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Removing brazed on parts

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Removing brazed on parts

Old 06-09-24, 08:07 AM
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Removing brazed on parts

In my first go at brazing, I planned on removing the chainstay cable stop using the torch. It seemed removal needed a lot more heat than adding parts. So much heat that I was not comfortable, so I stopped with the torch and used a hacksaw and file. I'm pretty good with steel heat/colors, as I've done a fair amount of shade-tree heat treating...yet

Do you all think this difference in applied heat is typical, or due to my inexperience with brazing?

Last edited by BTinNYC; 06-09-24 at 08:14 AM.
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Old 06-09-24, 08:28 AM
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It was possibly held on with brass. Or on a production bike, it might have been spot welded on and then brazed. The remelt temperature for filler is always a bit higher than the filler's original melting temperature. Also, there usually is surface tension holding things together. Finally, the best technique is to heat just the braze on and let gravity take the part off. Having said all of that, I usually cut them off and file.
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Old 06-09-24, 05:24 PM
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You can concentrate the flame/heat into the braze-on rather than into the tubing to reduce the heat impact to the tubing. Helps to add some weight to the braze-on so it falls off a bit faster, clamp with pair of vice-grips or similar.
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Old 06-09-24, 05:54 PM
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Thanks Gents.
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Old 06-12-24, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by unterhausen
the best technique is to heat just the braze on and let gravity take the part off. Having said all of that, I usually cut them off and file.
+1 this. For a chainstay stop, I'd clamp a needle-nose vise-grip onto the stop, position it over a bucket of water it so gravity will make it drop into the water when the braze is molten. Keep the heat on the stop as much as possible. Once the stop has fallen off, use a wire brush to brush off as much of the molten braze from the stay as you quickly can manage. That will save you almost all of any clean-up needed.

N.B.I had to do this for literally hundreds of chainstay stops, when the marketing department suddenly decided that cable routing had to go under the bottom bracket rather than over the bottom bracket.
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Old 06-22-24, 01:04 PM
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Good idea to use a heat sink and water spray on adjacent parts.
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Old 06-22-24, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by JK360
Good idea to use a heat sink and water spray on adjacent parts.
Maybe. If you're wanting to protect as much paint as possible or worried about another braze on getting too hot due to its location to the one being removed then sure. But usually it's easy to aim the flame away from the rest of the frame when removing a braze on. I would never use a water spray to cool down an already hot part. Limiting the spray to be away from where you're aiming the torch and maintaining a consistent enough spray to keep the adjacent areas cool might get a tad messy and want a second pair of hands.

The classic is to wrap wet rags/paper towels and protect them with a cocoon of Al foil. The safest way is to cut, grind then sand and if one is careful likely to have the least lost paint (if that's a concern). Andy
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Old 06-22-24, 03:45 PM
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So this went well, since I'm good with a file and sandpaper to do the clean-up. I used too much solder on all the first bits. Got a bit of feel/confidence at the end.
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