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New to forum looking for a good "big guy" bike

Old 10-19-15, 08:18 AM
  #1  
revdrj76
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New to forum looking for a good "big guy" bike

Hey all, new to the forum here, had some questions. I'm a big guy, 6ft 1 280 highland games and strength athlete, looking to start riding for cardio and endurance and to trip some of the unwanted fat and ride with the wife. I'm looking for a decent big guy bike, budget $800-$1200 probably a hybrid really not sure what type of riding we will be doing as we are looking of moving soon. was looking at kona bikes Jake and Jake 24 KONA BIKES | 2016 BIKES | JAKE | Jake KONA BIKES | 2016 BIKES | KIDS' | Jake 24 just not sure any advice would be greatly appreciated. Have a wonderful day
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Old 10-19-15, 08:47 AM
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New to forum looking for a good "big guy" bike

Hi, you might get better advice in the Clydsdale forum...
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Old 10-19-15, 09:52 AM
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I know some bike have a 220lb weight limit. I would go to a good bike shop have a talk with a sale rep to get some ideas of what is available. There are lots of used bikes around from the 90's with chromoly (toughened up carbon steel) frames which would possibly be a good choice even if you had to spend a few bucks getting it tuned up or retrofitted. These bike were so well made, that in most cases they would last several lifetimes imho.
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Old 10-19-15, 11:01 AM
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At your weight, I would suspect any bike shop quality hybrid will work for you... Although I would stay at the low end of yourt budget since most bikes as they get more expensive, give you lighter weight, and I trust nice "heavy" parts to be more reliable for us big riders.

I ride a Trek 7.3 FX I bought used, and rode a Giant Sedona DX for about 10 years. Both have been trouble free for my riding which is mostly gravel rail trails and some rough paved roads. I have not weighed below 300 pounds on either of these bikes.
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Old 10-19-15, 11:44 AM
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I was going to suggest a cyclocross-style bike - that's what I'm riding, and it works well for my weight. It also is a style that allows for a lot of different terrain - a great all-around design. The Kona Jake in the 57cm size would definitely be one I would look at (not the 24 - that's a kids' bike). You also might look at the Diamondback Haanjo or the Cannondale CAADX series. These are all aluminum frame bikes with carbon forks. You might also find a few CX bikes with steel frames that would also work nicely. I'm pretty much sold on the cyclocross design because it is more rugged than a typical road bike, and the geometry sits a wee bit more upright. Have fun looking!
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Old 10-19-15, 01:02 PM
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I'm 6'-1" 205 previously about 230. Been riding vintage steel bikes from the 80's. Hybrid or Fitness style. If I were you I'd watch out for the new light - weight low spoke count nonsense the LBS are pushing. Go find a nice older steel bike like an 80's Schwinn Voyager & put some new tires on it. You'll be much better off IMHO. Some of the toughest bikes ever made were produced in the 80's by Fuji, Univega, Centurion, Schwinn, & others. That's why so many of them are still out there. Be good. Have fun.
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Old 10-19-15, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by revdrj76 View Post
Hey all, new to the forum here, had some questions. I'm a big guy, 6ft 1 280 highland games and strength athlete, looking to start riding for cardio and endurance and to trip some of the unwanted fat and ride with the wife. I'm looking for a decent big guy bike, budget $800-$1200 probably a hybrid really not sure what type of riding we will be doing as we are looking of moving soon. was looking at kona bikes Jake and Jake 24 KONA BIKES | 2016 BIKES | JAKE | Jake KONA BIKES | 2016 BIKES | KIDS' | Jake 24 just not sure any advice would be greatly appreciated. Have a wonderful day
You don't NEED a hybrid bike. You're not a superclyde, so almost all bikes will handle your weight.

Now, what you will need to watch is your wheels. You'll need wheels with at least 28/32 spokes front/back.

My suggestion would be to go to several LBSs, and try hybrids, cross bikes, gravel bikes, and road bikes. See which one you like to ride the most. Before you buy, make sure you try several different brands in the right size (probably in road bikes, 58cm and above). Buy the one that fits the best in your budget, and makes you excited about riding.

GH
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Old 10-19-15, 02:53 PM
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If you are going new, Cyclocross, Touring, or serious commuting bikes are going to be your best bet. You want a nice sturdy chromoly steel, Aluminium, or Titanium frame & fork. I'd avoid any frame with a carbon fork, because I don't trust them. I'd avoid anything with less than 32 spokes on the wheels. And, I'd look for double walled rims and an absolute minimum of 28mm width tires.

I'd also budget to need to replace the stock pedals on anything you purchase that comes with pedals. It isn't uncommon for a Clyde to wear out stock pedals in a few hundred km.

Beyond that, it is about fit, style, comfort, utility, and buying something you'll actually ride.
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Old 10-19-15, 06:59 PM
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Good wheels are where it's at for you.
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Old 10-19-15, 07:17 PM
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You already looked at the Kona Jake, which would be a really good match for you if you want drop bars. That is a good strong bike, comfortable, and plenty fast. I think that Kona make basically the same bike with flat bars if you want to go that way. I would go with the Jake, but you need to decide what fits your style best.
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Old 10-19-15, 08:29 PM
  #11  
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6'2" down to 215 from 230.

I ride a Ti frame with a carbon fork CX bike and subject it to the abuse of fire roads, a few times a wrong turn onto some single track and haven't been able to break anything, (except for a chain once).

I wouldn't rule out a carbon fork, as long as it isn't a weight weenie bike. CX bike carbon forks are beefy and intended to be abused. CX bikes automatically take 32mm tires since that's the sport limit and usually have HD rims and 32 spoke setups. Some of them come with interrupters that make braking from the tops in an upright position a lot easier.

Drop bars give you a whole lot more posture options than flat bars and will future proof you somewhat as your body adapts and you can get lower and more aero. Drops with interrupters make it easy to ride relaxed on the tops with your head up and eyes on traffic or keep your weight back over the rear wheel when things get steep and loose.

the 34/48 setup on the Jake is close to perfect for all round gearing. Change out the cassette to a 12-34 and it would be.

Last edited by TGT1; 10-19-15 at 08:33 PM.
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Old 10-20-15, 01:09 PM
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+1 on wheels. I've heard some disturbing stories recently about low spoke count wheels. These spokes can suddenly fail causing wheels to lock up & riders to crash. Trek bikes have fallen for this marketing gimmick. Interestingly enough, bikes with stronger 32 & 36 spoke count wheels are usually less expensive too.
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Old 10-26-15, 01:43 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
Good wheels are where it's at for you.
+1. Any decent frame will work for you. I am 6'3", 275#, and I do not worry particularly about getting stuff specific for size. On the other hand, I do not do the "weight wienie" thing. I also do not do carbon fiber, mainly out of personal taste for bikes that look like what was hig-zoot when I started doing this 40 years ago, but also in part out of a completely unscientific fear that CF simply will not hold up in the elements as well as steel frames and alloy components. But that's just me.

Personally, all my wheels are 32 spoke except for one or two holdovers 36 spokers. Wheel components have improved to the point where 28 spokes would propably be okay for us, but I prefer not to that the chance. As for tires, I suggest going no thinner than 25mm. Also, at our size, you will want to run your tires at the high end of the recommended pressure range, regardless of the tire size, to cut down on pinch flats. I ride road bikes and run 25mm tires on them at 120psi. That pressure would be hard-as-nails bouncy hell for a 140 pound spindly legged climbing fart, but it works for me and should feel just fine to you on good surfaces. If you want to ride fire roads or elsewhere off the pavement, or do a mixture of both, get wider tires - at least 32mm, and probably wider.

Also +1 to trying out multiple bikes to get a sense of what feels good to you. Pretty much anything that is not designed for high-end time-trialing should hold up just fine under you.
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Old 10-26-15, 01:58 PM
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Kona Jake looks pretty good. Also in the Kona lineup in your price range are the Esatto, and Rove AL.
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Old 10-26-15, 04:37 PM
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