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Litespeed vs Peugeot

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Litespeed vs Peugeot

Old 01-11-16, 07:10 AM
  #1  
Mace350
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Litespeed vs Peugeot

I have 2 bikes, 1969 Peugeou PX10 and a 1997 Litespeed Catalyst. I would like to cut back to one bike. If you had to choose either one of these which would it be and why? I'm not a very experienced rider and I would like to simply have one bike. The lightspeed has a complete 2 x 10 rival group set on it and the Peugeot has a 2 x 10 105 group set on it. I don't think I have enough experience to simply pick one by "feel". Really just looking for pros and cons for each place from experienced riders. The Peugeot is being built now with the geared drivetrain so no current pics. I actually did a complete resto on it.

Pics are old

Peugeot as fixed gear...


Litespeed
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Old 01-11-16, 07:38 AM
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Strange!

I am of the generation that was in High School when the 67 Mustang came out and fell absolutely in love with the incomparable Mustang 68 BOSS... So much so that I drive a 2014 Mustang GT stick, the closest Ford ever came to my teen love.

At the same time the Peugeot racing (drop bar) bike was also an unrequited love.

My gut reaction when I saw your post is that 'I'd love to have the Peugeot' but if I were in your shoes I'd go with the Litespeed. Just gut reaction!...
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Old 01-11-16, 07:43 AM
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My brain says go with the litespeed; my heart with the PX 10, . I'd keep the Peugeot if I had to choose but it's a close call.


The PX 10 is a little harder to source parts for but on balance I'd keep that over the Litespeed because it can take a fatter tire. You'll need to measure the reach but I'm fairly certain that the reach is longer on the peugeot than the litespeed. And a little fatter tire will make the bike more versatile and more comfortable. I'll bet you can run at least a 28c on the peugeot and maybe a 32c as well; with most bikes with short reach brakes like the litespeed you top out at 25c. Tires play a huge role in the versatility of a bike.

Now if the peugeot had been my size, I would have told you to sell it,
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Old 01-11-16, 08:26 AM
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For me it would be a no brainer for the Lightspeed for many reasons, including that it's already built up.

BUT

based on the stem height, which seems to be too high (not inside fork enough), Isuspect that the Lightspeed may be a bit small for you and might say go with the Peugeot if it's an inch taller.

Either way, make sure your stem is at least 2-1/2 inches into your fork (below last thread based on a typical 2 inches of thread) to avoid damaging the fork.
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Old 01-11-16, 08:27 AM
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This is a no-brainer. I have a 2001 Litespeed so I know what good bikes they are. Peugeots are available everywhere. You have to keep the Litespeed. Like mine, yours is one of the Lynskey Litespeeds. Awesome bikes.
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Old 01-11-16, 08:53 AM
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I'd keep the Litespeed because there's no paint to scratch. Mine looks better after 19 years than my previous steel frame did with just 8 years of dings.

You should probably swap both for something else or keep the Peugot. While both look too small, the Lightspeed is small enough most stems are above their minimum insertion point when raised as high as yours needs to be. A Nitto Technomic would probably be OK, although if you need a bike that tall the top tube is probably too short.

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Old 01-11-16, 09:17 AM
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I'm 5'11" the Peugeot is 58cm and the Litespeed is 55cm. Pictures were not taken set up to ride they were taken during the building process and are deceiving. The stems are further down when I ride them but they are still quite high due to the fact that I'm not ready for a lower bar position yet. I will say the Peugeot is very comfortable but the lightspeed takes off like a rocket. That was the reasoning behind buying the 105 group for the Peugeot.
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Old 01-11-16, 01:26 PM
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At 5'11" you're size wise better off on a 58 frame. the Ti one is too small but should sell for more Money.

bike to replace both ? (I know you are getting the white one geared seems like you made up your mind )


Bike Friday Pocket Rocket will take up less space inside your house Too..
with 451 20" wheels, but all the drive train options you can dream of.

those wheels are lighter yet, and so it takes off like that Rocket..


a 2nd bike would be set up for more utility. ie carrying stuff .. racks, lights, mudguards ..
studded tires for the ice , etc. Different horse .

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Old 01-11-16, 02:21 PM
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6 of one, half a dozen of the other.

It all depends on your goals.

How old are you? I suppose it doesn't make a big difference, but if you're in your 60's or 70's, then you may end up choosing the larger frame. If you're in your 20's or 30's, you'll adapt to the smaller frame just fine, and can choose a stem size and seat position to fit your needs.

How interested are you in Classic/Vintage?

What are your intended riding goals? Hammering 7 day a week hard commutes, or a weekend warrior? Racing? Long group rides?

I've got a late 1960's era Colnago that has become absolutely battered from decades of day to day use, not that I regret using my favorite bike.
I've finally built up a Litespeed as my dedicated rain bike.

The two bikes are quite different, but I like them both. But, at this point, I've finally decided that if I'm going to continue doing 12 month riding, then I need to protect the old Colnago from the winter elements.

With that in mind, for a fair weather rider, either is fine. For hardcore winter riding, I'd lean towards the Litespeed.

I can't tell tire clearances from your photos. I'm strongly in the 23/25mm camp. I did try knobbies on my old Colnago once, and found some that barely fit. Your Litespeed probably maxes out around 28mm which is probably more than adequate for most uses, except gravel/off road, or mounting some kind of winter knobbies. The Pugeot probably has slightly more tolerance for larger tires, or even fenders if you would choose that route.

Again, it is all personal choice. Or you can sell both and buy your dream bike. Or, ride both for a while, then decide what you like or dislike about each, or both, and then buy your dream bike.
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Old 01-11-16, 03:11 PM
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My brain cannot compute your equation! Going from two to one just doesn't make any sense. N+1 it is always N+1 or at the very least N-1+1 which is what I am doing once I complete my new touring bike (I will get rid of the old one and be back to the original number and then strive for another new one)
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Old 01-11-16, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
My brain cannot compute your equation! Going from two to one just doesn't make any sense. N+1 it is always N+1 or at the very least N-1+1 which is what I am doing once I complete my new touring bike (I will get rid of the old one and be back to the original number and then strive for another new one)
I can't believe it took this long for someone to finally get there.
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Old 01-11-16, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
I can't believe it took this long for someone to finally get there.
Me too. I think people are just really bad at bike math around here but really want to help out.

Probably the only time I might say you have enough bikes is if you cannot maintain the bikes you have or you aren't riding the bikes (unless some of them are wall hangers or retired or something like that) or you buying those bikes will negatively effect others but those are all very rare cases.
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Old 01-11-16, 08:26 PM
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I've had one primary road bike for most of my life.

I now have a couple, and keep threatening to have a N-5 year.

Depending on a person's needs, there is no problem with having the one bike they like.
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Old 01-11-16, 08:54 PM
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I have thought about keeping both and I have thought about selling both and buying a new bike and having it professionally fit... I don't mind riding the Litespeed in any weather condition. The Peugeot has never even been caught out in the rain. I ride in the evenings after work, I'm 29 5'-11" and 214lbs I usually ride around 20-25 miles in the evenings during the week and maybe 40miles on the weekends. I have also thought about putting both up for sale and letting the one that sells first go. I bought the Peugeot as a rusted neglected frame after someone cut her up to be a SS. That gives the Peugeot a little more attachment to me.

Here it is when I bought it...
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...52653614376642
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Old 01-11-16, 09:45 PM
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The Litespeed should sell from $800 to $1200 if you have a little patience. Perhaps wait until about April to throw it up on Craigslist.

You don't have recent photos of the Peugeot. But, my guess you'll fight to sell it at $500.
Presumably it has had a good job with the repaint. However, you've apparently lost the derailleur hanger and fork. May have lost some cable stops, and it being a respray all diminish its value as a collector's bike. The 105 group set is a wash. Nice enough that it has some value to quite a few riders looking for a quality daily use bike, but not the vintage market.

It sounds like you enjoyed the Peugeot build, which is meaningful to you. But, also being non-original there may be less of a requirement to keep it pristine.

For the "younger generation", I'd probably keep the Litespeed. You can probably adapt to the frame size, and it should endure the years, but there are many reasons why it would be better to ride the Peugeot, and get the money back out of the Litespeed.
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Old 01-11-16, 10:02 PM
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which one do find yourself riding the most?
That's the one I would keep
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Old 01-12-16, 11:35 AM
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They are both beautiful bikes.

I would recommend selling them both. If you can get $1500-$1700 for the pair, you could buy a modern bike with modern components, perfectly fitted to you, probably with an aluminum frame and a carbon fork so it will be fine in all kinds of weather, and will still be a very comfortable ride.

You have two decent bikes there, but probably the Litespeed (which I would like) is a little small for you, and the Peugeot is a little beat up. Also, if you are only going to have one bike, I'd suggest one with gears, because you will be able to ride it comfortably in a greater variety of situations. A Fixie/SS is fine unless you just don't feel like struggling up a hill one day, or want to haul groceries or something.

Unless you really enjoy bike repair, upgrading, and maintenance, I'd suggest a new bike which could be a ride-and-wash-and ignore ride versus one of these older bikes. You might want to keep that Brooks saddle though.
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Old 01-12-16, 08:16 PM
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I'm still totally confused by this thread. I just can't get my mind around making a choice.

If you look close you'll see both a Peugeot and a Ti bike in there. How can one ever choose to keep just one?

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Old 01-12-16, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
They are both beautiful bikes.

I would recommend selling them both. If you can get $1500-$1700 for the pair, you could buy a modern bike with modern components, perfectly fitted to you, probably with an aluminum frame and a carbon fork so it will be fine in all kinds of weather, and will still be a very comfortable ride.

You have two decent bikes there, but probably the Litespeed (which I would like) is a little small for you, and the Peugeot is a little beat up. Also, if you are only going to have one bike, I'd suggest one with gears, because you will be able to ride it comfortably in a greater variety of situations. A Fixie/SS is fine unless you just don't feel like struggling up a hill one day, or want to haul groceries or something.

Unless you really enjoy bike repair, upgrading, and maintenance, I'd suggest a new bike which could be a ride-and-wash-and ignore ride versus one of these older bikes. You might want to keep that Brooks saddle though.
If I understand the post, the Peugeot originally was configured as a fixie, but it now has (or soon will have) a 2x10 105 group on it.

You can tinker a bit on older bikes, bit I'd consider it all modern enough that I wouldn't worry about it.

Nonetheless, selling the Litespeed, or both, would generate a good down payment on a very nice bike.
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Old 01-12-16, 09:04 PM
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The OP asked a simple question. What should he do, a or b. About a third of the respondents answered c despite most agreeing that both a and b work.

I liked that one poster pointed out the difference in max tire sized as a reason to keep one of the bikes. Now that's a good thought.

I would put the fit of each bike as number one. Then what is the bike going to do? Tire clearance might be the deciding factor once the use is established. Or weight and stiffness if the bike is to be ridden in fast company. For long days in the saddle, the PX-10 might be a good call with its more spread out geometry.

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Old 01-12-16, 09:22 PM
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In all honesty unless there is a compelling reason to sell one or the other I would hold off and keep riding both. Give it a year or so for you to "develop" what you are a cyclist and you may be in a better position then to decide what you really need or want from a bike. Then see if one meets that need or if you need to look elsewhere.

Even though I've always had some kind of bike around it was until injuries in 2010 forced me into cycling as a daily work out that I took it up with a purpose. Now 6 years and around 20,000 miles later I finally know what kind of riding I'm going to do and what I really want in a bike. Maybe, if you can, just give yourself time to mature as a cyclist and then you might be able to better figure out your needs for yourself. Just my 2 cents about this...
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Old 01-13-16, 06:57 AM
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Decisions decisions......... The Litespeed is small and the pug is not original.
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Old 01-13-16, 11:20 AM
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I set the litespeed up as the original builder intended(Colorado cyclist) according to them this is the exact size bike for me. My only problem with the Litespeed is I always feel as if I'm falling forward. That being said setting the bike up the way they implied is completely different from the way I've had it set up. I am going to set up both bikes in this manner and take the advice of keeping both and riding both to come to my decision. I think the main problem I have with the litespeed is it's more of a tri bike and The seat tube angle puts a lot of weight on my hands causing numbness. The Peugeot on the other hand feels way more balanced if that makes any sense. I think I'm better off doing this as some members pointed out it would probably be best to sell whichever bike I decide to sell in the spring time anyway. It's hard to let either bike go and who knows if I can make them both fit I probably will end up keeping both.
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Old 01-13-16, 11:22 AM
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Also remember I'm new at this so if anybody has advice for taking weight off your hands feel free to post it. As of now the only thing I can think of is the seat tube angle but I could be wrong.
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Old 01-13-16, 02:59 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Mace350 View Post
Also remember I'm new at this so if anybody has advice for taking weight off your hands feel free to post it. As of now the only thing I can think of is the seat tube angle but I could be wrong.
Do you ride the Litespeed with the seat tilted forward like that? If so, then of course there's more weight on your hands because they're working to push you back on the seat before you slide off.

The Brooks on your Pug has a much better seat angle. Some folks like a level seat with a Brooks (me) and some like it tilted up a little like you show.

Change the seat angle of the Litespeed and see how your hands feel. Maybe try the Brooks on that bike?
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