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Shimano Tourney RD. It's not that bad!

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Shimano Tourney RD. It's not that bad!

Old 10-01-15, 01:29 PM
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DBrown9383
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Shimano Tourney RD. It's not that bad!

I have an inexpensive Schwinn with trigger shifters and tourney RD. I have learned through trial and error how to tune the RD to what I consider to be perfection. I keep it clean and lubed as well as the chain and chain rings. I know tourney is the bottom of the shimano line but I can't imagine how shifting could get any better. My shifts are effortless and silent. It never misses a shift; it shifts quickly and precisely every time. How are the more pricey shimano RD's better besides weight? I have over 1,000mi. on the tourney and there's no sign of wear. If I ever do wear it out, they are very inexpensive to replace.. Why pay more?
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Old 10-01-15, 01:44 PM
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I used Tourney brifters on a recent Centurion Super Elite upgrade for my daughter's friend. I did go with Tiagra derailleurs, but the overall combination worked pretty nicely. Sweet bike.
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Old 10-01-15, 03:00 PM
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The RD of a bike is actually fairly tolerant, especially with 7 speeds. It's designed to begin with to tolerate freewheel wobble. It has two big springs, for the paralleogram and for the tensioner, which both take up the slack, wherever it comes from. The upper pulley is close to the cage pivot so it doesn't get too far out of whack as the B axle wears, and the chain is designed to ride somewhat cross-chained anyhow just so it can be shifted. So as long as it isn't outright broken, you can keep adjusting out the wear until it's amazingly far out of alignment.

The Tourney RD's have unpainted plastic knuckles and are otherwise made from painted or galvanized steel, making them a little more ugly, prone to wear as the spring tension stretches out the hinges, and less resistant to the environment. As you go up you get better materials and better finishes. At Deore level you get all-metal construction, at XT level you get all-aluminum construction and ball bearing pulleys.
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Old 10-01-15, 04:49 PM
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I agree 100%. I have a Tourney RD on my beater hybrid and it never misses. I too am impressed at the predictability and performance given the price point/level.

Jeff
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Old 10-01-15, 04:56 PM
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Never had the tourney's but did have the altus derailler which is only one step up and yes they were fine. I did notice a slight 'delay' between the shift and the actual chain movement that I don't have with the slx's i currently use, but this was so minor that it never concerned me
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Old 10-01-15, 06:09 PM
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Shimano rear shifting, properly adjusted, is perfect all the way up and down the line. 7,8,9, 10 and 11 speed.

However, lower end shimano front derailleurs can be rather slow and noisy during shifts.

It's interesting to read press reviews, though. As in, "don't bother with dura ace, since ultegra 6800 is identical in function." Then, "don't bother with ultegra 6800 since 5800 is identical in function." Then, "the new tiagra is identical to 5800 aside from having one less gear."

And as far as a delay in shifting is concerned, I just read a review of sram's electronic road group, and the reviewer notes that the shifting is significantly slower than he expected and wanted. So, this can be an issue even with the most expensive component groups.
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Old 10-01-15, 06:52 PM
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Have a Tourney RD on a Townie, with a few hundred km of mostly dirt or sandy road. Have to say it shifts well, perhaps a little slower than higher level components. Somehow, it just keeps on working?

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Old 10-01-15, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by calimtb View Post
However, lower end shimano front derailleurs can be rather slow and noisy during shifts.
I know you've done a lot of reading since you began working on bikes a month or so ago, but in my experience, this is not accurate. I had occasion to use a Sora fd, it was what I could find with the clamp size I needed. In operation, I found it to be indistinguishable from the 7800 and 7900 fds I have on other bikes. Just anecdotal of course, but based on actual experience.
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Old 10-01-15, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by DBrown9383 View Post
I have an inexpensive Schwinn with trigger shifters and tourney RD. I have learned through trial and error how to tune the RD to what I consider to be perfection. I keep it clean and lubed as well as the chain and chain rings. I know tourney is the bottom of the shimano line but I can't imagine how shifting could get any better. My shifts are effortless and silent. It never misses a shift; it shifts quickly and precisely every time. How are the more pricey shimano RD's better besides weight? I have over 1,000mi. on the tourney and there's no sign of wear. If I ever do wear it out, they are very inexpensive to replace.. Why pay more?
We live in pretty good times as far as bikes and components are concerned. Even bottom-level components like your Tourney RD benefit from decades of innovations like slant parallelograms and sprung upper and lower pivots with tension adjustment.
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Old 10-01-15, 09:38 PM
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Agreed. Not only that but a replacement tourney RD is $14 on Amazon...Amazing!
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Old 10-02-15, 03:38 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
I know you've done a lot of reading since you began working on bikes a month or so ago, but in my experience, this is not accurate. I had occasion to use a Sora fd, it was what I could find with the clamp size I needed. In operation, I found it to be indistinguishable from the 7800 and 7900 fds I have on other bikes. Just anecdotal of course, but based on actual experience.
That's awesome performance then.

I was referring more to mtb triple crank front derailleurs though. There, higher end fd's are a lot smoother.

In test riding road bikes, I focused my assessment more on rear shifting, and almost all of the bikes I rode had tiagra, 105 or ultegra. I have test ridden sora and claris over the years, but again, focused more so on rear shifting. I guess I figured if the front shifted, that was good enough. I guess I just felt that 8 or 9 speed cassettes just weren't "sufficient" with 10 and 11 speed cassettes available. I wasn't especially pleased with gear spacing on 8/9 speeds, either, so didn't test ride many bikes with those groups.

I haven't test ridden dura ace yet. But reviews tend to suggest dura ace and ultegra shifting are basically identical/indistinguishable.

btw, I've been performing basic bike maintenance for 25 years, but have been blessed with bikes that stay in adjustment after an initial tuneup.

That's the curse of shimano: they're so reliable, there's no need to adjust the components after initial break in and you don't get a chance to work on your mech skills.

Campy OTOH....
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Old 10-02-15, 03:41 AM
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I'm having a mixed bag experience with Tourney. On one bike it shifts very well, with very little tweaking to keep it in tune. My hybrid is a different story. I'm constantly having to fiddle with it to get it to shift correctly in back.
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Old 10-02-15, 03:57 AM
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Originally Posted by lost_in_endicot View Post
I'm having a mixed bag experience with Tourney. On one bike it shifts very well, with very little tweaking to keep it in tune. My hybrid is a different story. I'm constantly having to fiddle with it to get it to shift correctly in back.
It could be anything. There could be a problem with the chain, or with the cassette, or a problem with the hanger, the cables, the housing, the shifters, or two or more of the above.

With the derailleur itself, problems can emerge if either or both pulleys are a problem, or if the pivot points aren't lubed.

A lot of times, a simple tri flow job (oil and wipe the chain, a small dab at pivot points and pulleys), along with cleaning the cassette can clear things up to near perfection.

Of course, check out your limit screws and make sure you've taken up any cable slack.
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