Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

starting to lose stamina and general fitness

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

starting to lose stamina and general fitness

Old 07-05-15, 07:38 PM
  #1  
ParkingTheBus
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 141

Bikes: Multiple GIANT bicycles

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
starting to lose stamina and general fitness

I'm not sure if I should be worried or if I'm just overthinking. I'm only 22 so I'm pretty young. I commute about 15 km to work 5 days a week, and go for a few extra rides a week or on my spin bike when it's raining. On average with commuting and mountain biking, I probably average 120-180 km a week. It isn't much, I know, but I also work a pretty physical job which impacts my rides.

I completed my first century on my hybrid bike 10 days ago and since then, I've felt extremely fatigued and tired. I'm not riding as fast, my legs burn and I have slightly aching hamstrings. Could I be overtraining? My fitness and technical skills aren't as advanced as others, but I usually would be zooming to work at 30 km/hr and riding on mountain bike trails with ease... Should I just take a week off? Thanks.

Edit: I forgot to mention, I average 5-6 hours of sleep a night which could be a factor.

Last edited by ParkingTheBus; 07-05-15 at 08:03 PM.
ParkingTheBus is offline  
Old 07-05-15, 07:42 PM
  #2  
TakingMyTime
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Posts: 2,021

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX, 5200 & 7700

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 757 Post(s)
Liked 508 Times in 315 Posts
Take a couple of days off, do some stretching. Get a few good meals in you. If you still feel the same possibly see a doctor.
TakingMyTime is offline  
Old 07-05-15, 10:16 PM
  #3  
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 616
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Take a week or two mostly off, it's okay to do some easy riding every other day or so, and sleep more until you start feeling better then ease back into your normal schedule.

Once you do get back to commuting and all the other riding you do I'd suggest taking it a little easier on your commutes. 30 kph pace on a hybrid is pretty quick for most people on a hybrid, and averaging that on your half hour commute means you're going hard right from the get go. Doing that day in and day out would likely have worn you out over time without doing the century.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 01:56 AM
  #4  
mattleegee
Senior Member
 
mattleegee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Kent, WA
Posts: 107

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Roubaix Comp Di2

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
30kph on a hybrid?
I thought i was fast but now feel out of shape and slow

Listen to your body, maybe slow your pace slightly
mattleegee is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 03:33 AM
  #5  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 5,100

Bikes: Day6 Semi Recumbent "FIREBALL", 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 885 Post(s)
Liked 397 Times in 266 Posts
Burn out can happen at anytime no matter age or physical condition. Do as suggested and back off so the body rebuilds, make sure your diet is healthy and a doctor's visit for a good check-up/blood work-up is always a good place to start to check the engine's condition.

Originally Posted by mattleegee View Post
30kph on a hybrid?
I thought i was fast but now feel out of shape and slow

Listen to your body, maybe slow your pace slightly
Don't feel so bad, at 22 the 18mph average is a walk in the park.
OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 04:05 AM
  #6  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,023

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by ParkingTheBus View Post
Edit: I forgot to mention, I average 5-6 hours of sleep a night which could be a factor.
Certainly could be, if your body doesn't work optimally on 5-6 hours sleep.
I was a pro sportsman for 20 years (not cycling) and neede at least 10 hrs/night to be able to train and perform. Now I'm "retired" and 8 hrs does me fine.
On bicycles tours (fully loaded) I'll happily sleep 12 hrs after a hard day.

Listen to your body. Eat well, hydrate well, rest well, push yourself beyond your limits when you feel you can...

Stretching works well for me. Others find it superflous. Even meditation and "mental training" can affect your performance - much more than a lot of people imagine.

Ain't nothing wrong with feeling drained for a short period. If it stretches into multiple weeks I'd advise a medical check-up, blood tests and a session with a dietist.
imi is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 04:40 AM
  #7  
howeeee
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 964
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by ParkingTheBus View Post
I'm not sure if I should be worried or if I'm just overthinking. I'm only 22 so I'm pretty young. I commute about 15 km to work 5 days a week, and go for a few extra rides a week or on my spin bike when it's raining. On average with commuting and mountain biking, I probably average 120-180 km a week. It isn't much, I know, but I also work a pretty physical job which impacts my rides.

I completed my first century on my hybrid bike 10 days ago and since then, I've felt extremely fatigued and tired. I'm not riding as fast, my legs burn and I have slightly aching hamstrings. Could I be overtraining? My fitness and technical skills aren't as advanced as others, but I usually would be zooming to work at 30 km/hr and riding on mountain bike trails with ease... Should I just take a week off? Thanks.

Edit: I forgot to mention, I average 5-6 hours of sleep a night which could be a factor.

sounds like you are ready for the old folks home to me
howeeee is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 08:47 AM
  #8  
Up North
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: SW ONTARIO
Posts: 525

Bikes: P1 Domane Di2, SLR Emonda Di2, Trek Farley 9 Fatbike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Other than your ride to work have you done longer rides of 50-75-100 before? If not you probably overdid it and your body is telling you so. You need to build up to a big ride. Sounds to me like you beat yourself up. Rest and recovery should do it along with some regular stretching.
Up North is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 10:14 AM
  #9  
berner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 4,328

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 653 Post(s)
Liked 483 Times in 291 Posts
Lots of rest after a hard ride is really important which includes plenty of sleep also. Also proper eating to enable recovery is necessary. Recovery Tips | Bicycling
berner is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 11:43 AM
  #10  
jfowler85
Senior Member
 
jfowler85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zinj
Posts: 1,826

Bikes: '93 911 Turbo 3.6

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Does not sound abnormal, following a century. You are young - how much do you sleep do you get and what quality of sleep is it? Are you living off of microwave burritos and chips or do you normally eat a decent, varied diet? What is your occupation? Do you usually perform another exercise like running, swimming, climbing?
jfowler85 is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 11:47 AM
  #11  
obed7
Senior Member
 
obed7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Porter, Texas
Posts: 4,125

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.2, Ridley Xfire, Giant Propel, KHS AeroComp

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1648 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
at my age stamina loss is a given, but at least on a bicycle, nobody knows it but me.
obed7 is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 11:49 AM
  #12  
ParkingTheBus
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 141

Bikes: Multiple GIANT bicycles

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CharlyAlfaRomeo View Post
Take a week or two mostly off, it's okay to do some easy riding every other day or so, and sleep more until you start feeling better then ease back into your normal schedule.

Once you do get back to commuting and all the other riding you do I'd suggest taking it a little easier on your commutes. 30 kph pace on a hybrid is pretty quick for most people on a hybrid, and averaging that on your half hour commute means you're going hard right from the get go. Doing that day in and day out would likely have worn you out over time without doing the century.
Ill definitely take a week off, maybe just do light riding with friends. It's pretty quick but I can't resist. Going slow makes me feel old xD

Originally Posted by mattleegee View Post
30kph on a hybrid?
I thought i was fast but now feel out of shape and slow

Listen to your body, maybe slow your pace slightly
Thx, dont feel bad lol

Originally Posted by OldTryGuy View Post
Burn out can happen at anytime no matter age or physical condition. Do as suggested and back off so the body rebuilds, make sure your diet is healthy and a doctor's visit for a good check-up/blood work-up is always a good place to start to check the engine's condition.



Don't feel so bad, at 22 the 18mph average is a walk in the park.
i eat healthy, at lleast I think i do. Lots of protein, good carbs abd fruits/vegetables

Originally Posted by imi View Post
Certainly could be, if your body doesn't work optimally on 5-6 hours sleep.
I was a pro sportsman for 20 years (not cycling) and neede at least 10 hrs/night to be able to train and perform. Now I'm "retired" and 8 hrs does me fine.
On bicycles tours (fully loaded) I'll happily sleep 12 hrs after a hard day.

Listen to your body. Eat well, hydrate well, rest well, push yourself beyond your limits when you feel you can...

Stretching works well for me. Others find it superflous. Even meditation and "mental training" can affect your performance - much more than a lot of people imagine.

Ain't nothing wrong with feeling drained for a short period. If it stretches into multiple weeks I'd advise a medical check-up, blood tests and a session with a dietist.
Yep, definitely will stretch like hell today
Originally Posted by Up North View Post
Other than your ride to work have you done longer rides of 50-75-100 before? If not you probably overdid it and your body is telling you so. You need to build up to a big ride. Sounds to me like you beat yourself up. Rest and recovery should do it along with some regular stretching.
Nope and I think thats the problem. Previously, my longedt ride was 80 km. 105 km on a hybrid is pretty strenuous I now realize. Definitely saving up more for a road bike next summer

I
ParkingTheBus is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 02:14 PM
  #13  
mozad655
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Try fasting (no food or water) for a full 20-24 hour and go on a 30-50km ride after that. It can be a bit tough (much easier than you think though). The next time you go on a ride you will feel like superman. I now it sounds weird, but it actually works and your body is strong enough so 20-24 hour fasting is no problem for it.
mozad655 is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 02:37 PM
  #14  
Doctor Morbius
Interocitor Command
 
Doctor Morbius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The adult video section
Posts: 3,378

Bikes: 3 Road Bikes, 2 Hybrids

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 596 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 38 Posts
Stretching is highly overrated and it will not aid in one's recovery one iota. Stretching is one of those old school myths that has no scientific basis.
Doctor Morbius is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 03:05 PM
  #15  
Catinella
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 95

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX (2015), Trek 1500 SLR (2005)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You are young. It was a long ride. Take a week off any hard riding. You will be fine.
Catinella is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 09:59 AM
  #16  
wrldtraveller
Senior Member
 
wrldtraveller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 114

Bikes: 1999 Raleigh 24 spd Mtn bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Parkthebus, I can relate, Im not young, approaching mid age, although Im in denial.
but I usually average 20 miles an hour on a minimum of 2 hour per ride. and usually I tend to end my ride with one blast of speed up to 30 miles an hour. when I do that, I tend to listen to my body, eat right, rest to allow my muscles to recover, then my muscles will thank me by giving me more energy for the next ride. So i can understand the feeling of pedalling slowly, and it feels slow. If you pedal today, then pedal tomorrow and you find out that you are slow, sluggish, lack stamina, that means your muscles are fatigued and need to rest. Its a tough pill to take but its important to listen to what your body is telling you. Eventually your body will get used to it then increase stamina for longer distance of riding.

Keep up riding, don't stop, its a lifestyle and passion, should always be part of life.

W
wrldtraveller is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 10:11 AM
  #17  
jfowler85
Senior Member
 
jfowler85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zinj
Posts: 1,826

Bikes: '93 911 Turbo 3.6

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius View Post
Stretching is highly overrated and it will not aid in one's recovery one iota. Stretching is one of those old school myths that has no scientific basis.
Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

Has a few citations stating that stretching is actually contraindicated for recovery.
jfowler85 is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 10:32 AM
  #18  
Doctor Morbius
Interocitor Command
 
Doctor Morbius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The adult video section
Posts: 3,378

Bikes: 3 Road Bikes, 2 Hybrids

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 596 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by jfowler85 View Post
Stretching After Exercise: Does it Aid in Recovery?

Has a few citations stating that stretching is actually contraindicated for recovery.
Yet 3 people recommended it as part of the OP's "recovery" process. That's the problem with laypeople offering advice. It's often wrong.
Doctor Morbius is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 10:37 AM
  #19  
RISKDR1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 510
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
your weekly mileage may be marginal for riding centuries. You need to recover for now. In general I would say you are under trained for that distance but your work and lack of sleep would probably make it difficult to train with enough distance to be fit for riding a century.
RISKDR1 is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 10:58 AM
  #20  
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,695

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter, Volae Team, Priority Eight, Nimbus MUni, Trek Roscoe 6.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 772 Times in 400 Posts
What are your goals? Your goals may be performance related, pleasure related, experience related, political, health related, financially driven, or some combination. What you should do, to a large degree, depends on your goals.

If goals are more performance related, that favors intense workouts and serious rest. Not what most people consider fun, and not necessarily consistent with regular commuting. OTOH, if you goal is to commute while maximizing performance on weekend events, you can moderate your commute effort to create near-rest days. In either case, more sleep is a positive, but that may be too much of a lifestyle sacrifice. Again, it depends on your goals, and from there how much you are willing to sacrifice and work to achieve those goals.
downtube42 is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 02:56 PM
  #21  
ParkingTheBus
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 141

Bikes: Multiple GIANT bicycles

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RISKDR1 View Post
your weekly mileage may be marginal for riding centuries. You need to recover for now. In general I would say you are under trained for that distance but your work and lack of sleep would probably make it difficult to train with enough distance to be fit for riding a century.
Yea, thats the problem. My work is physical and I do ky bigger rides only maybe twice a week. The century was pretty random as well. I was 60 km and just told myself that I may as well complete 100 km. I took a major detour home haha.

Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
What are your goals? Your goals may be performance related, pleasure related, experience related, political, health related, financially driven, or some combination. What you should do, to a large degree, depends on your goals.

If goals are more performance related, that favors intense workouts and serious rest. Not what most people consider fun, and not necessarily consistent with regular commuting. OTOH, if you goal is to commute while maximizing performance on weekend events, you can moderate your commute effort to create near-rest days. In either case, more sleep is a positive, but that may be too much of a lifestyle sacrifice. Again, it depends on your goals, and from there how much you are willing to sacrifice and work to achieve those goals.

It's mostly recreational. I want to be faster and gain more endurance to keep up with a couple other friends, but nothing to serious. Better cyclists motivate me to get better, but I won't beat myself up for being slower.

That's a good idea however. On my commute, I'll take it easy and maximize my efforts on actual rides.
ParkingTheBus is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 04:58 PM
  #22  
Ray9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: New England
Posts: 287

Bikes: Cannondale six-13

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 15 Posts
Given the relatively moderate mileage you were used to a century was probably a shock to your body. It's not a good idea to just jump into a century without training for it. It's going to take a good month for you to recover. Next time prepare yourself and build up to it.
Ray9 is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 05:36 PM
  #23  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,023

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 38 Posts
starting to lose stamina and general fitness

Many people confuse scientific studies of the performance of top pro professional athletes whose goal is to win an olympic medal or the Tour de France with their own amateur exercise routine. Not belittling at all, but there is a world of difference, and to just, for example, refer to the latest research on stretching as to how it affects peak pro performance compared to it's role in a healthy regular training program is well, to be blunt, just silly...

If stretching had only negative effects (which studies have shown it can in certain aspects of peak performance), then no professional athlete would still stretch at all, neh? It's not as if they're not aware of the ongoing discussion and research is it? But hey, surprise, surprise, many still do because they experience benefits to their recovery and performance... Others don't...

Anyone who trains at an elite level is extremely aware of their body's needs.
Fwiw, I've been there, and stretching was an integral part of my well being. Others I know find it a waste of time at best, or even to have a negative effect on their training and performance.

This may actually seem surprising as all our physiologies sre basically the same.
There is, however, a much wider scope of psychological differences between individuals. The "mental training" while stretching before or after physical performance may well have a greater effect on the result and recovery than strict lab tests have been able to show...

It ain't just "stretching is good m'ok" or "stretching is bad m'ok"

Last edited by imi; 07-07-15 at 05:53 PM.
imi is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 07:48 PM
  #24  
Doctor Morbius
Interocitor Command
 
Doctor Morbius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The adult video section
Posts: 3,378

Bikes: 3 Road Bikes, 2 Hybrids

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 596 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by imi View Post
Many people confuse scientific studies of the performance of top pro professional athletes whose goal is to win an olympic medal or the Tour de France with their own amateur exercise routine. Not belittling at all, but there is a world of difference, and to just, for example, refer to the latest research on stretching as to how it affects peak pro performance compared to it's role in a healthy regular training program is well, to be blunt, just silly...

If stretching had only negative effects (which studies have shown it can in certain aspects of peak performance), then no professional athlete would still stretch at all, neh? It's not as if they're not aware of the ongoing discussion and research is it? But hey, surprise, surprise, many still do because they experience benefits to their recovery and performance... Others don't...

Anyone who trains at an elite level is extremely aware of their body's needs.
Fwiw, I've been there, and stretching was an integral part of my well being. Others I know find it a waste of time at best, or even to have a negative effect on their training and performance.

This may actually seem surprising as all our physiologies sre basically the same.
There is, however, a much wider scope of psychological differences between individuals. The "mental training" while stretching before or after physical performance may well have a greater effect on the result and recovery than strict lab tests have been able to show...

It ain't just "stretching is good m'ok" or "stretching is bad m'ok"
What you are doing is confusing beliefs with facts. That's OK and it's not at all uncommon, but it doesn't make it right.

Are you saying that your physiology is different from other people? That stretching benefits you but may not benefit or may even be detrimental to others? I'd say that's a barge load of hooey.

As long as a person is flexible enough to perform their event, whether it's cycling, running or kung fu, that's all the more flexible they need to be. Stretching does nothing to aid in one's recovery. Active rest? Yes. Adequate sleep? Yes. Sound nutrition? Yes. Stretching? Sorry, but no.
Doctor Morbius is offline  
Old 07-08-15, 01:15 AM
  #25  
imi
aka Timi
 
imi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 3,023

Bikes: Bianchi Lupo (touring) Bianchi Volpe (commuter), Miyata On Off Road Runner

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius View Post
Are you saying that your physiology is different from other people? That stretching benefits you but may not benefit or may even be detrimental to others?
Uh no, bit of misunderstanding here... I actually said "...all our physiologies sre basically the same. ..." but I am suggesting that for some people stretching after exercise, has a beneficial effect, possibly similar to that which meditative Yoga can have on the bodiy's physical status.

My stretching routine combined muscle extension, forced relaxation (CAT), diaphragmal deep breathing, contemplation and meditation. I am willing to accept that just the extension of muscles (stretching) may have had no positive effect, but the combined overall time I spent stretching was beneficial...
Cut the stretching out of the equation, then possibly time spent with mental training, breathing exercises and meditation would be just as beneficial. However, personally had I cut out the stretching, I would have often skipped those parts... miles vary I imagine

Sports science is not a closed book. It would not surprise me if many things we believe today (including everything you and I have written here) will be shown to be incorrect... That's just the way science works.

I'll do some reading as it has been 10 years since my professional career came to an end, and this is an interesting subject.

I will however continue to stretch because it makes me feel good!

Last edited by imi; 07-08-15 at 01:42 AM.
imi is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.