Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Internal Gears & Belt-drive can be Big Boost for Cycling

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Internal Gears & Belt-drive can be Big Boost for Cycling

Old 06-02-15, 08:49 AM
  #26  
Doohickie
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,721

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
There's been a huge boom in urban transport cycling from fixies to the city rental bikes. City bikers will soon realize the advantages of IGH/belt & adopt it enthusiastically & the trend will spread to the bigger recreational market.
Nope, don't see it happening. Too far from the norm. You need a custom frame, custom cogs custom belt.... Too much custom and it's expensive.
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 08:54 AM
  #27  
Doohickie
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,721

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Belt drive will eventually cost less than chain/derailleur which requires intensive machining.
Only if they get volumes enough to lower prices of the components, which hasn't happened yet. And I wouldn't hold my breath.
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 08:57 AM
  #28  
Doohickie
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,721

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
I think it's not a huge obstacle.
No, but it's just one of many.
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 09:00 AM
  #29  
Doohickie
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Posts: 14,721

Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Real roadies will stick with derailleurs but in my area I see a lot of old fat guys twiddling around on carbon Cervelos & such. They might be inclined to moving to IGH/belt in a light sporty package.
Nope. IGH are heavier than derailleurs. Because they're old and fat (and have disposable income), they will spend the money to get the fastest bike they can get to make up for being old and fat. If they've bought a carbon fiber bike, they'll never consider IGH.
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.


Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 09:03 AM
  #30  
Rob_E
Senior Member
 
Rob_E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,709

Bikes: Downtube 8H, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 302 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 21 Posts
I'm a sucker for an IGH. I'd try a belt, no problem, but it also means a new frame that's belt-compatible. I've done some of the shopping. If you want to run an IGH, it makes sense to go with horizontal dropouts to avoid needing a chain tensioner. If you want to run a belt drive, you now need a special frame that can pass the belt through. You also want to verify that the belt drive is compatible with the hub you want to use.

I'm sold on the convenience. I got to work with greasy hands today because I had to play with my chain on the way in. But I don't think the market is there yet. Deciding you want a belt drive really limits your bike options.
Rob_E is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 11:35 AM
  #31  
enigmaT120
Senior Member
 
enigmaT120's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Falls City, OR
Posts: 1,965

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Fargo 2, Rocky Mountain Fusion, circa '93

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
My problem is the IGH I want costs almost as much as my Fargo.
enigmaT120 is offline  
Old 06-02-15, 01:35 PM
  #32  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 12,303

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1444 Post(s)
Liked 652 Times in 406 Posts
The main things preventing more people from bicycle-commuting are:
1. don't want to ride in inclement weather
2. no place to park bike
3. bike will get stolen

I don't think IGH or belt drives are a significant answer to any of the above.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 10:29 AM
  #33  
Robert C
Senior Member
 
Robert C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 2,219

Bikes: This list got too long: several ‘bents, an urban utility e-bike, and a dahon D7 that my daughter has absconded with.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
The main things preventing more people from bicycle-commuting are:
1. don't want to ride in inclement weather
2. no place to park bike
3. bike will get stolen

I don't think IGH or belt drives are a significant answer to any of the above.
You forgot:
4. Too much effort


The belt-drive appeals to people who already ride and are looking for a lower maintenance/cleaner bike. I cannot see a first time buyer even considering one.

The only "innovation" in bicycles that has a chance of significantly increasing ridership in the US is e-bikes.
Robert C is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 11:00 AM
  #34  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,430

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,166 Times in 784 Posts
Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
Wasn't it like three or four years ago when it looked like belt drives might catch on, but the vast majority of those models are no longer around due to lack of sales.
Although there was a brief burst of PR flackery a few years about the alleged advantages of belt drive, I don't believe there ever was a hint of belt drives catching on in any market..
IGH equipped bikes, especially relatively simple and reasonably priced units, are very practical for non competitive local cycling. Belt drive offers little to insignificant to no added value for the typical cyclist and are an alleged solution to a non existing problem, and a pricey solution at that.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 12:49 PM
  #35  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Mountain View, CA USA and Golden, CO USA
Posts: 6,341

Bikes: 97 Litespeed, 50-39-30x13-26 10 cogs, Campagnolo Ultrashift, retroreflective rims on SON28/PowerTap hubs

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Liked 320 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I would LOVE an IGH commuter (6 speeds ish?) with a belt drive. That would be optimal.

The thing is, while derailleurs are complicated, if you don't mess with them, they'll "work" for a long time. They won't work well if not adjusted, but they will WORK. I had bikes as a kid with derailleurs that worked and shifted for years without adjustments.
Once the cables and housings settle no adjustments are necessary until they need replacement or you bend something.

Shifting like I have ADHD I get 2500 - 4500 miles out of rear cables depending on the shifter and 4000 (lined) - indefinite (unlined) life out of rear housings.

Other people manage 10,000 - 20,000 miles.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 01:46 PM
  #36  
ColaJacket
Senior Member
 
ColaJacket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,892

Bikes: Fuji Sportif 1.3 C - 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by John Lesar View Post
Belt drive bikes require a seat or chain stay that can be separated to allow belt installation.
Wouldn't the ideal setup be a bike without a seat stay? Don't some triathalon bikes already do this?

An IGH bike doesn't need to be UCI compliant.

GH
ColaJacket is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 02:14 PM
  #37  
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
Wasn't it like three or four years ago when it looked like belt drives might catch on, but the vast majority of those models are no longer around due to lack of sales.
Ya know, I'd bet that the average cyclist has such a firm mental picture of a bicycle that a chain driven bicycle is what a bicycle is supposed to look like they can't bring themselves to ride/buy anything else.
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 02:22 PM
  #38  
SlimAgainSoon
Senior Member
 
SlimAgainSoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Down South
Posts: 1,267
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'm waiting for the belt that has a quick-connect link of some kind.

Would it take a giant trick of engineering to design one?

I don't think so.

This would remove the need for a tricky frame with two-part chainstays or seatstays, which is what you have to have now.
SlimAgainSoon is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 08:01 PM
  #39  
Dahon.Steve
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 7,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Robert C View Post
You forgot:
4. Too much effort
5. Too dangerous to ride in rush hour traffic.

The bike I use the most is a 3 speed from Bikes Direct. However, it came with a chain cover that works great.

You can Google all the problems people are having with the Nexus 8 or 7. Prices for the SpeedHub continue to go up with time and they are never on sale.
Dahon.Steve is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 10:41 PM
  #40  
Sangetsu
Senior Member
 
Sangetsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: 東京都
Posts: 842
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 565 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 23 Times in 14 Posts
Here in Japan many people use a bicycle regularly, and though there are belt-driven bikes, and even a few shaft-driven versions, 99.9% of bikes use chains. The simple solution to chains is a chain guard which fully encases the chain, and lube is added by lifting up an access cover. Since most neighbourhoods have a bike shop or repair shop of some type, getting the chain oil, or tire inflated is no problem.

Most bikes here are single speed types, some have internal gears, some have derailleurs, but most commuters seem reluctant to shift, regardless of the system. Even in when I worked in a shop in America, there were many 18 or 21 speed bikes which came into the shop for repairs, and I noticed that sometimes the cables or shifters were frozen from lack of use. The bikes were ridden regularly, but the riders never bothered with the gears.

My wife is from Japan, and has been riding a bike since she was 5 years old. When we first started riding together, I noticed she never shifted the gears on her bike. It was only after many rides that she became comfortable with using the gears, even though she had been using the same bike since she was in high school. Now she uses them without thinking.

I don't think that the type of drive or transmission is very relevant to most new riders, they are more likely to be interested in the colour and the thickness of the seat.
Sangetsu is offline  
Old 06-04-15, 11:32 PM
  #41  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by HauntedMyst View Post
I have a belt drive coupled with a NuVinci 360 on my commuter bike. It's awesome for around town. Quiet, very smooth and thus far flawless. This is Chicago so I can't speak for hill use but I'd love to have it on my big dummy. The bike itself is very heavy and the hub alone weighs about 5 pounds. I think the market is there for belts and IGH's but it's going to be a very long adoption period. The weight has to come down for urbanites who need to carry their bikes up stairs to store them inside and until they are price competitive with chains and derailleurs, I don't see them reaching critical mass.
NuVinci is rather heavy as is the Pinion. But folks that have to tote bikes up steps into apartments likely also worry about bike getting things dirty in cramped apartments. So some might be willing to live with the weight. Apartment dwellers also have less room/access for maintenance.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 06-05-15, 12:05 AM
  #42  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
Only if they get volumes enough to lower prices of the components, which hasn't happened yet. And I wouldn't hold my breath.

In the old days Sturmey-Archer hubs were pretty cheap & derailleurs were expensive & exotic. But 70's bike boom glorified racy derailleurs & folks happily spent 2 or 3X the money on "10-speeds" that they would have spent on an old Schwinn. The bike market will now follow the auto market in emphasizing reliability & ease of use/maintenance.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 06-05-15, 12:49 PM
  #43  
Rob_E
Senior Member
 
Rob_E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,709

Bikes: Downtube 8H, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 302 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 21 Posts
I think gear hubs and belt drives have great utility for a lot of commuters, or would if they were more accessible. But I have to agree that oily chains is not a reason why people don't commute. More complex gearing... maybe. I know people who haven't ridden in a while and find the system of 20+ gears with 2 shifters to be intimidating (and, in truth, thinking about "appropriate shift patterns" gives me a headache), but I don't think that has a lot of bearing on why they don't ride. In the US, almost everyone grows up learning to ride a bike, and almost everyone grows out of it as soon as they learn to drive. A car will often get you to work faster, safe from the elements, not sweaty, and carrying everything you could likely want to bring with you, and, most importantly, a car is the default. We can, and should, make arguments why bike commuting might be a viable and even better option to get around, but I don't think, "look, no chain!" is going to convince anyone. I think you probably have to ride with a chain and with an assortment of gear clusters (or no gears at all) before you can see the benefit that hub gears and belt drives may offer (and many experienced cyclists are not convinced). I think we are seeing more people forgoing car ownership and using alternative transport, including bicycles, but I think it's going to be new riders who will try, and maybe adopt, some new technologies rather than the new technologies luring in new riders.

Exception possibly being some of the enclosed, electric bikes that are entering the market. They seem like they might be a good transition between a car and a bike for people reluctant to leave their cars behind.
Rob_E is offline  
Old 06-05-15, 10:11 PM
  #44  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
Ya know, I'd bet that the average cyclist has such a firm mental picture of a bicycle that a chain driven bicycle is what a bicycle is supposed to look like they can't bring themselves to ride/buy anything else.
Tastes & perceptions can change quickly as seen in the 70's road bike boom & the 80's mtb boom. Same thing with cars: Americans' concept of the most desirable car quickly changed from a Cadillac-type yacht to German makes with firm seats & suspension. Fixies/SS bikes used to be very rare & ridden only by a few racers who happened to have an old track frame lying around. Now they're seen everywhere in hip urban areas.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 06-05-15, 10:34 PM
  #45  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
Here in Japan many people use a bicycle regularly, and though there are belt-driven bikes, and even a few shaft-driven versions, 99.9% of bikes use chains. The simple solution to chains is a chain guard which fully encases the chain, and lube is added by lifting up an access cover. Since most neighbourhoods have a bike shop or repair shop of some type, getting the chain oil, or tire inflated is no problem.

Most bikes here are single speed types, some have internal gears, some have derailleurs, but most commuters seem reluctant to shift, regardless of the system. Even in when I worked in a shop in America, there were many 18 or 21 speed bikes which came into the shop for repairs, and I noticed that sometimes the cables or shifters were frozen from lack of use. The bikes were ridden regularly, but the riders never bothered with the gears.

My wife is from Japan, and has been riding a bike since she was 5 years old. When we first started riding together, I noticed she never shifted the gears on her bike. It was only after many rides that she became comfortable with using the gears, even though she had been using the same bike since she was in high school. Now she uses them without thinking.

I don't think that the type of drive or transmission is very relevant to most new riders, they are more likely to be interested in the colour and the thickness of the seat.
Some interesting comments, thanks. Japan has huge # of commuters plus weather can be rainy. I guess chain covers can keep most of grit off the chain but isn't there the problem of "clanking" when going over bumps? BTW I read a web page about cycling in Japan that mentioned a Tokyo (IIRC) college where students were forbidden to bike commute! There wasn't enough space for student bike racks so bike commuting was a privilege reserved for faculty.

Amsterdam another bike commuting hotspot. I've heard some Dutch riders use enclosed chains but I think most bikes don't have them. Apparently a lot of riders keep their commuters locked up outside exposed to the elements so there's a big potential market for belt-drive there. Cycling also popular in Scandinavia where folks probably aren't crazy about doing chain maintenance in freezing weather.

A local friend lived in the Netherlands for years & rode a bike over there a lot. She & husband/kids all have nice bikes but they don't ride much & have ~zero concept of bike maintenance...they leave their bikes outside the house despite ample room inside.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 06-05-15, 11:23 PM
  #46  
DropBarFan
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,150

Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 49 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Rob_E View Post
I think gear hubs and belt drives have great utility for a lot of commuters, or would if they were more accessible. But I have to agree that oily chains is not a reason why people don't commute. More complex gearing... maybe. I know people who haven't ridden in a while and find the system of 20+ gears with 2 shifters to be intimidating (and, in truth, thinking about "appropriate shift patterns" gives me a headache), but I don't think that has a lot of bearing on why they don't ride. In the US, almost everyone grows up learning to ride a bike, and almost everyone grows out of it as soon as they learn to drive. A car will often get you to work faster, safe from the elements, not sweaty, and carrying everything you could likely want to bring with you, and, most importantly, a car is the default. We can, and should, make arguments why bike commuting might be a viable and even better option to get around, but I don't think, "look, no chain!" is going to convince anyone. I think you probably have to ride with a chain and with an assortment of gear clusters (or no gears at all) before you can see the benefit that hub gears and belt drives may offer (and many experienced cyclists are not convinced). I think we are seeing more people forgoing car ownership and using alternative transport, including bicycles, but I think it's going to be new riders who will try, and maybe adopt, some new technologies rather than the new technologies luring in new riders.

Exception possibly being some of the enclosed, electric bikes that are entering the market. They seem like they might be a good transition between a car and a bike for people reluctant to leave their cars behind.
Sure, IGH/belt-drive is not going to snap folks into being enthusiastic cyclists but it gets rid of some of the complications. With increasing expense of car ownership & terrible traffic there's lots of people riding just to save time/money in transport even if they weren't hardcore bikers.

BTW folders now a common sight, like IGH/belt they cost more than a regular bike but offer great convenience for many commuters. I always thought car + folder commuting would work great for many. Drive most of the way to downtown but park a couple miles outside & then ride the folder past blocks of gridlock.

E-bikes are getting big. A friend bought one & rides a lot more with the electric boost that makes hills manageable for less-fit riders. Model built for German/N Euro market & is advanced tech for the price with hydraulic brakes, fenders, rack & light set . InCycle TV show had interview with Greg Lemond where he endorsed e-bikes as a good way to get folks on a bike.

Folding bikes now common sight on bike path.
DropBarFan is offline  
Old 06-06-15, 08:56 AM
  #47  
Robert C
Senior Member
 
Robert C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 2,219

Bikes: This list got too long: several ‘bents, an urban utility e-bike, and a dahon D7 that my daughter has absconded with.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Drive most of the way to downtown but park a couple miles outside & then ride the folder past blocks of gridlock.
I used to do this when I was a technician, Not a folder but a regular bike in my van. The van was a nuisance to find parking for; so I would drive my van to a central point and bike to the service calls.
Robert C is offline  
Old 06-06-15, 10:02 AM
  #48  
hueyhoolihan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
Posts: 6,681

Bikes: 8 ss bikes, 1 5-speed touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Robert C View Post
You forgot:
4. Too much effort


The belt-drive appeals to people who already ride and are looking for a lower maintenance/cleaner bike. I cannot see a first time buyer even considering one.

The only "innovation" in bicycles that has a chance of significantly increasing ridership in the US is e-bikes.
on target, IMO, and...

4) leads to 5) sweaty, stinky bodies that some people cannot abide, in themselves or others. a 'bird bath' in the restroom, and complete change of clean clothes, was sufficient for me. although i have to admit i never solicited an opinion from my work mates.
hueyhoolihan is offline  
Old 06-06-15, 03:02 PM
  #49  
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Posts: 6,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Something else to consider. Back in the 80's,a couple companies put out motorcycles with EFI. But they had issues,so they didn't catch on. BMW used their car experience to put it on their motorcycles in the 90's,and the industry slowly started to change with their success. Now even Harleys are fuel injected.

The first bike belt drives had issues. Noise,belts coming off,pulley wear,jamming up in the snow. I think all the hype,followed by some teething problems has cooled people's interest in belts. I think once the technology matures they'll become more common. Suspension and disc brakes used to be exotic on bicycles,now they're commonplace.
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X
dynaryder is offline  
Old 06-07-15, 10:24 AM
  #50  
Short Cut
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: NorCal
Posts: 74
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
5. Too dangerous to ride in rush hour traffic.

The bike I use the most is a 3 speed from Bikes Direct. However, it came with a chain cover that works great.

You can Google all the problems people are having with the Nexus 8 or 7. Prices for the SpeedHub continue to go up with time and they are never on sale.
6. Want to ride with their work pants and shoes without clipping them up.

I like the idea and the ride of a belt drive. I considered them before my most recent purchase. However a chain or belt guard was what I needed most. Ended up with a Vanmoof which has a fully enclosed chain drive and an Alfine 8. I'm quite happy with it and it will buy me time to see how the belt drive develops.

The tech at my LBS said the Alfine most often only need one early adjustment when the cable guides wear in. After that you're good to go and that initial adjustment takes only a few minutes.
Short Cut is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.