wick/tape is used basically as a permanent pot glove so you can pick it up with boiled water in it without burning yourself.

If you want titanium get something like the Snow Peak 700. More expensive but a nice buy.

For containers, get a 4 cup zip lock twist n lock container (has a screw on lid) and a 1 or 2 cup ziplock twist n lock container. (I think it's the 1 cup)

Take one of the lids and cut the center out of it with a sharp knife, or lathe if you have one kicking around. This turns the lid into a ring. Put the 1 cup container through the ring and screw the ring to the 4 cup container. Your pot, stove, fork, windscreen, lighter, fuel and misc parts will all fit inside your newly made container. When you're cooking / eating you can use the 4 cup and 1 cup containers to mix your food in and eat out of. Here is a video of Tinny from MiniBull Designs making one so you can see what I mean. Take a look around his product page, might give you some ideas on things to make yourself.

His stoves are so cheap, light and quaility workmanship that if you can't make your own it's not a big deal to buy one for 12 bucks. I've never bought one of his products because I enjoy making things myself, but I am tempted to order his bios #4 out of curiosity, as well as the Atomic / mini Atomic.

Some stoves are better suited to small diameter pots, such as the beer can pot. The wick type stoves tend to work better, or ones that jet inwards.

Where as a regular pop can stove may work better with a wider pot bottom since they are jetted out the side, usually. But it will still work, though it might be slower.

If you don't want anything like that then I'd suggest looking around for a grease pot. Here is a link to what it is. Again, people have used these for years and love them! From 6-10 dollars. Good price.

Regardless of what you choose you may not want to eat out of a pot or a thin dish. If this is the case then look for the rectangular zip-lock dishes with lids. They are soft, light and easy to pack with gear you want to keep dry when you're not eating. Cheap too.

Last edited by a1rabbit; 05-04-10 at 01:32 PM.
a1rabbit is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 01:27 PM
  #11  
rlrct
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 121

Bikes: Trek XO1 (Commuter), Trek Madone 6.5, older Trek 850 hardtail MTB, crashed Kestrel 200SCi I can't toss

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I was a kid, the cooking stuff was all aluminum. If cooking on a wood fire, the outsides seem to get blacker than stainless steel would. Stainless will be a bit heavier. You should note that the pots/pans in the stainless set you linked to are a bit larger than the aluminum ones. That extra size could make cooking easier.
rlrct is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 03:20 PM
  #12  
coasting 
Still can't climb
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Limey in Taiwan
Posts: 23,024
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
CF will explode
__________________
coasting, few quotes are worthy of him, and of those, even fewer printable in a family forum......quote 3alarmer

No @coasting, you should stay 100% as you are right now, don't change a thing....quote Heathpack
coasting is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 04:34 PM
  #13  
gnome
shaken, not stirred.
 
gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: The Shaky Isles.
Posts: 4,844

Bikes: I've lost count.

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Liked 348 Times in 151 Posts
I'd go for hard-anodised aluminium or titanium if you are feeling rich. I haven't tried my ti pot yet so I can't confirm that it will actually cook as well as an aluminium pot. Stainless steel is nice to cook with but is heavier.
__________________
Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain, "Taming the Bicycle"
vBulletin: snafu
gnome is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 05:36 PM
  #14  
apclassic9
Caustic Soccer Mom
 
apclassic9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Millstone WV
Posts: 1,761
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
if you're going to go with AL, make sure you get the kind that has been enameled (that blue-dotted stuff) - otherwise, go stainless. AL will rot your brain, AND it looks gross after a few uses. Stainless cleans better - the blue enamel stuff cleans up nice, and you can get an entire kit (pot/pan/plate/utensil) that fits into a handy pack. TI can get brittle & shatter.
__________________
As with mud, life, too, slides by.
apclassic9 is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 06:02 PM
  #15  
ilikebikes
K2ProFlex baby!
 
ilikebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: My response would have been something along the lines of: "Does your bike have computer controlled suspension? Then shut your piehole, this baby is from the future!"
Posts: 6,124

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 25 Posts
Stainless Steel, it may be a tad bit heavier but it'll last a lifetime.
__________________
You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve
ilikebikes is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 07:14 PM
  #16  
MTBLover
But on the road more
 
MTBLover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 864

Bikes: Bianchi Volpe '07

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd go with stainless too. All cookware scratches with use, but aluminum really scratches more easily and those scratches hold food residue- therefore harder to clean. IMO, it's worth the extra weight (which isn't much) to go stainless.
MTBLover is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 07:22 PM
  #17  
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Posts: 11,736
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Titanium has horrible thermal-conductivity and doesn't work well for cookware. Flatware, cups and plates are fine.

Stainless is easier to clean and stays scratch-free, especially if you're using metal cooking tools.

Aluminium is lighter, has great thermal-conductivity for even heating. But the black soot marks on the outside is really, really hard to remove. Even anodized aluminium isn't as tough as stainless.
DannoXYZ is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 07:43 PM
  #18  
coffeecake
Blocking your fire exits
 
coffeecake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd go with stainless, but it doesn't really matter - it's from Canadian Tire, so I doubt it would last the summer.
(Disclosure: 3 of my siblings work there.)
coffeecake is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 08:58 PM
  #19  
ilikebikes
K2ProFlex baby!
 
ilikebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: My response would have been something along the lines of: "Does your bike have computer controlled suspension? Then shut your piehole, this baby is from the future!"
Posts: 6,124

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by coffeecake View Post
I'd go with stainless, but it doesn't really matter - it's from Canadian Tire, so I doubt it would last the summer. (Disclosure: 3 of my siblings work there.)
high grade stainless is going to last forever.
__________________
You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve
ilikebikes is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 09:24 PM
  #20  
coffeecake
Blocking your fire exits
 
coffeecake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
At $27 for the entire set, I highly doubt this is "high-grade" 18/10 stainless.
coffeecake is offline  
Old 05-04-10, 09:42 PM
  #21  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,173

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 588 Post(s)
Liked 410 Times in 257 Posts
Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
Titanium has horrible thermal-conductivity and doesn't work well for cookware. Flatware, cups and plates are fine.

Stainless is easier to clean and stays scratch-free, especially if you're using metal cooking tools.

Aluminium is lighter, has great thermal-conductivity for even heating. But the black soot marks on the outside is really, really hard to remove. Even anodized aluminium isn't as tough as stainless.
In the context of the OP's question: Ti is king, and soot marks are preferred.

But Danno brings up a good point about cooking with Ti: It's easy to scorch food. So depending on what you cook and how well you can control the heat from your stove (or fire) would dictate what material is best. I have seen cheap AL pots melt in a hot fire, but I can cook just about anything in my old non-stick AL potset (similar to this one from MSR). I also have a stainless steel set that's fine for boil-only cooking.

I have been eying up a Ti pot for backpacking...

Last edited by StupidlyBrave; 05-04-10 at 09:48 PM. Reason: link added
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Old 05-05-10, 01:56 AM
  #22  
gnome
shaken, not stirred.
 
gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: The Shaky Isles.
Posts: 4,844

Bikes: I've lost count.

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Liked 348 Times in 151 Posts
Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
In the context of the OP's question: Ti is king, and soot marks are preferred.

But Danno brings up a good point about cooking with Ti: It's easy to scorch food. So depending on what you cook and how well you can control the heat from your stove (or fire) would dictate what material is best. I have seen cheap AL pots melt in a hot fire, but I can cook just about anything in my old non-stick AL potset (similar to this one from MSR). I also have a stainless steel set that's fine for boil-only cooking.

I have been eying up a Ti pot for backpacking...
I must admit that I've been using the old non-nonstick aluminium potset from my Trangia cooker.

I've just got a Vargo ti 1.3l billy now.

I've also lightened my cookset by buying a Evernew ti alcohol stove and a light pot stand as well.

I haven't tried the pot yet, but the I've, at least, halved the weight of my cookset.

I think I will end up with an hard anodised aluminium pot for cooking lentils, currys or things that I want to simmer and the ti pot for boiling water for the rice/pasta/couscous.

If you want to fry things it is better to have a slightly heavier and bigger frypan though.
__________________
Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain, "Taming the Bicycle"
vBulletin: snafu
gnome is offline  
Old 05-05-10, 06:55 AM
  #23  
skijor
on by
 
skijor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 950

Bikes: Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 846 Post(s)
Liked 476 Times in 296 Posts
Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
In the context of the OP's question: Ti is king, and soot marks are preferred.

But Danno brings up a good point about cooking with Ti: It's easy to scorch food. So depending on what you cook and how well you can control the heat from your stove (or fire) would dictate what material is best. I have seen cheap AL pots melt in a hot fire, but I can cook just about anything in my old non-stick AL potset (similar to this one from MSR). I also have a stainless steel set that's fine for boil-only cooking.
I have that set. It's non-stick is also non-durable...unlike other MSR products. But it does cook and clean up well. It also packs down nicely. When I get a new set, it'll be stainless.
skijor is offline  
Old 05-05-10, 08:13 AM
  #24  
ilikebikes
K2ProFlex baby!
 
ilikebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: My response would have been something along the lines of: "Does your bike have computer controlled suspension? Then shut your piehole, this baby is from the future!"
Posts: 6,124

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by coffeecake View Post
At $27 for the entire set, I highly doubt this is "high-grade" 18/10 stainless.
I'm sure there are other stores both in the real world and on line that the OP can find a quality stainless steel set.
__________________
You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve
ilikebikes is offline  
Old 05-05-10, 09:03 AM
  #25  
no motor?
Unlisted member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 6,193

Bikes: Specialized Hardrock

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1376 Post(s)
Liked 429 Times in 294 Posts
Put liquid dishwashing detergent on the bottoms of the pans if you cook over an open fire if you want an easy way to cleanup the soot.
no motor? is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.