Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Going to hike Machu Picchu, hikers, lend me your expertise.

Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Going to hike Machu Picchu, hikers, lend me your expertise.

Reply

Old 09-06-11, 09:35 PM
  #1  
Bikernator
Below Par
Thread Starter
 
Bikernator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 196

Bikes: '13 Trek Stache 8; '08 Giant Rincon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Going to hike Machu Picchu, hikers, lend me your expertise.

Two friends of mine and myself are taking a 5-day hike on the Salkantay Trail to Peru's Machu Picchu the first week of January, and I could use some advice. It's almost all gear-related.

We're all in our mid-twenties, athletic, and male. No camping experience to this extent. We will have one guide, and a pack animal that can carry 7kg of our stuff each (about 15 pounds apiece). The guide will provide the tents, food, and water. This will be the rainy season, so everything will need to be waterproof of some sort. Please feel free to mention any brands, styles, models, fabrics/materials etc. of anything mentioned, whether it be condemning or recommending

Boots: Obviously not something we will be slacking on. I don't know if general well-regarded boots (Danner, Rocky, Lacrosse, etc.) have solid reputations in the hiking world, or if that brings in a whole new cast of brands that are preferred? I don't care how 'in' they are, I just want them to be comfortable, reliable, and waterproof. And as for socks, is there a special type that is typically worn for these types of things? Special material, brands, properties, no-nos, etc?

Pants: I hear that the zip-knee type pants are good for this, and it makes sense. Would water-proof be required? I hear there are pants covers that go over your pants for water proofing, but it makes me wonder if I'll get hot (I sweat excessively). Anyone have experience with these things?

Shirts: I'm sort of lost here. Would the 'safari shirts' be the best for this (like the Performance Fishing Gear and similar lines of flapped, ventilated fishing shirts)? Very curious on materials as well.

Underwear: I chafe pretty bad at times, so I'm not too sure what to do here. When I play sports, run, etc. I wear compression shorts which seem to work really well. Is there something I'm missing out on? If it comes to the end of day one and my ass cheeks are raw I'll be in a bad spot. This is actually one of my biggest concerns.

Jacket/Outerwear: Obviously investing in a very good water-proof jacket will be vital. I am thinking of one waterproof jacket then like a hoodie or sweatshirt. Again, I'm worried about sweating if I get an insulated jacket, but don't want to freeze to death if I need something more. Any advice here?

Sleeping Bags: Do you go conservative with the temperature ratings? As in if you'll be camping in 30 degree weather, can you get a 30 degree bag adn be fine or do you dip lower/higher? The weather gets down to around 40 degrees that time of year. I'm all ears for brands with this item as well. Do you really think those pads that go beneath them are worth it? The inflatable ones or the foam?

Toiletries: What all should I bring? Toothbrush, paste, contact solution/change of contacts, Pepto Bismol. Should I bring my own toilet papaer, which brings me to my next question: will I be packing out all my... solids? Oh, and Gold Bond. We'll all be bringing a ton of that, but do any of you prefer the 'medicated' to the regular, or vice versa?

Backpack: Size and brand? Things to look for and not to look for?

Misc.: How many of each thing should I bring? Socks, underwear, pants and shirts, specifically? How often do you typically change? Do you bring thermals for sleeping? I'll also bring sunglasses and a hat of some sort, with sun block. I'm thinking Clif bars, but what else is ideal trail food?

I'm sure I'll come up with some other stuff and questions, but anything helpful you have to offer would really be appreciated. I'm excited for the trip . Thanks again.
Bikernator is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 11:29 PM
  #2  
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Posts: 16,126

Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
good boots, and a good first aid kit, for one. The trail gets a bit rough. Also some tropical rain gear.
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 04:50 AM
  #3  
Jasper Storm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Western Washington
Posts: 525
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Buy some nice trekking poles and get accustomed to using them. They will:

1) Reduce wear and tear on your knees (very important on steep downhills)
2) Allow you to (90% of the time) catch yourself after tripping over a root or rock
3) Help you to climb steep trails/stairs
4) Allow you to hike further despite fatigue due to mileage or altitude
5) Push low hanging branches/vegetation out of the way
Jasper Storm is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 06:27 AM
  #4  
20grit
Curmudgeon in Training
 
20grit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Rural Retreat, VA
Posts: 1,946

Bikes: 1974 Gazelle Champion Mondial, 2010 Cannondale Trail SL, 1988 Peugeot Nice, 1992ish Stumpjumper Comp,1990's Schwinn Moab

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
I have a pair of Asolo boots and really like them. Seldom do I find a boot comfortable right out of the box. These were. The ones I picked up are Gore-Tex and have a pretty beefy Vibram outsole.

I've never hiked with them on, but when I've needed a small rain suit, the products from FroggToggs have been pretty nice. They pack into a small pouch, probably 5.5"x8" or so. Maybe a bit larger.

If you're taking thermals, take silk. They take up less space and are a good product.

As far as sleeping bags... think of them like this. If it says 30 degree bag, that means it will keep you alive at 30 degrees. You won't necessarily be comfortable at 30 degrees.
20grit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 06:38 AM
  #5  
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Posts: 16,126

Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I'd suggest more along the lines of a good poncho rather than a rain suit. It can also double as a sleeping tarp in a pinch and you won't sweat near as much.
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 07:17 AM
  #6  
ModoVincere
Riding Heaven's Highways on the grand tour
 
ModoVincere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,675
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Macchu Picchu is about 8,000 ft asl. That's a pretty good climb/hike. Make sure your equipment is in good shape and the boots are well broken in before you try to hike this.
Also, carry some mole skin. No matter how good your boots are, there's always a chance of blisters...mole skin will help protect any hot spots that develop.

Also, be sure to carry clothing for changing weather conditions. It may be nice and balmy down at the base, but 10-20 or more degrees lower at the top.
Oh, yeah...and have fun too.

As for your questions regarding brands....go to someplace like REI and try out everything before you buy. What works great for me may not work so well for you. Different bodies, different camping styles, etc.
__________________
1 bronze, 0 silver, 1 gold
ModoVincere is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 10:18 AM
  #7  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
I have lots of advice. But first: How much weight do you expect to carry (on this trip as well as "shakedown" trips)? This will determine what backpack suspension and what boots.

What will be the minimum temperature at elevation where you will be? Sleeping bag ratings are rarely accurate.

How much hiking above the treeline?
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 09:02 PM
  #8  
Bikernator
Below Par
Thread Starter
 
Bikernator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 196

Bikes: '13 Trek Stache 8; '08 Giant Rincon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
I forgot to ask about the poles. Good mind-read. Any tips on styles/types?

The FroggTogg things make me nervous due to the sweating thing, but I have heard about them being handy. Anyone else have tips regarding that?

Mole skin. Noted. How about types of socks? As far as clothing for different weather, I was thinking of going with the knee-zip pants, with potential for thermals (silk apparently?), along with a rain jacket and a sweatshirt. I also don't have a local REI, closest one is like 5 hours away.

I'm not sure on the pack weight. It sort of depends on how much stuff I will be bringing, and how much each item weighs, and I'm really not clear on a damn thing. Are there guides and recommendations to go by? As far as weight, I weigh around 200lbs, and I'm usually not a light packer, as I hate to find myself ill-prepared in any situation. That's really not much help, but for the boots you can guarantee no less than 230lbs. The coldest we'll be facing is around 40 F, not sure about the tree line. I can't find any solid info on the max altitude of the trail.

Thanks for all the help.
Bikernator is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-11, 07:36 AM
  #9  
20grit
Curmudgeon in Training
 
20grit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Rural Retreat, VA
Posts: 1,946

Bikes: 1974 Gazelle Champion Mondial, 2010 Cannondale Trail SL, 1988 Peugeot Nice, 1992ish Stumpjumper Comp,1990's Schwinn Moab

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Wool socks. Hands down. You can get various brands marketed to hikers or just go with a decent generic wool sock. You can get sock liners (polypropylene i think? that or silk) that don't take up much space and can be added should your feet start getting cold. Coordinate sock length with hiking boot length. The last thing you want is for your boots to be taller than the socks...

In whatever you buy, I'd generally stick to the rule that cotton is the enemy. Synthetics and silk dry out faster. Wool retains thermal value even when wet.
20grit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-11, 07:40 AM
  #10  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
The reason I asked about the weight is because the lighter weight stuff allows for a much lighter pack, which allows for much lighter boots. Taken to the extreme, like many long-distance thru-hikers, they basically walk in sneakers and their "dry weight" is less than 15lbs, iirc. They also sacrifice comfort in many ways. For example, they skimp on sleeping bag comfort figuring that if they get cold at 4 in the morning, they'll just get up and start walking. They often put in 30 mile days when I'll struggle with 15 and my creature comforts.

Anyway, here is what I recommend:

- Backpack: Something close to 70L. I have a Gregory Baltoro and I love it. It's about six pounds. The manufacture claims you can carry up to 60 pounds on this suspension. A good outdoor shop will know how measure your torso to match you up with the right size suspension. Osprey makes really good packs as well.
- Backpack rain cover. Since I won't be recommending a poncho, you'll need something to keep your pack contents dry in a downpour.
- Sleeping bag. I'm a big fan of goose down bags. They last longer and are generally much lighter and compress better. I even take one on most canoeing trips. But down bags have no insulating capacity when wet. So I would recommend a standard SYNTHETIC, 3 three season bag for you. Look for something around 20 degree rating and 3.5lb. If you can find something with a EN 13537 rating, that would be a much more accurate temperature rating. If you can, climb in one before you buy. Mummy bags try to limit dead air space to keep the comfort range low. This is bothersome to some people.
- Waterproof sleeping bag stuff sack. You want to be absolutely sure that if you're soaked, cold and tired at the end of the day that you can get a good night's sleep. Something like Sea to Summit eVent stuff sack.
- Tent. This will be supplied by your outfitter, but are you planning any shakedown trips? I think you're crazy if you don't. Look for something less than 4lb for a solo tent and something less than 6lb for two person. If you're not traveling alone, I recommend a two person tent and splitting the weight between two people.
- Crash pad. I like ThermaRest and I have several. I also carry a "chair kit" for mine. My regular one is 3lb and is now relegated to winter trips only. My new one is one lb.
- Stove. The biggest decision here is what fuel is readily available at your destination. It's unlikely you will be able to travel with any sort of fuel.
- Pot/kitchen set. Can you get by with just a nonstick titanium pot? Maybe 1.5 qt for two people. Anodized, nonstick aluminum is also satisfactory.
- Trekking poles. I have Komperdell aluminum ones (Leki and Black Diamond are other popular choices). I you have money to burn, you can get carbon fiber.
- Boots. Fit is key. With the class of weight you expect to carry, I think medium boots are in order. Asolo makes some fine boots. You can do full leather and treat them to be water proof or just get ones with gore-tex liners.
- Clothes. No cotton anywhere. Underwear and "long johns" should be polyester or polypropylene. You can get fancy with the weaves (some do wick better) and buy something with a fancy name (like UnderArmour), or just basic no-name stuff.
- Socks. I recommend wool blend. Thorlos or Smartwool are good brands. They come in a variety of thicknesses, so match them to the fit of your boot.

I'll add more later.
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-11, 10:57 AM
  #11  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Do you remember those stupid crocodile shoes that were all the rage last year or so? It turns out that they are lighter than air and feel much nicer on your feet than hiking boots after a long day.


They still look stupid, but this "ain't no fashion contest".
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-11, 11:10 AM
  #12  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
For raingear, I'm a big believer in GORE-TEX® fabric in rainwear. At this point, there are lots of types of outdoor shells using waterproof/breathable membranes and they have begun to specialize (fishing/Mountaineering/Hiking, et cetera). I tried a proprietary "clone", and it was fine. But it disappointed me in it's durability despite it being heavily reinforced. Still, it lasted more than ten years before being replaced with a Marmot Minimalist jacket (for free).

There is no waterproof/breathable membrane that can keep up with even mild exertion, so the ability to vent is important too. Look for "core vents" or "pit zips" in jackets (in pants, look for size zips) to allow air to circulate.

For the low temeratures you are describing, I would also recommend a polyester fleece liner (jacket and pant). 200wt or 300wt underneath a GoreTex shell will keep you comfy in camp. Fleece gloves and a fleece cap are also nice (sleep in the cap to stay warmer).
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-11, 11:20 AM
  #13  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
My feet sweat a bit while hiking. This has the unfortunate side effect of softening the skin at the same time as allowing more foot movement in the boot. This is an ideal recipe for blisters. You can (and should) carry (and know how to use) moleskin. But avoiding them in the first place is better.

For a weekend trip, I put three pairs of socks in a rotation and wear them for half a day's walk maximum. Changing at lunchtime and allowing my feet to dry while bare works for me - even in the winter (I'll bring an extra thin 3/4 length ridgerest to sit on in the snow). The unused pairs are hung on the outside of my pack to dry while I walk. For a week long trek, I would probably take four.
StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-11, 11:48 AM
  #14  
ModoVincere
Riding Heaven's Highways on the grand tour
 
ModoVincere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,675
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
Do you remember those stupid crocodile shoes that were all the rage last year or so? It turns out that they are lighter than air and feel much nicer on your feet than hiking boots after a long day.


They still look stupid, but this "ain't no fashion contest".
I'd rather die than wear those things.
__________________
1 bronze, 0 silver, 1 gold
ModoVincere is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-11, 01:38 PM
  #15  
Will G
Senior Member
 
Will G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Granbury, Texas
Posts: 710
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
There is a book by Colin Fletcher called "The Complete Walker." Basically almost everything you might want to know about hiking, camping, and how to avoid excess pain and suffering while enjoying the trek. Lots of suggestions regarding gear that he has tried in the field and day-to-day things you may not have thought about.

I would highly recommend that you "ops check" your gear. Get out on day hikes, then overnights, and then multi-overnights with hiking well in advance of your trip so you can fix problems with your equipment.....and there will be problems. Better to sort out the problems now than find out that what you thought would work at 8000 feet in Peru doesn't work at all. If you can find similar temps and weather conditions, so much the better.
Will G is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-11, 08:51 PM
  #16  
Bikernator
Below Par
Thread Starter
 
Bikernator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 196

Bikes: '13 Trek Stache 8; '08 Giant Rincon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Thanks for the responses. Jeebus, there's a lot of info here...


My cousin actually sells camping tents on an online business, so I'll probably look into that. We plan on going at least a couple weekends for some overnight hikes to work out the kinks.

I'm curious about 'crash pads.' Do you recomment foam or inflatable? I see there are some that can be integrated into sleeping bags. Thoughts there?

I haven't thought about the cookware. The guide will be providing it, but I'll do some more research for the prep-hikes. On the topic, what do you eat on the trail?? I have an enormous appetite, and know very few who eat more than I do, so I'm a little nervous about this part.

Would you say trekking poles are a requirement?

What do you mean by 'medium' boots? Do you mean medium height?

Okay, no cotton anywhere. Check. Do you have any links to what shirts you wear? Are there 'hiking' shirts, or are they essentially one in the same for fishing shirts? Still taking recommendations for pants/pants rain covers. Do you just wear waterproof pants, or a cover. I was thinking of thermals under the pants, as it gives me options for level of warmth. Same on the top, just bring a fleece shirt to put on when needed rather than an insulated jacket.

I'm (obviously) inexperienced in hiking, but well-versed in cold-weather duck-hunting, so I agree with the Gore-Tex completely. Fleece is best thing ever invented, in my book. It's the keeping warm/dry during strenuous activity I need direction on.

Wool socks concern me. My feat sweat A LOT, and during rugby season I'm constantly battling athlete's foot. When hiking they almost surely will not be cold. Perhaps a pair for sleeping, but are they the best for breathing as well?

How many pairs of what garments would you take on a 4-night hike?

I think I will get a book, now that I think about it. Good call.

Thanks for all the input. I appreciate the direction.
Bikernator is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-11, 06:18 AM
  #17  
20grit
Curmudgeon in Training
 
20grit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Rural Retreat, VA
Posts: 1,946

Bikes: 1974 Gazelle Champion Mondial, 2010 Cannondale Trail SL, 1988 Peugeot Nice, 1992ish Stumpjumper Comp,1990's Schwinn Moab

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bikernator View Post
Wool socks concern me. My feat sweat A LOT, and during rugby season I'm constantly battling athlete's foot. When hiking they almost surely will not be cold. Perhaps a pair for sleeping, but are they the best for breathing as well?
Sounds like you really need wool socks. You can get thinner wool socks if you'd like. There is nothing more miserable than a wet cotton/cotton blend sock. Wool on the other hand is usually fine when wet. It also won't stink as badly as cotton.
20grit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-11, 01:14 PM
  #18  
Sherpa
Junior Member
 
Sherpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: North Central Ohio
Posts: 10

Bikes: Orbea Gavia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bikernator View Post
Thanks for the responses. Jeebus, there's a lot of info here...

My cousin actually sells camping tents on an online business, so I'll probably look into that. We plan on going at least a couple weekends for some overnight hikes to work out the kinks.

Don't buy a cheap tent. They are heavy and they usually suck. I have 2 tents that I use frequently. A Marmot Swallow if I am car camping and a Hilleberg Nallo if I am backpacking. The Hilleberg is a tunnel tent and those are way cooler than a dome for ingress/egress if more than 1 person is in the tent. Hilleberg tents: http://www.hilleberg.com/home/products/3-person.php

I'm curious about 'crash pads.' Do you recomment foam or inflatable? I see there are some that can be integrated into sleeping bags. Thoughts there?

Get a self inflating Therm-a-rest and it will be fine. Oh and get the seat, it is worth it. I use the Trekker Lounge. http://cascadedesigns.com/therm-a-re...lounge/product

I haven't thought about the cookware. The guide will be providing it, but I'll do some more research for the prep-hikes. On the topic, what do you eat on the trail?? I have an enormous appetite, and know very few who eat more than I do, so I'm a little nervous about this part.

I think the Enertia Trail food is the best out there. Coleman recently bought them so some of the Coleman food is Enertia recipes and therefore edible. MountainHouse sucks! http://trailfoods.com/products.html

Would you say trekking poles are a requirement?

I don't use them but my wife does. They are especially helpful on decents because they take some of the shock that your knees would otherwise take. Your call on these. Do a couple of shakedown hikes and decide then.

What do you mean by 'medium' boots? Do you mean medium height?

I think SB is referring to the construction. There are lightweight (trailshoes), "medium", heavyweight (trekking), and mountaineering boots. As you go up the scale the boots gets beefier, heavier, and stiffer. I have a pair of La Sportiva Makalus and that would be overkill for your trip. Check into any companies medium weight hiking boots and get the best fitting. Go to the store and have them load up a backpack and walk around in them for an hour or so. Fit is the most important thing here. I would also recommend Gore-tex. I like boots by La Sportiva, Scarpa, Meindl, Kayland, and Lowa.

Okay, no cotton anywhere. Check. Do you have any links to what shirts you wear? Are there 'hiking' shirts, or are they essentially one in the same for fishing shirts? Still taking recommendations for pants/pants rain covers. Do you just wear waterproof pants, or a cover. I was thinking of thermals under the pants, as it gives me options for level of warmth. Same on the top, just bring a fleece shirt to put on when needed rather than an insulated jacket.

Most definitely NO COTTON. It is worthless once you start to sweat. I use the mountain hardware wicked light shirts and I love them. http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Men%...efault,pd.html

For bottoms I have a few pair of north face and mountain hardware convertible pants. The legs zip off and they turn into shorts when you get warm. I recommend that you dress in layers so you can shed or add layers as you need.


Wool socks concern me. My feat sweat A LOT, and during rugby season I'm constantly battling athlete's foot. When hiking they almost surely will not be cold. Perhaps a pair for sleeping, but are they the best for breathing as well?

I use wool socks when hiking but I also use a thin liner underneath them to prevent blisters and help wick away the sweat. Here is a selection from Campmor. http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/...=&colorFilter=

How many pairs of what garments would you take on a 4-night hike?

I think I will get a book, now that I think about it. Good call.

Thanks for all the input. I appreciate the direction.
Hope this helps a little. Let me know if you have any more questions. Oh and have fun....that would be an awesome trip!
Sherpa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-11, 04:51 PM
  #19  
StupidlyBrave 
Chepooka
 
StupidlyBrave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 1,170

Bikes: 1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Sherpa View Post
Hope this helps a little. Let me know if you have any more questions. Oh and have fun....that would be an awesome trip!
I agree with all of this. Except that I prefer MountainHouse FreezeDried food over other brands I've tried. My standard daily menu would be along the lines of: One or two packs of instant oatmeal for breakfast, peanut butter bagel for lunch, and a freeze dried dinner (labelled for 2, but I eat the whole thing) for dinner. I may also bring a couple of energy bars for snacks.

Sometimes, something to drink...

StupidlyBrave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-11, 07:39 PM
  #20  
bjtesch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Irving, TX
Posts: 358

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used to do a lot of backpacking, up to and including the length of your hike. We backpacked in the Utah desert and the Colorado mountains, but tried to avoid rainy times. I think my maximum pack weight was usually about 50 pounds. My brother-in-law was younger and tougher, one time he and a friend spent 2 months hiking north-south through most of Colorado. They carried 70 pound packs. They also mailed boxes of supplies to towns along the way, and they picked up the supplies periodically along their route.

There should be some outdoor shops in your city, or you can check REI for gear. For a long hike think LIGHT, and don't carry 2 or 3 if you can get by with 1.

Boots- I have heavy boots and light boots. Heavy boots help with foot support if you are hiking with a lot of weight on rough trails, but that is also a lot more weight to carry. I would recommend medium boots. If you are expecting wet conditions then maybe spend extra for gore-tex. Synthetic material or leather would work, but synthetic would require less breakin.
I never carried extra shoes but if you want something light to wear around camp then bring very light synthetic sandals or flipflops.
Socks- We used to wear thin liner socks (nylon?) and thick wool socks over these. This provided padding and insulation, the liner socks stick to your skin and don't rub so this helps with blisters. But you still have to worry about toes, small hot spots, etc. Moleskin is essential unless you know from experience that your feet will be fine. For shorter hikes I've used my normal cotton socks under the wool socks.
Pants- We usually wore cotton shorts only, even in Colorado when it would be freezing or below at night. If you expect a lot of rain then gore-tex shell pants would be appropriate, even better if the legs would come off. An extra pair of nylon shorts could come in handy for some conditions and would be light.
Underwear- I wore my normal cotton underwear, never any insulating underwear.
Shirts- We usually wore normal short sleeve t-shirts. For cold conditions you could bring a shirt with longer sleeves or a fleece sweatshirt, depending on expected temperatures. Fleece is light and can be insulating and comfortable even if wet.
I probably carried one pair of shorts, a couple of pair of underwear, and one or two extra shirts.
Coat- Your rain shell can be your outer coat. Combine it with the long sleeve shirt or fleece and this should be plenty of warmth.
Hat- Depends on how much sun you have and how much hair you have.

Sleeping bag- I recommend synthetic for rainy conditions, get a light one that matches the coolest temps you expect.
Pad- We always used the very light foam pads, about 1/2" thick. A good thermarest would be better but it is much heavier. Nowadays camping from my car I use thermarest, but tough it out with the thin pad for backpacking.

Stove- I started with a Svea123 then got a little folding stove that uses the separate SIG bottle (don't remember the brand). It all depends on what fuel you can get but white gas should be easy to find.
Cookware- I had a set of aluminum pots, we carried the pot and lid that would fit together with the stove inside. Carry a couple of butane lighters.
Eating gear- we carried a thin plastic bowl and a single spoon
Water bottles- we used the 1 quart Nalgene bottles. For purification I've used the iodine tablets but when they came out we bought the water pump/filter and used it.
Food- The lightest food is the good freeze-dried stuff sold at outdoor shops, but it is also expensive. If you study the grocery store you will find cheap lightweight food, stuff like Ramen noodles and you can put canned tuna or chicken in it. We carried things like "gorp" (raisins/peanuts/m&m's) for snacks, also sardines and crackers. For breakfast we used packages of oatmeal and swiss mix hot chocolate mix. We would sometimes carry things like canned stew and canned fruit to eat the first night.

Other stuff- small flashlight, small first aid kit, can opener, small pocket knife, extra shoestrings, small camera. Carry insect repellant and/or sunscreen if you need it.

Pack your stuff in zip-lock bags, using the bags to organize and waterproof your gear. If you take a variety of food then you can pack everything for one meal in one bag. Organize your pack so you can find things, put the things that you need during the day in outside pockets that are easy to get to, even if you have to ask your buddy to retrieve something while you are still wearing your pack.

We bought walking sticks but never used them.

Synthetic fabrics and wool are better for wet conditions, they will maintain insulation while wet. Cotton get wet and soggy and isn't comfortable. You can carry some cotton but pick and choose what can be cotton and what should be higher performance synthetic.
bjtesch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-11, 08:14 PM
  #21  
Sherpa
Junior Member
 
Sherpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: North Central Ohio
Posts: 10

Bikes: Orbea Gavia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
I agree with all of this. Except that I prefer MountainHouse FreezeDried food over other brands I've tried. My standard daily menu would be along the lines of: One or two packs of instant oatmeal for breakfast, peanut butter bagel for lunch, and a freeze dried dinner (labelled for 2, but I eat the whole thing) for dinner. I may also bring a couple of energy bars for snacks.

Sometimes, something to drink...
I haven't been able to find any MountainHouse stuff that I like but I haven't tried all that many. After I had their gray beef stew I kind of wrote them off. I will have to check into some of their other stuff. Have you tried the Enertia? some good eats there.

Do I spy a bottle of Jameson's Special Reserve? Great choice!
Sherpa is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service