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Picked up a new bike, what accessories should I get?

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Picked up a new bike, what accessories should I get?

Old 05-24-15, 08:22 PM
  #1  
naplesvin64
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Picked up a new bike, what accessories should I get?

Hey guys, I'm fairly new to biking as I just bought a 2015 TREK 7.4 FX from my local bike store. Aside from a helmet and pump, what else should I be looking at to pick up?
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Old 05-24-15, 08:48 PM
  #2  
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Not saying these are necessary, but, for some ideas ...

Cycling computer (I have Edge 510).
Top tube bag (where I keep my iPhone while it's connected to the Edge, plus laminated emergency numbers, credit cards, etc)
Saddle bag
Spare tube(s)
Patch kit
Multitool
Tire levers
Mini pump (with or without CO2 cartridges)
Lights
Water bottle cages
Water bottles
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Old 05-24-15, 08:49 PM
  #3  
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I would get the following:
spare tube or two
mini tool
patch kit
saddle bag
water bottle and cage
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Old 05-24-15, 09:01 PM
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I originally put my phone in a little handlebar mounted bag. But realized it was better to have it in a pocket (I like my cycling jersey back pockets) in a Ziploc baggie. I keep a laminated photocopy of my ID and healthcare/emergency contact info, a few bucks, and my phone in the (water/sweat proof) Ziploc bag. I also take along a fold-up self-contained rain jacket... more often than not... this time of year.
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Old 05-24-15, 09:23 PM
  #5  
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I have a saddle bag with.........

Tire levers
patch kit
spare tube
small vice grips
small metric hex key set
multi-tool
emergency poncho

I also suggest at minimum a set of front and rear blinking/steady mode lights and a small frame pump.
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Old 05-25-15, 12:46 AM
  #6  
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Lights before anything else! If you think you'll be riding at night, you need lights.
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Old 05-25-15, 05:48 AM
  #7  
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Some items to consider:

Gloves, shorts/bibs, jerseys, vest, jacket, arm & leg warmers, toe covers, beanie, cycling cap
Clipless pedals, shoes, cleats
Riding glasses
Lights
Computer
Mirror
Water Bottles
Chamois Cream
Lubes, cleaners
Tires, tubes, patches
CO2 or minipump
Tire levers
Nutrition products
Floor pump
Mini combo tool
Seat bag
Books.
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Old 05-25-15, 06:43 AM
  #8  
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First and foremost a saddle pack with flat repair kit and a class to learn how to use it. Everything else is personal choice.
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Old 05-25-15, 07:16 AM
  #9  
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Get a MIRROR.
A MIRROR is an essential safety accessory and I would never ride without one. They work particularly well on flatbars.

Other things to consider:
A bike co
  • mputer
is a great accessory. It's fun and instructive to know your speed and how many miles you've gone. Mine also displays the time which I like since I never wear a watch.
  • I have a saddlebag with the requisite supplies such as a patch kit and multi-tool. I've gotten one flat in 30 years so I wonder why I bother. I use the multi-tool but seldom on the road.
  • Water bottle is good, but many times I don't bother to drink any water until I get home.
  • Some people run lights in the day but I'm not sure how much more visible it makes them. I seldom ride in the dark but have a pair of lights just in case.
  • Get a small saddlebag to carry small stuff securely. Things like your car key, a little cash, perhaps your wallet. If you wear shorts with zippered pockets, you might not need the saddle bag.
  • I have a back rack with a removable bag. I seldom use it. If I was to get a rack again, I'd get one with a spring as it is much more practical.

Last edited by practical; 05-25-15 at 07:21 AM. Reason: formatting
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Old 05-25-15, 08:37 AM
  #10  
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Have fun.

Cycling Bib & shorts x7, Jersey, Glasses, Gloves, Arm Warmers, Knee Warmers, Cycling Socks, Shoe Covers, Rain Jacket (fluoro)
Pedals, Cleats, Mirror, Horn/Bell, Front & Rear lights (rechargable prefered), commuter rack, bicycle basket, chain ring guard
Bottle Cages x2, 2 quality water bottles, camelback is acceptable
Flat Repair Kit: Saddle bag or top tube bag, 2 spare inner tubes, tire patch kit, bike frame pump or CO2 x2 with head, 2 levers, multi tool with chain breaker, 20$ bill
Powermeter, Heartrate Monitor, Garmin Edge 510/810/1010
Strava (monthly premium optional)
Magnetic/Fluid Trainer, & Rollers, anti-microbial floring with sweat guard for the bike, training wheels for the trainer
Carbon Fiber Race wheels tubular with new tires for race day, + back up wheels for your team car incase you flat for quicker tire change
Trunk Rack, Roof Rack, Wallmount, Bike Stand Shimano, bug screen protector
Bicycle Work Stand, Chain Whip, Cassette Removal Tool, Crank removal tools, Wet/Dry Grease, Extra Bar Tape, Tape Measure, Level, Wire Cutter/Puller, electrical tape, truing stand, with spoke wrench
Spare bike in case of crash or repair needs on main bike
Extra bikes for other discipline, road race, commuter/grocery, grand fondo, mountain, cx, gravel, beach, folding, etc.
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Old 05-25-15, 09:41 AM
  #11  
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These sort of list can go on and on, you have to decide which is important for you right now and then later add as you go.

You got a new bike and a pump and helmet to go with it, this is where the LBS failed you by not selling you a few more items you needed right now. Most salespeople get a little scared that a customer is going to run once they start to pile on the stuff you need so they stop at just a couple of items, but you need the other stuff no matter where you buy the bike!

A pump isn't going to do you bit of good without an extra tube, a patch kit, tire levers and a saddle bag to put the stuff into. Two or three of those items they probably could have given you for free as a thank you gift and they would have been out maybe $5 tops! You'll eventually need some lube and chain cleaner, once you get to that point simply do a search here on the forum because that stuff has been written a lot about so no sense in writing another essay on that subject. Your chain will tell you when the time has arrived by making noise or feeling funny, but don't let the noise drag on because noise is accelerated wear.

Next you need to consider proper clothing. Jersey wise don't go crazy with expensive crap, all Jerseys are made of 100% polyester and it doesn't matter if you get a $15 one or a $115 dollar one they all work the same, sure the $110 dollar one will last 3 maybe 4 seasons, but a $15 one will last 2 maybe 3 seasons, do the math. Shorts though is a different story, cheap ones can bunch up on you and make you miserable, so spend your money on the shorts that you saved from buying a cheap jersey. On the short note you don't need butt cream unless your butt starts to suffer from sores, I've been riding for over 40 years including 10 years of racing and never used butt cream. Shoes, depending on how far you want to ride a lower costing $45 to $65 SPD shoe is fine for the beginner rider, once you start going over 65 miles approximately (depending on your feet) a more expensive shoe may become necessary, but your feet will tell you when it's time. On the shoe note comes pedals, for the time being just get some $45 dollar Shimano SPD pedals until such a time comes when you get really good and feel that a better pedal will serve you better. (starting out wise you could easily get away with a cheap stiff but walkable shoe with a cheap platform pedal if money is an issue).

Bike computer is not necessary, it's a nice tool to have but you won't die if you don't have one. If you decide to get one a wired computer is the most reliable and the cheapest to get, but most cyclists will think you're a noob if you don't use a wireless...ignore most cyclists if money is an issue.

If you can do basic repairs then get a good multi tool like the Park MTB3, this tool you can use on the road or at home, it's great. Again no need to buy one if mechanical repairing is something you can't handle.

All this buying stuff everyone mentioned is all about need, do you need it right now? Ask yourself that before you run out and drain your bank account. I suggest you start out with the basics as I mentioned and then once you become more of a avid cyclist see where you can make some purchases that you need to have to continue. And buy in steps, not all at once, also shop online for closeout and deep discount sales instead of at LBSs but don't go into an LBS and pick a salespersons brain then leave and buy it on line, the salesperson gets a commission for his time and doing that you robbed him of that.
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Old 05-25-15, 09:52 AM
  #12  
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Rack, if you plan on using it for commuting in any fashion.
Pannier, for the same reason as above.
Underseat toolbag, with a cycling multitool, patches, and a spare tube.
Water bottle and frame mount.

Other than that, you're good to go with what you should get "Right now", and you can even get away with none of the above, except the bottle and frame mount.
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Old 05-25-15, 10:08 AM
  #13  
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Depends on your priorities. I would put accessories into A, B, and C categories. some things, like lights and fenders might be A list things for some, B or C list priorities for others, depending on how you ride. But in general

The A list . Things you should have from day 1.
Helmet
Floor pump.
Spare tube.
Tire levers.
Multi tool
CO2 or frame pump.
Seat bag.
Water bottle and water bottle cage

The B list, or things that are incredibly useful or will increase your enjoyment or cycling :
A decent lock
Mirror
Eye protection
Better saddle
Good cycling shorts/tights
Cycling Gloves
Windbreaker or rain jacket
car rack for transporting bike
clipless pedals and shoes

The C list:
Cycling Jersey
Cycling socks.
Commuter rack, bags, and panniers
Cycling computer
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Old 05-25-15, 10:28 AM
  #14  
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In my city, a bell is mandatory.
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Old 05-25-15, 01:44 PM
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Safety Needs: Helmet, Gloves, Tire Fix Kit (spare tube, levers, patches, seat bag to put them in), Water Bottle(s)/cage(s), Floor pump, frame pump/co2 pump.

Comfort Needs: Bike Shorts

Performance Wants: Clipless Pedals, Clipless Shoes,

Comfort Wants: Jersey, socks,

Others: Cycling Computer (but a good smart phone can do most of the things that a beginner would want. Strava and MapMyRide apps are the most common), Racks, Lights, Bell, bike stand and more advanced tools

You'll eventually need something to clean and lube your chain and gear, but the lubrication that comes from the factory should last for a couple of hundred miles.

GH
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Old 05-26-15, 09:32 PM
  #16  
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Alrighty, I did a measely 10 miles to get a feel for the bike. Only complaint was the seat hurt like hell after 5 miles. That and I need to get a water bottle and cage that doesn't cost an arm and leg And will fit my bike. Thanks so far for the responses, it's giving me a list to pick up this weekend!

Last edited by naplesvin64; 05-26-15 at 09:40 PM.
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Old 05-27-15, 02:46 AM
  #17  
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Does the bike come with mud flaps? If it doesn't, don't bike in the rain.

Are you planning on using your bike to run errands? You might want to consider a rear rack to mount your bike bags to.

Lights? Bike computer?
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Old 05-27-15, 04:03 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by naplesvin64 View Post
Alrighty, I did a measely 10 miles to get a feel for the bike. Only complaint was the seat hurt like hell after 5 miles. That and I need to get a water bottle and cage that doesn't cost an arm and leg And will fit my bike. Thanks so far for the responses, it's giving me a list to pick up this weekend!
Bontrager RL is a great cage that is both cheap, lightweight, very durable, won't mar the bottle, and holds bottles very securely, and they come in a variety of colors. If you go cheaper than the $20 these cages cost you'll be replacing the cheaper cage after a season or two of use and or have bottles getting ejected while riding.

Water bottles can be really cheap if you want just a basic bottle, if you want something that will keep liquids colder longer than look at a 24 ounce Polar Bottle. By putting ice in one of these you can have a cold drink for up to 2 hours, in a regular bottle the coldness will last about 45 minutes in sunny above 80 degree day.
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Old 05-27-15, 04:52 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by naplesvin64 View Post
Alrighty, I did a measely 10 miles to get a feel for the bike. Only complaint was the seat hurt like hell after 5 miles. That and I need to get a water bottle and cage that doesn't cost an arm and leg And will fit my bike. Thanks so far for the responses, it's giving me a list to pick up this weekend!
Congrats on the bike! Enjoy it!

As mentioned earlier in the thread ---> Bike Shorts. They will help with the seat discomfort. I replaced the seat on my Trek 7.3 with a Selle. It wasn't cheap ($85) BUT, it helped tremendously. The shorts along with the seat is probably your answer. I would start with the shorts first.

One other thing to check for... how you are sitting on the saddle. You'll find if you sit back so the core of your body is sitting on the seat post, the ride will be more comfortable. I remember seeing a video on YouTube that made me more aware of how I was sitting. It will make a difference in the comfort of the ride.

Last edited by doug59; 05-27-15 at 07:37 AM.
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Old 05-27-15, 10:15 AM
  #20  
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I forgot to mention, if your bike shop has a sit bone measuring device, you should go and get measured and find out if the seat you currently have is the correct width, if not you can ask your LBS if they have a swap out saddle from another newly purchased bike they can exchange at no cost.
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Old 05-27-15, 12:26 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
I forgot to mention, if your bike shop has a sit bone measuring device, you should go and get measured and find out if the seat you currently have is the correct width, if not you can ask your LBS if they have a swap out saddle from another newly purchased bike they can exchange at no cost.
Timely post! I'll be going to the bike shop tomorrow to attend their free "how to fix a flat" class. I'll ask if they have a sit bone measuring device. Thanks!

Random responses:

A bell is mandatory in my area too.

I've been riding at least an hour a day, almost every day, to improve my skills from the raw beginner level (just learned to ride this month) to the "I still suck but at least I won't die" level. Sometimes I just wore regular pants/shorts and sometimes I wore bike shorts which I recently purchased (both are designed to look like normal shorts). The padding on the bike shorts do make a bit of a difference. My Zoic shorts have the thicker padding. I do try to play with where I place my sit bones on the seat, when I'm not focusing on some other skill that needs work. Sometimes though I finish my riding not noticing any soreness from the seat, regardless of whether I'm wearing bike shorts or my regular shorts/pants.

My bottle cage cost me about $5 or less at the bike shop. I'm currently using a Kleen Canteen bottle but might check out a Polar for longer rides as it gets hotter and hotter here.
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Old 05-27-15, 05:32 PM
  #22  
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Bells are mandatory in my town too but the city doesn't enforce it, which is a good thing because bells cannot be heard by motorists anyways, and besides it's safer to stop using both brakes then to try to ring a bell and stop at the same time. Can you tell that I don't like bells? I think they're useless, besides I can yell far louder than any bell. So perhaps if a bell seems a bit odd to you to check to see if your town enforces having one before buying something useless, check other cyclists and see if they have bells on their bikes...I really doubt it.
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Old 05-27-15, 06:54 PM
  #23  
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If you are new to cycling, you should ease yourself in gradually. 10 miles is really quite a long ride for a newbie.

Gloves or fingerless mitts serve several functions but the critical one is to protect your hands from being skinned should you take a slide. Hand injuries are really disabling and take ages to heal.

You don't need special cycling gear but it can make riding more comfortable. Padded shorts are worn with no underwear and washed after every ride, so you need a couple of pairs. I rarely use them now, only for rides over 1 1/2 hrs.
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Old 05-27-15, 07:26 PM
  #24  
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What kind of riding are you doing? Racing, charity events, long haul, commuting, fitness?

If you're commuting, get a nice riding backpack in a brite color....throw everything into that...I don't like having a bunch of stuff hanging on my bike.

Don't get cell phone holders or any of that crap....turn off the phone while riding and live free for a while....stick it in the backpack.

A nice backpack is my suggestion.... Best thing I ever bought for riding, besides my Cygolites.
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Old 05-28-15, 12:59 PM
  #25  
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Another thing that is mandatory in my area, if you have any intention of taking your bike outside your neighborhood, stopping somewhere to use the bathroom, grab a bite to eat, etc.: a U-lock. Some come with a bracket so you can mount it on your frame - my only complaint about that is if you put it in the wrong spot, your knees might get scratched by the bracket screws as you pedal.

The law doesn't require it but bike theft is common here.
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