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Is Cold Setting Frames for wider hubs a Hack?

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Is Cold Setting Frames for wider hubs a Hack?

Old 01-10-18, 06:13 PM
  #26  
Kontact
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
you can put something soft between the dropout and your lever. Like a rag
Right, and that will prevent crushing the paint, but not necessarily ovalizing the seat tube. And in saying that you didn't address the third contact point. Which is what I'm getting at - people don't necessarily think off everything when they are turning their frame into a bending machine.

Here's what your suggestion looks like:


Where's the towel on the head tube, seat stay and chain stay? People don't think all of this through.


How is my suggestion not both simpler and least likely to cause damage?

Last edited by Kontact; 01-10-18 at 06:21 PM.
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Old 01-10-18, 07:25 PM
  #27  
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So easy to miter some blocks to place under contact points.
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Old 01-10-18, 09:12 PM
  #28  
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actually, I'm pretty sure I never suggested anything, I just said what I do. I don't do it with a 2x4 levered off of the seat tube. My way is to hold the bike by the bottom bracket and then lever off of the table. I have a bb-sized post stuck in a piece of aluminum that I clamp to a table and a steel rod. The setup is in the shop getting modified so I can use it to hold bb shells in the drill press, so I can't take a pic right now.
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Old 01-10-18, 09:48 PM
  #29  
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Thanks, all. You did not disappoint.

The original narrow spaced bikes are (of course) built with the chainring(s) centered with the cogs on the rear hub. When you spread the frame for wider hubs, with more cogs to the right, doesn't this throw off the chainline, which is now no longer properly centered?

Or is this another measurement that most consider "close enough"? ...Just another part of doing this that I don't like.
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Old 01-10-18, 10:08 PM
  #30  
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We all do it our own way. I NEVER lever anything against another tube.

I have a variety of ways, but basically they're the same. Shore the frame supporting it so the stays are in space. Use an axle and nuts set into a dropout as a gauge, then grab one side of the rear triangle and lift or push.

Typically, I'll cradle the BB on the phonebook, put one foot on it to hold it down, and lift the near side. On frames where I worry about the bridges letting go (depends on the construction), I'll support the frame at the bridges, then with a friend holding the head down, I'll push the dropout down.

It's pretty easy, and as I said, I'm in complete control, knowing what's moving and how far.

That's not to say my way is best, or that other ways won't work, it's just how I do it.
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Old 01-11-18, 12:16 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
The original narrow spaced bikes are (of course) built with the chainring(s) centered with the cogs on the rear hub. When you spread the frame for wider hubs, with more cogs to the right, doesn't this throw off the chainline, which is now no longer properly centered?
there are also more cogs to the left, so it stays balanced. Certainly, there are more extreme angles to be had with large/large and small/small.
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Old 01-15-18, 03:47 PM
  #32  
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Sachs won't, which is good enough for me.

I don't mind leaving it up to the bike shops. I think when guys have dial indicators CNC parts, CNC fixtures, granite surface plates, and a bunch of other stuff that was designed for entirely more probable situations, then they bend frames out of their original settings... They might as well say "just so you know, all that stuff in my brochure is BS". I'd call it a kludge.

It is the case in metal working that when bending as in this situation, if you just spread the parts they must deflect evenly, one related example is that when you twist a square piece of stock it deforms into threads evenly along it's length. This can be relied upon to build simple machines. Except in this case the parts can't be expected to be even. But if they were bilaterally symmetrical they would. Even if they were built out identically, this is one case were the HAZ could affect the results by affecting the elastic limit of the tubes.
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Old 03-08-18, 12:19 AM
  #33  
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See, this issue goes on and on about proper way and clamping and the risk of bending or snapping. When I wanted more gears on ny Schwinn Probe and subsequently one or two other, all I did was flip it upside down, sat tge wheel on the drop outs and pulled. Pulled just enough for the wheel to drop in the drop outs. It's more coercive flexing, than bending. Ya know what happens if I hafta remove a wheel… after I knock it out, the frame shrinks right back to it's original standing, nothing is ruined, all steel has some flex in it. 2/3 MM is not(or shouldn't) hurt anything. That's going from a 5/6 speed to a 7, if you're trying to put a shimano 9/10 wheel on a Schwinn World Sport...pfft... well...
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Old 03-08-18, 12:14 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
When I wanted more gears on ny Schwinn Probe and subsequently one or two other, all I did was flip it upside down, sat tge wheel on the drop outs and pulled. Pulled just enough for the wheel to drop in the drop outs.
And it does work. Yabba-dabba-doo!
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Old 03-12-18, 06:46 AM
  #35  
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When I had my first custom bike built (a Paul Barkley Softride), it was right when rear spacing was trasitioning from 126 to 130mm. I was still on 126 at the time, but knew I'd be on 130's in the future. He built the rear spacing at 128 -- just 1mm flex per side going either way. And the funny thing is that I've never had the rear triangle cold set to 130mm, but those wheels now drop in without needing to "coerce" anything.
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Old 03-12-18, 07:12 AM
  #36  
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Sheldon covers it...but, I made a spreader from threaded rod, washers and wing nuts. I felt like that would give a more even "spread". No problems from that particular bike.
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Old 03-31-18, 06:38 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Stormsedge View Post
Sheldon covers it...but, I made a spreader from threaded rod, washers and wing nuts. I felt like that would give a more even "spread". No problems from that particular bike.
Did something similar, but I used the Park Tool drop out alignment tool to spread my dropouts, took some elbow grease to get it.. but worked fine for me
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