Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Update old bike or Upgrade to new bike?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Update old bike or Upgrade to new bike?

Old 06-08-15, 02:30 PM
  #1  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Update old bike or Upgrade to new bike?

Howdy Folks, looking for a shove in one direction or another. I am a 54 year old Retired Marine who rides every morning before work and with the Wife on many weekends. I have been riding a 1993 Bianchi Ibex (solid forks) and must have 10k+ miles on the thing. Someone might say I am full of BS but up until 2 years a go it had the original tires & tubes on it. Still has original brake pads. I finally got rid of the knobbies and put some Kenda high pressure hybrid style tires on. Sure makes for easier going.
Took it to a shop and had the shifters/cable adjusted and the guy said I could likely use a new chain, but due to age would need a new hub, cassette or whatever it is called. Besides that the bike is still extremely roadworthy. My dilemma is to update or get a new bike. Believe me, I will justify anything to the Wife to get what I want and she knows I am good at it.

I really am attached to the old Bianchi, but will need to spend $150 or so to make it perfect again. If I don't fix it up then I'll just buy a Trek FX.

I bought the bike at the Marine Corps Exchange. They were $574, but sat there forever (None of us Marines could afford them). I was eyeballing it for about a week when a clerk told me that it would be a "red tag" soon meaning 1/2 price. I went every day at lunch and finally took it away for under $290.
$13 a year that bike has cost me!
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 02:35 PM
  #2  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,550

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1195 Post(s)
Liked 871 Times in 425 Posts
If it rides good and fits good, Fix it up.
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 02:37 PM
  #3  
chikon2000
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you are really attached to the bike, then it seems well-worth the $150 to get it up to snuff. The Trek would cost more, and would probably be less cool than the Bianchi.
chikon2000 is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:06 PM
  #4  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 202 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by Retiredguns View Post
Howdy Folks, looking for a shove in one direction or another. I am a 54 year old Retired Marine who rides every morning before work and with the Wife on many weekends. I have been riding a 1993 Bianchi Ibex (solid forks) and must have 10k+ miles on the thing. Someone might say I am full of BS but up until 2 years a go it had the original tires & tubes on it. Still has original brake pads. I finally got rid of the knobbies and put some Kenda high pressure hybrid style tires on. Sure makes for easier going.
Took it to a shop and had the shifters/cable adjusted and the guy said I could likely use a new chain, but due to age would need a new hub, cassette or whatever it is called. Besides that the bike is still extremely roadworthy. My dilemma is to update or get a new bike. Believe me, I will justify anything to the Wife to get what I want and she knows I am good at it.

I really am attached to the old Bianchi, but will need to spend $150 or so to make it perfect again. If I don't fix it up then I'll just buy a Trek FX.

I bought the bike at the Marine Corps Exchange. They were $574, but sat there forever (None of us Marines could afford them). I was eyeballing it for about a week when a clerk told me that it would be a "red tag" soon meaning 1/2 price. I went every day at lunch and finally took it away for under $290.
$13 a year that bike has cost me!
The mechanic isn't blowing smoke. Not unreasonable that a bike with over 20 years of use would need a new chain and cassette or freewheel. If you like the bike, it is worth repairing. It is an old, and by modern standards heavy mountain bike. But those old frames ride really nice. You really will need to spend between $500 and $1000 to get something significantly better. (and if you want a lugged steel frame, be prepared to spend $2,000 or more) for a complete bike.

Last edited by MRT2; 06-08-15 at 03:09 PM.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:09 PM
  #5  
vatdim
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Sofia, Bulgaria, EU
Posts: 186

Bikes: Drag Grizzly, Raleigh Pioneer Venture GT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The Trek would cost more, but it'd also be a new bike, with new wheels, new chainring, a new stem, new handlebars, new brake levers, new shifters, new everything. It'll be a couple of years before you begin to worry about any new parts, except for possibly brake pads or tubes.

The Bianchi on the other hand has a very rigid and reliable frame. It has not faulted you for so many years and will likely continue to serve you well in the foreseeable future. You have probably developed some sort of attachment to it.

The way I see it, get the Trek, try it out and see if it makes you happy. If it does, then good for you. If not, sell it on while it's still in a less used condition and use the proceeds to fund your Bianchi restoration. This way you'll have tried the alternative and you'll be able to go back if it doesn't feel right for you.

Last edited by vatdim; 06-08-15 at 03:59 PM.
vatdim is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:16 PM
  #6  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies. I'll go ride some Treks this weekend. Another dealer has Giants so may look at those as well.

On the freewheel/hub/cassette whatever, the tech said it wasn't that mine was bad, just so dated they don't make them like that anymore and a new chain would not wear right.
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:22 PM
  #7  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,331 Times in 839 Posts
Retired with a Good sized Pension then DIY time is there , only you can judge the 'Worth it' .. values
fietsbob is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:33 PM
  #8  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 2,077

Bikes: Old Stuff

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 831 Post(s)
Liked 359 Times in 249 Posts
Retiredguns, I am currently on a thirty four year old bike I bought new. Buy any thing you like but don't get rid of the Bianchi. Time to start a collection!
FBOATSB is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:40 PM
  #9  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Retired with a Good sized Pension then DIY time is there , only you can judge the 'Worth it' .. values
I had to chuckle a bit there. I retired from the Corps at age 40 as a Gunsmith. Gunnys don't get a whole lot! A week later I was working for a major telecom and am now an Engineer who designs and builds coax and fiber networks. A far cry from fixin' guns, but always up for a change!
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 03:41 PM
  #10  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 202 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by Retiredguns View Post
Thanks for the replies. I'll go ride some Treks this weekend. Another dealer has Giants so may look at those as well.

On the freewheel/hub/cassette whatever, the tech said it wasn't that mine was bad, just so dated they don't make them like that anymore and a new chain would not wear right.
I replaced the chain and freewheel on my 1997 Bianchi a few years ago. It is a standard thing to on older bikes to replace the chain and freewheel at the same time. (and a 7 speed, which yours is, won't be that expensive)
MRT2 is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 04:04 PM
  #11  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,835

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1568 Post(s)
Liked 1,549 Times in 979 Posts
I'm sure you don't want to listen to me, since both my mountain bikes are steel from the 90's, but if you really like it and the frame is in good shape and not beat up and rusted, I'd fix it up. $150 seems super cheap to get it back on the road. I won't tell you how much I have in my old mountain bikes.

John
70sSanO is online now  
Old 06-08-15, 04:51 PM
  #12  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, leaning towards just fixin' up the old bike at this point. Now I am considering trying it myself, but don't want to buy the wrong parts.

Here's the old beater.

Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 05:18 PM
  #13  
ltxi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,719
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 258 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBOATSB View Post
Retiredguns, I am currently on a thirty four year old bike I bought new. Buy any thing you like but don't get rid of the Bianchi. Time to start a collection!
Right on target. My 34 year old Fuji got retired to collector status this year. Wasn't givin' it up until I after the honeymoon knew I liked the new bike better as a daily driver. That I now know I do, but old faithful Fuji ain't goin' nowhere.

My mountain bike is '95 Trek. Kinda a tank, but it not be going nowhere, either.

Last edited by ltxi; 06-08-15 at 05:21 PM.
ltxi is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 06:18 PM
  #14  
hillyman
WALSTIB
 
hillyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,798
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 280 Post(s)
Liked 381 Times in 183 Posts
Retiredguns that bike is sharp. You owe it to the bike gods to keep her rolling strong. Well worth $150 to replace some parts. You could do it yourself but with cost of buying bike tools may not save that much. But most bike repairs not really that hard with proper tools. Should be a piece of cake for an engineer
__________________
www.bikeleague.org

hillyman is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 06:48 PM
  #15  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah tools are more than some parts. With 2 grown Daughters I became one heckuva used car mechanic. I'm sure I could replace the cassette & chain, but I'll let the shop do it and tweak anything else they think necessary.
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 06:59 PM
  #16  
Wingsprint
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 389
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fix it up! I believe that frame lugged Tange steel.
Wingsprint is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 07:46 PM
  #17  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Lugged steel
Tange chrome-moly Bianchi Superset II
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 08:29 PM
  #18  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Retiredguns View Post
Howdy Folks, looking for a shove in one direction or another. I am a 54 year old Retired Marine who rides every morning before work and with the Wife on many weekends. I have been riding a 1993 Bianchi Ibex (solid forks) and must have 10k+ miles on the thing. Someone might say I am full of BS but up until 2 years a go it had the original tires & tubes on it. Still has original brake pads. I finally got rid of the knobbies and put some Kenda high pressure hybrid style tires on. Sure makes for easier going.
Took it to a shop and had the shifters/cable adjusted and the guy said I could likely use a new chain, but due to age would need a new hub, cassette or whatever it is called. Besides that the bike is still extremely roadworthy. My dilemma is to update or get a new bike. Believe me, I will justify anything to the Wife to get what I want and she knows I am good at it.

I really am attached to the old Bianchi, but will need to spend $150 or so to make it perfect again. If I don't fix it up then I'll just buy a Trek FX.

I bought the bike at the Marine Corps Exchange. They were $574, but sat there forever (None of us Marines could afford them). I was eyeballing it for about a week when a clerk told me that it would be a "red tag" soon meaning 1/2 price. I went every day at lunch and finally took it away for under $290.
$13 a year that bike has cost me!
No one would say you were hasty in replacing your Bianchi if you bought a new bike. Haha You got my shove to replace it.
cale is offline  
Old 06-08-15, 08:55 PM
  #19  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cale View Post
No one would say you were hasty in replacing your Bianchi if you bought a new bike. Haha You got my shove to replace it.
Yeah there's that fact. At what price point do I get a "better" bike? I like the ridgid feel, don't need suspension or more gears and weight is not a huge deal.
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 02:16 AM
  #20  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 634 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Retiredguns View Post
Took it to a shop and had the shifters/cable adjusted and the guy said I could likely use a new chain, but due to age would need a new hub, cassette or whatever it is called. Besides that the bike is still extremely roadworthy. My dilemma is to update or get a new bike...

I really am attached to the old Bianchi, but will need to spend $150 or so to make it perfect again.
If you like the bike, fix it up and keep on using it. You can replace the chain and cassette on your ol' Bianchi for A LOT less than $150. Heck, you could probably do it for under $50, even if you need to buy the tools for the job as well.

For the gears on the rear wheel, I don't know if your '93 Bianchi Ibex has a cassette or freewheel. They're both inexpensive, but only one will fit. There's a page on Sheldon Brown's site that illustrates the differences between the two so you can figure out which you have:
Freewheel or Cassette?

If you need a cassette, a Shimano HG41 costs $12.76 from Niagara Cycle:
Shimano Acera HG41 7 Speed 11-28t Cassette

If you need a freewheel, a Shimano TZ-21 will set you back $9.99:
Shimano TZ-21 Tourney 7-Speed Freewheel - 14-28T

A KMC Z51 chain would work with either, and that would set you back a whopping $6.77:
KMC Z51 Chain 6/7/8 Speed 1/2" x 3/32" Brown

So you're up to about $20 total, plus maybe another $20 if you need a cassette/freewheel tool and chain tool.

Originally Posted by Retiredguns View Post
On the freewheel/hub/cassette whatever, the tech said it wasn't that mine was bad, just so dated they don't make them like that anymore and a new chain would not wear right.
I have no doubt that your chain and cogs are worn and probably need replacing. Your bike would have to be a LOT older for replacement parts to be unavailable, though.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 05:54 AM
  #21  
habilis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Morris County, NJ
Posts: 1,102

Bikes: 90's Bianchi Premio, Raleigh-framed fixed gear, Trek 3500, Centurion hybrid, Dunelt 3-spd, Trek 800

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Her's a Youtube clip that shows how to remove and replace a freewheel without special tools:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsVL1XqZve8
habilis is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 06:03 AM
  #22  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,342

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 168 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5434 Post(s)
Liked 2,264 Times in 1,469 Posts
That's a really sweet bike with a great story. If you thought $290 was expensive back in the day, just see how much a modern equivalent quality bike will cost.
bikemig is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 06:34 AM
  #23  
Mickey2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm amased at how long your rims have lasted, not to mention tires and brake blocks. Sand and gritt have chewed through the best of rims in less than two years on my bikes. On the other hand, I have had a pair of steel rims on an old three speed still in acceptable shape. If you like the frame, the riding positon, and know the differences between frame shapes and riding feel I would not hesitate to fix up the old bike. It's not always about the money, it is about getting the type of bike and componets you want. Sometimes an old bike has all you are looking for ;- )

I have been through all kinds of bike, from racer to treckingbike, city bike, MTB and hybrid. I don't tackle anything tougher than gravel road, mostly pavement and cobble stone, most bikes are fine with them. I recently fixed up my bike I bought as a teenager in the 1980s, hub brakes and gear hub. After a bit of cleaning, and oiling, tightening spokes, new wires and tires it runs fine. I am surpised at how well parts have stood up to time and a lot of wear and abuse. This bike has never had the service and upkeep it should have had and still it only needed a basic service to run smooth again.

.
Bikes can be about fashion and trends too, at some point all bikes became a sort of derivative of the moutain bike or the BMX, even though they never saw anyting other than paved roads. For a period the ideal was the racer, and there are the trekking bike as sort of compromise between the racer and the roadster. The vintage trend is quite noticeable. I'm not sure what's the coolest these days, but a lot of nice bikes to choose from.

If you plan to use a bit of money on the bike it's worth looking at different types of bikes, trying some out if you have the chance. If you ride every day to and from work, mudguards can be a must! I have never had a bike used most days of the week most weeks of the year last as long as you have, at least with rim brakes and derailleur gears. After a couple of years rims, cassette and chain has needed replacement, and it has hardly seemed worth the expence and effort. Except for my racer I wasn't that fond of either them to fix them up.

My preferances these days lean towards fairly slim tires, drum brakes, 28" wheels, internal geared hubs, a nice frame steel, aluminum or titanium. I so focus on and easy ride, durable parts and dependable performace, but I understand very well the different priorities and different choises. It's really nice to fix up an old bike and get it exactly what you are looking for :- )
Mickey2 is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 06:56 AM
  #24  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
I'm amased at how long your rims have lasted, not to mention tires and brake blocks.
This has always freaked me out a bit given the miles & me riding sometimes in the light snow. I quit riding in snow last year though when I switched to a thin tire. It cost me a couple cracked ribs to learn and I never knew how painful that is.

The front rim is extremely true and the rear just a tad off, but not ride noticeable. Most folks wouldn't realize how cool it is my bike is original except for other bike folks.

Thanks for all the tips & thoughts.
Retiredguns is offline  
Old 06-09-15, 07:36 AM
  #25  
Retiredguns
Member
Thread Starter
 
Retiredguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
If you like the bike, fix it up and keep on using it. You can replace the chain and cassette on your ol' Bianchi for A LOT less than $150. Heck, you could probably do it for under $50, even if you need to buy the tools for the job as well.

For the gears on the rear wheel, I don't know if your '93 Bianchi Ibex has a cassette or freewheel. They're both inexpensive, but only one will fit. There's a page on Sheldon Brown's site that illustrates the differences between the two so you can figure out which you have:
Freewheel or Cassette?

If you need a cassette, a Shimano HG41 costs $12.76 from Niagara Cycle:
Shimano Acera HG41 7 Speed 11-28t Cassette

If you need a freewheel, a Shimano TZ-21 will set you back $9.99:
Shimano TZ-21 Tourney 7-Speed Freewheel - 14-28T

A KMC Z51 chain would work with either, and that would set you back a whopping $6.77:
KMC Z51 Chain 6/7/8 Speed 1/2" x 3/32" Brown

So you're up to about $20 total, plus maybe another $20 if you need a cassette/freewheel tool and chain tool.



I have no doubt that your chain and cogs are worn and probably need replacing. Your bike would have to be a LOT older for replacement parts to be unavailable, though.
Thanks for the tips & info. Can or is there a reason to change the cassette/chain config? Mine has a 13-30 and according to records is probably this as it looks the same:
Shimano CS-HG50 Freehub Cassette - 13-30T, 7-Speed, Silver



and the chain a Shimano CN-HG50 Chain 6/7/8 Speed

These components are considerably more expensive at $30 for the cassette and $24 for the chain.
Retiredguns is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.