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I need a new bike.

Old 03-29-16, 02:24 PM
  #1  
kennj123
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I need a new bike.

I have a mountain bike that apparently needs to be replaced. The chain is jumping and LBS said the chain is stretched and crank and rear cassette needs to be replaced. I use the bike really hard in a urban environment. At intersections I get to the front and wait in the crosswalk, I put it in gear 3-2 and stand on the pedal, pull down on the handle bar and accelerate really fast. It has sram mrx plus shifters that i can shift while I'm standing. I don't really care about how heavy the bike is and I'd like a paint job - design that doesn't attract attention because I go in some pretty sketchy neighborhoods. The LBS said i should get a crank that has gears that can be individually changed. I would like to find an older bike that i can get reasonably cheap and replace parts cheaply. any ideas? I do like a triple front crank.

As an alternative, is there a heavy duty crank-chain-cassette combo that i should look at upgrading my old bike to? I really like the old bike, there is something about the way be pedals, seat and handle bar allign that make it easy to stand and pedal while pulling down on the handle bars.

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Old 03-29-16, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
I have a mountain bike that apparently needs to be replaced. The chain is jumping and LBS said the chain is stretched and crank and rear cassette needs to be replaced. I use the bike really hard in a urban environment.
No, you just didn't replace your chain when it needed to be replaced, and ruined the rest of your drivetrain. Lesson learned I guess.
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Old 03-29-16, 02:50 PM
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If you like your bike, fits you well, no reason not to drop some coin on new parts to get it running tip top. Especially if you want to keep the "old bike" look.

Pretty much any new crank/cassette/chain combo will withstand some intense loads. They just wear out over time.
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Old 03-29-16, 03:03 PM
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You don't need a new bike. You need to replace the chain, cassette and probably the chainrings. Riding the way you do is VERY HARD on all 3 components. Take a cycling class and learn how to ride a bike correctly.
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Old 03-29-16, 05:29 PM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
I need a new bike.
Of course you do.
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Old 03-29-16, 05:54 PM
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Ride downhill only. And coast. JK
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Old 03-29-16, 06:11 PM
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I say just get it fixed.

The only big problem with what you do is shifting at a stop. Shifting works better when the system is moving, torque is pretty low, and one gear at a time especially when pulling cable to go to bigger cogs. If you pull a lot of gears while it's not rotating it's really going to put a lot of tension in the cable and then grind the chain against the sides of the cogs while you get moving. You really should try to get into your takeoff gear before you stop, just like driving a stick, it's just easier on everything. Once it's in gear the system really doens't care, it can take what torque you can dish out.

If you still decide you really want something stronger you could look at a 3-speed hub, or a BMX or fixie drive train. But that's a lot fewer gears.
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Old 03-29-16, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
No, you just didn't replace your chain when it needed to be replaced, and ruined the rest of your drivetrain. Lesson learned I guess.
thats a bit frustrating for a couple reasons. First, I've looked at a couple stores around me selling bike parts. A couple sell chains and the tool for removing links but none sell the tool for measuring stretch in the chain. I saw a couple places on ebay sell it, i'll order it from them. Also, the bike was at the LBS just 6 weeks ago, they know i ride the bike hard, I feel let down that they hadn't checked this. Okay, so what else bike maintenance do i need to do that if i delay it will cause other parts to fail prematurely?
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Old 03-29-16, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by RonH View Post
Take a cycling class and learn how to ride a bike correctly.
okay Pops...
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Old 03-29-16, 07:40 PM
  #10  
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I'm not understanding why you don't replace the parts that you wore out. Getting a new bike isn't going to change the way you ride. Change 'em, wear 'em out, change 'em again.
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Old 03-29-16, 07:53 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
First, I've looked at a couple stores around me selling bike parts ...none sell the tool for measuring stretch in the chain.
A decent metal ruler with fine markings is a great tool to measure chains. At least a few of us consider it to be more accurate than using an inexpensive 'chain checker' tool. Check out the page below on Sheldon Brown's site -- specifically the section of the page titled "Measuring Chain Wear".

Chain Maintenance

Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
Also, the bike was at the LBS just 6 weeks ago, they know i ride the bike hard, I feel let down that they hadn't checked this. Okay, so what else bike maintenance do i need to do that if i delay it will cause other parts to fail prematurely?
It's not like anything they would've told you six weeks ago could've prevented the problem. The worn chain has been wearing on other components a lot longer than that. If you would've swapped your chain six weeks ago, it probably would've started slipping then, and even worse, because new chains don't mesh well with worn-out freewheel cogs.

The ways to prevent this problem from happening again are (1) ride with technique that's less likely to damage the drivetrain components or wear them out prematurely, and (2) replace chains periodically so a worn chain doesn't damage other parts.

Ron's tone may have come off as condescending (not that the snarky reply was any better), but he does have a point. Mashing the pedals is hard on the bike. Darth Lefty expands on that thought in his advice, including some of the reasons it's not good to shift under load. Adding one more point to his helpful advice, shifting under heavy load can also get the chain jammed some places it's not supposed to be, causing damage to drivetrain components or even the frame.

Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
Okay, so what else bike maintenance do i need to do that if i delay it will cause other parts to fail prematurely?
Well, you found the big one. The hard way.

One other item comes to mind: Keeping your chain lubricated and (relatively) clean will slow down its wear rate, prolonging its life.
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Old 03-29-16, 08:05 PM
  #12  
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If you decide to not maintain your bicycles with proper lube and disposable part replacement.... it will make cycling much more expensive.

There are tons of bicycle repair books/manuals at the library that can be borrowed for free. And all the repair videos you can watch (for free) on youtube. Most cities have what is called bicycle co-ops that help people with repairs and parts.... often very cheaply or even for free. Take a little time and learn how to care for your bikes.
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Old 03-29-16, 08:16 PM
  #13  
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Your bike is toast. I wouldn't be surprised if you warped the frame. Time for a titanium upgrade.
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Old 03-29-16, 08:27 PM
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If you like shift while standing - why not look at IGH hub? Your frame may allow to adjust chain tension or you can use chain tensioner.
You can just buy pre-built rear wheel and shifter or used bike with IGH and swap parts onto yours or rebuild your current wheel with IGH of your choice
You can also look at NuVinci hub, I am not a big fun of its weight but I did like it for city riding
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Old 03-29-16, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post

Mashing the pedals is hard on the bike. Darth Lefty expands on that thought in his advice, including some of the reasons it's not good to shift under load. Adding one more point to his helpful advice, shifting under heavy load can also get the chain jammed some places it's not supposed to be, causing damage to drivetrain components or even the frame.
I need to keep one bike for urban riding that can take some pedal mashing. My understanding and experience the crank shouldn't be gear shifted under load, but the cassette can be without jamming. I'd like to upgrade the drive chain to some relatively cheap but strong components that can be replaced easily in the future, for instance a crank with chain rings that can be changed separately.
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Old 03-30-16, 06:33 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
I need to keep one bike for urban riding that can take some pedal mashing. My understanding and experience the crank shouldn't be gear shifted under load, but the cassette can be without jamming. I'd like to upgrade the drive chain to some relatively cheap but strong components that can be replaced easily in the future, for instance a crank with chain rings that can be changed separately.
The term cheap and strong don't usually go hand in hand. What kind of bike is this by the way?
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Old 03-30-16, 06:41 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
thats a bit frustrating for a couple reasons. First, I've looked at a couple stores around me selling bike parts. A couple sell chains and the tool for removing links but none sell the tool for measuring stretch in the chain. I saw a couple places on ebay sell it, i'll order it from them.
You should ask your LBS if they have one. I'd be surprised if they didn't. Or you could use a steel ruler to measure your chain.

Also, the bike was at the LBS just 6 weeks ago, they know i ride the bike hard, I feel let down that they hadn't checked this.
Yes, that is unfortunate if the bike was in for a tune up that they didn't check the chain. On the other hand if it was in for something else, then I wouldn't expect them to check the chain just by chance.

Okay, so what else bike maintenance do i need to do that if i delay it will cause other parts to fail prematurely?
Lube your chain frequently, measure it regularly, replace it before it's stretched too much.
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Old 03-30-16, 06:44 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by TenSpeedV2 View Post
The term cheap and strong don't usually go hand in hand. What kind of bike is this by the way?
its an older 21 speed Montague, folding bike. i take it on the train quite a bit and foldable bikes are allowed on during rush hours. I am willing to trade off weight, heavy is fine with me (up to a point).
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Old 03-30-16, 06:52 AM
  #19  
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I ride a Dahon Espresso to do the same thing. Or Dahon Jack. Check them out. A step up from the Montague, and still 26"

Not good for mashing, though. Look up spinning and be open to changing your approach to gearing.

Also, go ahead and replace your crankset, chain, and cassette if you want to keep the bike. A new one will wear just as fast with your style of riding unless you change your chain often. Cheers
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Old 03-30-16, 07:43 AM
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none sell the tool for measuring stretch in the chain.
I use a tape measure, but I more often check by just pulling on a chain link near the front of the chain ring. If it pulls up quite a bit over the teeth, I'll measure but most likely the measurement is a formality.


at the LBS just 6 weeks ago, they know i ride the bike hard, I feel let down that they hadn't checked this.
It's best to not rely on someone else to check

what else bike maintenance do i need to do that if i delay it will cause other parts to fail prematurely?

Habitually I'll check the air, brakes and cables before a ride. Just a quick inspection of a few seconds. Air includes noticing any new defects and wear in the tire. Cables is mainly if they're frayed, loose or don't feel smooth. Brakes is pads, operational, and a reasonable gap between pads and rim.

Now and again I like to spin the wheels to check that the wheel is still true and nothing strange is going on with the hubs. Finally any weird or new noise while riding means a closer examination is in order.
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Old 03-30-16, 09:27 AM
  #21  
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Go online, maybe even EBay, get some replacement parts, do the swap yourself. Aside from a $6--$10 cassette unlocker and a similarly priced chain whip you shouldn't need any special tools. Chainrings shouldn't be much if the cranks are still good (no reason it ever wouldn't be) chain is $12--$25 deopending on how hard you look, and a cassette is $25 and up depending on how much you want to pay to save grams on your overweight, overage beat-bike.

Mashing is fine, shifting while standing is fine. Shifting at a stop is kind of dumb (IMO) ... just click down as you brake and be ready to go if you like fast launches, instead of slowing yuor launch while yanking your chain around---but even so, it isn't instantly fatal. Replace your chain every couple thousand miles or as needed, your cassette every few chains or as needed, your chainrings as needed.

Ride the way you like, of course ... you are paying for the privilege. I might advise a few changes, but I am not about to sponsor you, so there is no reason you need to care what I say.

Bikes are supposed to be fun .... except for Serious Cyclists, who only acknowledge it as a Serious Ride if it hurt from start to finish. The rest of us can ride around with big smiles and even laugh while we ride. It's okay.
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Old 03-30-16, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Mashing is fine, shifting while standing is fine. Shifting at a stop is kind of dumb (IMO) ...
I don't know how shifting when stopped came up. i think its pretty dumb too. I went to another LBS and they say only the rear cassette needs to be replaced and will do it pretty cheap. (i already changed the chain). I ask them if i can get an extra cassette from them and i change it myself next time. I looked through Ebay and i'm a bit confused about what part to get. if they give me a cassette then i just have to worry about tools for now.
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Old 04-01-16, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
I don't know how shifting when stopped came up. i think its pretty dumb too. I went to another LBS and they say only the rear cassette needs to be replaced and will do it pretty cheap. (i already changed the chain). I ask them if i can get an extra cassette from them and i change it myself next time. I looked through Ebay and i'm a bit confused about what part to get. if they give me a cassette then i just have to worry about tools for now.
We were talking about it because maybe we misunderstood your first post where you said,

Originally Posted by kennj123 View Post
At intersections I get to the front and wait in the crosswalk, I put it in gear 3-2 and stand on the pedal, pull down on the handle bar and accelerate really fast. It has sram mrx plus shifters that i can shift while I'm standing.
To change the cassette, you need a chain whip, and a splined socket for a Shimano-style cassette. The socket is to turn the lock ring. The chain whip is needed to hang on to the cassette since you need to unscrew the lock ring in the same direction that the hub ratchets. It's pretty easy, don't worry that you can't do it.

Examples
Sprocket Remover / Chain Whip | Park Tool
Cassette Lockring Tool | Park Tool
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Old 04-01-16, 05:50 PM
  #24  
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>>At intersections I get to the front and wait in the crosswalk, I put it in gear 3-2 and stand on the pedal, pull down on the handle bar and accelerate really fast. It has sram mrx plus shifters that i can shift while I'm standing.<<

All i meant is that I've already shifted into 3-2 when i see i'm not going to make the light before i come to a stop in the cross walk. Then i stand on the pedals and pull down on the handle bars and every few feet i shift up to a higher gear. I think i get max acceleration with that technique.

My LBS changed it for a decent price this time, next time I'll do it.

the more complicated issue for me is which one should i get? will pretty much any of these 7 gear ones work?

7 speed Bicycle Cassettes, Freewheels and Cogs | eBay
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Old 04-01-16, 06:09 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
To change the cassette, you need a chain whip, and a splined socket for a Shimano-style cassette. The socket is to turn the lock ring. The chain whip is needed to hang on to the cassette since you need to unscrew the lock ring in the same direction that the hub ratchets. It's pretty easy, don't worry that you can't do it.
You also need a big wrench to turn the lockring tool. But that's not a specialty item.
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