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New to sport need advice please

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New to sport need advice please

Old 10-19-15, 03:48 PM
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superkyle1721
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New to sport need advice please

Long time runner here looking to get into cycling. I've been searching my area for the "best bang for the buck" road bike that I can use for long weekend rides to keep in shape and take some stress off my knees a bit. I don't know that I will get into any races but I would like to keep that as a possibility as I generate more and more stamina and speed. I came across a 2008 Felt T25 that uses Ultegra and 105 components which in my research seem great. It is listed as a tri/road combo bike and there is very little info out there about them. I guess my question is as a new rider is this worth purchasing? I have set my limit to a used bike in the range of $600 or under. The bike is listed on local Craigslist for $650 is this a good deal or should i continue my search? As a taller rider (6'2) I have researched around and it seems 58cm is my correct size. It seems hard to find used bikes in this size. Any advice you guys have would be greatly appreciated BC i sure am lost in my search right now haha.
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Old 10-19-15, 04:00 PM
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Stratocaster
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I'm fairly certain that most here would recommend buying a bike that fits, rather than just buying a good bike at a good price.
Make sure the bike fits before you do anything.
Depending on the bike, a 58 might fit...but might not. Or it might fit, but not have the level of comfort you desire.

Last edited by Stratocaster; 10-19-15 at 04:04 PM.
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Old 10-19-15, 04:03 PM
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superkyle1721
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Originally Posted by Stratocaster View Post
I'm fairly certain that most here would recommend buying a bike that fits, rather than just buying a good bike at a good price.
Make sure the bike fits before you do anything.
I agree. I have been in talks with a local shop here that has sized me for a 58cm bike but with a caveat that each bike can be different. Both guys i spoke with have zero experience with the T25 so unfortunately I don't know how it would fit me. The bike is a 2 hour drive away which I don't mind making to purchase the bike but its a bit long to go size it...

If there was more information on the bike available on the web then im sure I could calculate it out compared to models that I know have been correctly sized for me but it seems like it is unavailable. Im guessing this is not a popular choice for many users but given the price point and components im not sure why.

Last edited by superkyle1721; 10-19-15 at 04:08 PM.
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Old 10-19-15, 05:23 PM
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58 is prolly your correct size. If/since you pre-like the bike, go check it out. But be prepared to walk away if it doesn't feel right/work for you.
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Old 10-20-15, 05:28 AM
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58 cm may be short in the top tube for you at 6'2". I'm 6' 3/4" with a longish torso, so ride a 58 cm with a 110mm stem. Depending on your proportions, you may need a 120mm stem on a 58 cm frame. If you have longer legs (proportionally), that frame might be fine. Bring your tape measure. Try any local shop to see the combination of effective top tube + stem reach that feels most natural to you. Those are the dimensions for which you're looking. Depending on the saddle to bar drop, this combination will change in the arc formed by the hinge of your waist as you bend.
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Old 10-21-15, 01:17 AM
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Hey Kyle,

if I may, please let me share my experience with you. Some years ago, I was struck out of nowhere to get into cycling. I knew literally nothing except that I wanted to ride a bike. On a suggestion from a friend, I looked into vintage steel bikes. (At this point, I'm sure many who are reading are rolling their eyes and thinking, "here goes one of those steel guys again!")

anyway, after looking and riding a few bikes fromCL, I found one in my size that didn't need much work to be road ready. Paid like $125 for my first one, an old concord road bike (cheap bike boom import), and proceeded to become immersed in all things cycling. The thing is, for me and many others, cycling is about much more than just riding. If you want a new bike and plan on taking it to the lbs for every little thing, then that is great. But imho, you would be missing out on so much the the sport has to offer.

by looking into old road bikes, one can learn so much about the history of bicycles, the engineering behind them, and also the joy of the simple mechanics of a bike. In a way, buying an old roadie forces you to become a more knowledgeable cyclist, and they are a whole lot more fun to ride. Down tube shifters, various drivetrain and breaking options, etc. when you buy new bikes, much of that fun is simply not there.

again, just my two cents worth. I think it's great when anybody wants to get into cycling, regardless of the type of equipment they choose to use. So above all else, follow the advice of the others and get a bike that fits you! Happy trails...
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