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Help me customize my Surly Long Haul Trucker

Old 03-18-16, 01:10 AM
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dim
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Help me customize my Surly Long Haul Trucker

I've been saving for one of these and have managed to buy one from a bike shop. I'm 5 foot 7 and have been looking at used ones, but could not find a 50cm one..... all the ones that I have seen advertised are 52-54cm frames.

I have given a deposit, and will pay the remaining balance next month when I collect it. I have to travel far to collect it, and have not seen it yet in person

I will be using this bike as my daily commuter (I average between 120-150 miles per week)

It's a 2013 model, brand new, and never been ridden. I got it at less than half price of the latest models.

Here are the specs:

Year: 2013

Frame Size: 50 cm

Mircoshift 9 speed bar end shifters.

Shimano LX 9 Speed Rear Mech.

Shimano Sora Triple Front Mech.

Shimano LX Front and Rear Hubs.

Tectro brake levers.

This bike has lugs on both the forks and threar of the bike in order for pannier racks to be fitted.

I will change the saddle to a black Brooks B17 standard (I would have loved the honey coloured saddle, but then I'd have to change the bar tape and brake hoods)

I'm not sure which tyres are fitted, but I will use whats on the bike, and the next set will be Schwalbe Marathon Supremes

I need fenders, racks, pannier bags etc and any advice will be greatly appreciated.





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Old 03-18-16, 01:25 AM
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Are you sure that's not too small? I'm 5'9" and I was easily riding a 56 cm frame LHT. My inseam is about 32 inches.

I had a top peak rear rack that worked well. I had these nice soma fab fenders in red, my frame was blue.

Get good lights and the best u lock you can't afford. Cygolight are good. An investment I feel is also worth it are locking skewers, and if you have a Brooks saddle locking seat post clamp.

Enjoy it, I think they are great and versatile bikes.
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Old 03-18-16, 01:32 AM
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Originally Posted by joeyduck View Post
Are you sure that's not too small? I'm 5'9" and I was easily riding a 56 cm frame LHT. My inseam is about 32 inches.

I had a top peak rear rack that worked well. I had these nice soma fab fenders in red, my frame was blue.

Get good lights and the best u lock you can't afford. Cygolight are good. An investment I feel is also worth it are locking skewers, and if you have a Brooks saddle locking seat post clamp.

Enjoy it, I think they are great and versatile bikes.
Thanks .... 50cm is my size. I have a Koga Miyata which is 52cm and my current commuter road bike is a 50cm and fits perfect ... I also owned a road bike that was 54cm, but it was a little big (I have short legs)

I'm more comfortable on a 50cm. I will check the clamps ec that you have mentioned
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Old 03-18-16, 05:33 AM
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Why do you need racks (plural) for commuting?
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Old 03-18-16, 08:21 AM
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i have SKS mudguards on several bikes bought quality steel tube racks Tubus recommended.

you can add a kickstand that fits across the left rear , by the axle , for convenience.. Surly fails to add a Kickstand mount by the BB.(demerit)

I use my tour ready bike often and the Ortlieb panniers go into the grocery store empty & come out full.


the chainset was installed as the company bought them , now you can have the shop take the 30t off and put a smaller one on to lower the low.

I like 'granny gears' with 1/2 the tooth count of the big ones 24/50 or 48, 26/52 ... 10 t between the 2 big rings..

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-18-16 at 08:28 AM.
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Old 03-18-16, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Why do you need racks (plural) for commuting?

Maybe he was like me. Some days I had the child carrier on the seat tube and needed the front pannier rack. Some days I didn't the the little man and put the panniers on the back.

BTW @dim I use PinHead locking skewers, I liked them since they looked sturdy, they could be ordered keyed the same, so my wife's bike has the same locking skewers that I had. No key confusion, we could grab any keys and they had bike, house, and skewer keys on them.
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Old 03-18-16, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Why do you need racks (plural) for commuting?
just need one rack .... I carry lots of gear to work plus 2 D-Locks in my backpack. I also do the daily shopping at the grocery store after work
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Old 03-18-16, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
i have SKS mudguards on several bikes bought quality steel tube racks Tubus recommended.

you can add a kickstand that fits across the left rear , by the axle , for convenience.. Surly fails to add a Kickstand mount by the BB.(demerit)

I use my tour ready bike often and the Ortlieb panniers go into the grocery store empty & come out full.


the chainset was installed as the company bought them , now you can have the shop take the 30t off and put a smaller one on to lower the low.

I like 'granny gears' with 1/2 the tooth count of the big ones 24/50 or 48, 26/52 ... 10 t between the 2 big rings..
thanks! good info.... I will have a very close look at this. I have 2 pannier bags that I bought off ebay a few months ago .... They are Carradice pannier bags for the rear rack.
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Old 03-18-16, 01:31 PM
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Carradice canvas are good too , They Buy Mounting hardware from Klick Fix , Another German supplier , its good too.
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Old 03-18-16, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
just need one rack .... I carry lots of gear to work plus 2 D-Locks in my backpack. I also do the daily shopping at the grocery store after work
For heavy duty, you can't go wrong with a Tubus Cargo rear rack. The folks at thetouringstore.com will sell you one and give you great service after the sale. They also carry Ortlieb and Axiom panniers, although they might be more than you need.

If $ is no obstacle, the Nitto Big rear rack sold through Rivendell is very strong, and it looks great on a black LHT. I would know. I have both.
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Old 03-18-16, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
For heavy duty, you can't go wrong with a Tubus Cargo rear rack. The folks at thetouringstore.com will sell you one and give you great service after the sale. They also carry Ortlieb and Axiom panniers, although they might be more than you need.

If $ is no obstacle, the Nitto Big rear rack sold through Rivendell is very strong, and it looks great on a black LHT. I would know. I have both.
thanks .... I will have a close look at Nitto rack .... I don't mind spending a bit on this bike and will want to keep it for a long time. My Carradice bags are blue, and they may look odd on the black bike

I'm seriously thinking about getting the honey brown Brooks B17 saddle and then changing the bar tape and brake hoods to brown. My son says I should keep the whole bike black including fenders, pannier bags, rack etc etc
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Old 03-18-16, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by joeyduck View Post
Are you sure that's not too small? I'm 5'9" and I was easily riding a 56 cm frame LHT. My inseam is about 32 inches.

I had a top peak rear rack that worked well. I had these nice soma fab fenders in red, my frame was blue.

Get good lights and the best u lock you can't afford. Cygolight are good. An investment I feel is also worth it are locking skewers, and if you have a Brooks saddle locking seat post clamp.

Enjoy it, I think they are great and versatile bikes.

Surly's are traditionally LONG. It's not usually suggested to go UP a size with a Surly. I ride 56s normally but bought a 54 because it more closely matched the geometry (and tube lengths.) of my 56s. Even though I bought a 54, the bike is still LARGE. I don't think I could ride a 56 if I wanted to. It is really close to my 58cm "comfort geometry" felt Z85
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Old 03-18-16, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Surly's are traditionally LONG. It's not usually suggested to go UP a size with a Surly. I ride 56s normally but bought a 54 because it more closely matched the geometry (and tube lengths.) of my 56s. Even though I bought a 54, the bike is still LARGE. I don't think I could ride a 56 if I wanted to. It is really close to my 58cm "comfort geometry" felt Z85
i read an article about the Surly Long Haul trucker bikes where it was mentioned that one should get one size smaller than what you normally ride:

Surly Long Haul Trucker - Touring Bicycle Review - Surly LHT


quote:

When it came to selecting the correct size, there were a few different schools of thought to consider. We took the advice of the bike shop to go for a smaller size than usual in a touring frame. The 60cm, and maybe even 62cm frame would certainly have fit me, but our man Barney at the local bike shop advised me to go for the 58cm in order to have
greater control over my steed when fully loaded, especially when getting on and off. I do have a rather long seat post and a raised stem. I didn’t even need to cut the fork down. What matters is that I feel comfortable on the bike, and so I’m absolutely sure I made the right sizing and set-up choices. Even my partner took the size down from her normal size, 46cm, and she just loves riding her Surly Long Haul Trucker.
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Old 03-18-16, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
i read an article about the Surly Long Haul trucker bikes where it was mentioned that one should get one size smaller than what you normally ride:

Surly Long Haul Trucker - Touring Bicycle Review - Surly LHT


quote:

When it came to selecting the correct size, there were a few different schools of thought to consider. We took the advice of the bike shop to go for a smaller size than usual in a touring frame. The 60cm, and maybe even 62cm frame would certainly have fit me, but our man Barney at the local bike shop advised me to go for the 58cm in order to have
greater control over my steed when fully loaded, especially when getting on and off. I do have a rather long seat post and a raised stem. I didn’t even need to cut the fork down. What matters is that I feel comfortable on the bike, and so I’m absolutely sure I made the right sizing and set-up choices. Even my partner took the size down from her normal size, 46cm, and she just loves riding her Surly Long Haul Trucker.
I'd agree with the article. I'm certainly glad I bought the 54 and not the 56.
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Old 03-18-16, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I'd agree with the article. I'm certainly glad I bought the 54 and not the 56.
That is interesting, I had not heard that before, thanks for the info. I felt fine on my 56 cm and I had not handling issues. I think that it was comparable sizes to my other bikes, except my Rocky Mountain Turbo, which I think is 54 cm.
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Old 03-18-16, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I'd agree with the article. I'm certainly glad I bought the 54 and not the 56.
even on my road bike .... According to the Eddy bike fit calculator, I should have a 52cm ....,I was keen on a Bianchi, and contacted Bianchi with all my measurements.... they suggested a size 52 cm or 53cm...

I have ridden a few 52 cm's but my newest commuter is a 50cm ... I have a Koga Miyata in size 52 and it's good, but perhaps a 50cm would have been better for me

I am very comfortable on a 50cm, and am much faster/confident around corners and windey roads .... took 2 weeks to get used to the geometry, and I had to constantly tweak the saddle position (forwards and back) .... got a shorter stem, changed the saddle .... and now I'm flying and smashing my previous Strava records

once I get this Surly sorted, I will look at a good carbon bike for days when I want to go fast and better my previous Strava times, and I will look at a size 50

Last edited by dim; 03-18-16 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 03-19-16, 01:11 AM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Surly's are traditionally LONG. It's not usually suggested to go UP a size with a Surly. I ride 56s normally but bought a 54 because it more closely matched the geometry (and tube lengths.) of my 56s. Even though I bought a 54, the bike is still LARGE. I don't think I could ride a 56 if I wanted to. It is really close to my 58cm "comfort geometry" felt Z85
How tall are you?
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Old 03-19-16, 04:52 AM
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Congrats on the new purchase.

Others will undoubtedly disagree, but I've used those brakes on another Surly model and, in my opinion, they are not safe for commuting. I'm 153 lbs. and I could barely lock up the rear wheel, no matter how I fiddled with them. I would get a set of reasonably priced "V" brakes and appropriate levers before I put another dime or shilling or whatever into the bike.
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Old 03-19-16, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
Congrats on the new purchase.

Others will undoubtedly disagree, but I've used those brakes on another Surly model and, in my opinion, they are not safe for commuting. I'm 153 lbs. and I could barely lock up the rear wheel, no matter how I fiddled with them. I would get a set of reasonably priced "V" brakes and appropriate levers before I put another dime or shilling or whatever into the bike.
thanks .... my son tried to convince me to look for a surly with disk brakes .... he is of the opinion that disk brakes are the way to go, but I wanted a long haul trucker.

I will see how the brakes work, and if they need better brakes, I will sort it. I might first try Kool stop salmon brake blocks and see if there is an improvement
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Old 03-19-16, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
thanks .... my son tried to convince me to look for a surly with disk brakes .... he is of the opinion that disk brakes are the way to go, but I wanted a long haul trucker.

I will see how the brakes work, and if they need better brakes, I will sort it. I might first try Kool stop salmon brake blocks and see if there is an improvement
They are good pads. Used them with other, more effective, cantis on my previous commuter.
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Old 03-19-16, 03:07 PM
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IDK what 'Better' means to you? V brakes change the Leverage , higher on the wheel end , Lower on the hand lever end .

It is the balance , cantilevers have more hand lever advantage a little less MA on the caliper ,

but the Pad to rim friction is what slows the wheel.. I too use KS pads , made just 200 miles from here.
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Old 03-19-16, 04:44 PM
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For a rear rack I used a chromed steel Wald with Surly Nice Rack upper mount hardware. I liked the retro look of the Wald and it is very easy to clean.The Wald was $17 and the Surly hardware $30.

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Old 03-19-16, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
thanks .... my son tried to convince me to look for a surly with disk brakes .... he is of the opinion that disk brakes are the way to go, but I wanted a long haul trucker.

I will see how the brakes work, and if they need better brakes, I will sort it. I might first try Kool stop salmon brake blocks and see if there is an improvement
I had the tekro stock brakes and it worked fine for my 180-300 pound loads. That being said the disc trucker is nice and has appeal, but it is overkill for most. I will wait until there are more hydraulic road options with thru axles.
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Old 03-20-16, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
Congrats on the new purchase.

Others will undoubtedly disagree, but I've used those brakes on another Surly model and, in my opinion, they are not safe for commuting. I'm 153 lbs. and I could barely lock up the rear wheel, no matter how I fiddled with them. I would get a set of reasonably priced "V" brakes and appropriate levers before I put another dime or shilling or whatever into the bike.
I read on a blog, that some people buy the Surly Long Haul disk trucker fork, then use the fork on their long haul trucker which has v-brakes.

So, you end up with disk brakes in the front, and the normal v-brakes at the back

the fork is cheap, not sure what the rest of the gear costs to convert it to disk brakes in the front. Not sure if I will go this way, but it is an option
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Old 03-20-16, 11:54 PM
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
I read on a blog, that some people buy the Surly Long Haul disk trucker fork, then use the fork on their long haul trucker which has v-brakes.

So, you end up with disk brakes in the front, and the normal v-brakes at the back

the fork is cheap, not sure what the rest of the gear costs to convert it to disk brakes in the front. Not sure if I will go this way, but it is an option
There is also the likely issue of a colour mismatch of the forks to the rest of the bike.
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