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Motobecane TI: Century Pro vs Fantom Cross?

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Motobecane TI: Century Pro vs Fantom Cross?

Old 04-17-16, 09:32 PM
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Motobecane TI: Century Pro vs Fantom Cross?

There are two titanium frames I've been looking at on BikesDirect.

Save Up to 60% Off Disc Brake Road Bikes - Motobecane Turino TEAM Hydraulic Disc Brake Road Bikes
Save Up To 60% Off Titanium Cyclocross Bicycles | Road Bikes - Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Titanium | Cross Bikes

I assume one is a more road-oriented frame and the other is more cyclocross. What would the differences be between these two frames? The Century Pro comes with hydro brakes while the fantom only offers mech brakes. Are the hydro brakes worth the extra price?
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Old 04-17-16, 10:42 PM
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Cyclocross frames are actually quite different even when the geometry is the same. Cyclocross bikes have the cables routed across the top of the top tube for example, because cross bikes are made to be carried on the shoulders during the races. Obviously also cyclocross bikes run much wider tires; these tires would not fit at all on the vast majority of road frames. They are not the same thing, even if they look similar.

I have never had hydro discs on a road bike but I believe they would be worth it, yes. If I were to sell my current road bike, I would only replace it with a road bike that had hydro dics. I might wait a few years until they become universal instead of just an interesting and shiny new feature.

Also, look carefully at the cranksets and gearing on these bikes. Cyclocross gearing is different than road and if you intended to buy the cross bike and use it as a road bike with more tire clearance, you're in for a surprise.
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Old 04-18-16, 04:22 AM
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I'm really liking my Century Pro Titanium Hyd brakes. I have another bicycle that has Hydraulic disc and they are Great! So I knew I wanted hydraulic disc on my road bike, and have been waiting for hydraulic brifters which the Century Pro has. The Century Pro is now my due it all bicycle... road, commuter, light touring.
twodownzero is correct that the chain ring is different, and they route cables along the top tube. While cabling along top tube is great for cyclocross, I personally did not care for it with my more utilitarian use for the bicycle.
The Century Pro can handle tires up to 40mm wide, not sure about the Fantom.
And yes, IMHO the hydraulic brakes are worth the price, especially hydraulic brifters.
Here's a photo of mine taken earlier this month while on the GAP trail.
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gap2016.jpg (104.0 KB, 311 views)
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Old 04-18-16, 09:28 AM
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Fantastic looking bike! What size is that?

Did you have to make a choice between the two frames? It seem to me it might be the same fork on both, so I think tire clearance might be the same. Gearing is definitely different between the two sets but that can always be changed out.

I was definitely looking more for an adventure bike (I like grass and woods), but the hydro brake aren't available on the Fantom line yet.
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Old 04-18-16, 10:55 AM
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Those two bikes have different forks. The Fantom Cross uses a 1 1/8" threadless, while the Century uses a 1 1/8" to 1 1/2" tapered threadless.

Another difference is that the Fantom Cross locates the rear disc caliper behind the seatstay, while the Century has it between the seatstay and the chainstay. This might be significant if you plan on using racks and panniers.
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Old 04-18-16, 11:14 AM
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Its a 58cm with about a 32.75" stand over height.
No, I did not have to choose. The most important things I was looking for in an all around bicycle were hydraulic disc/ brifters, drop bars, wide tire capable and rack mounts. Did not want a carbon fiber frame for this kind of utility bicycle, aluminum frame just not very compliant ride, steel would be ok but they need paint which will chip over time, so then enter titanium.
I really did not want the top tube/ cabling used on cyclocross bicycles, so Titanium Century Ti Hyd checked off all the right properties I was looking for in a bicycle. And I am very pleased with it, great ride, very compliant and smooth, all the components work very well together.
While I think it is a great for what I use it for I'm not sure I would call it an adventure bicycle. I usually think more of a mountain bicycle as an adventure bicycle. Not sure how the Century Pro would handle "woods" and such.
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Old 04-23-16, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
Its a 58cm with about a 32.75" stand over height.
No, I did not have to choose. The most important things I was looking for in an all around bicycle were hydraulic disc/ brifters, drop bars, wide tire capable and rack mounts. Did not want a carbon fiber frame for this kind of utility bicycle, aluminum frame just not very compliant ride, steel would be ok but they need paint which will chip over time, so then enter titanium.
I really did not want the top tube/ cabling used on cyclocross bicycles, so Titanium Century Ti Hyd checked off all the right properties I was looking for in a bicycle. And I am very pleased with it, great ride, very compliant and smooth, all the components work very well together.
While I think it is a great for what I use it for I'm not sure I would call it an adventure bicycle. I usually think more of a mountain bicycle as an adventure bicycle. Not sure how the Century Pro would handle "woods" and such.
A bike that can handle 45mm tires probably has more adventure in it than you give it credit for!
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Old 04-26-16, 05:03 AM
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Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
A bike that can handle 45mm tires probably has more adventure in it than you give it credit for!
I'm not so sure this bicycle will take 45mm tires. I measured the chain stay width and it was 46mm, seat stays were 45.5mm. The front fork could handle 45's as it measured 50mm wide.
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Old 04-26-16, 07:34 AM
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not only are the brakes different but the cranksets are as well. the fantom has cyclocross 46-36 ultegra vs the century pro has 50/34 FSA gossamer. If you are going to ride mostly on the road a 50/ 34 would be better. If off road the fantom might be better for you.

I like the century personally I think it would make a great commuter/ light tourer. I have a friend who has the straight up road titanium and I think I like the multi use characteristics of the century pro. I think they also have a century comp that might be lower price but I am not sure of component differences.

I have toured on an aluminium FantomCX and it does well but for longer rides I think I would enjoy an more upright position.

I agree with two piece. 40mm tires on this bike would be so fun. I have 35mm fenders and run 28mm tires and I rode a metric century on it and I was able to hang with and maintain a decent speed. They are good solid bikes.
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Old 04-26-16, 03:54 PM
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I purchased the Century Pro Titanium a month or two ago and have been using it for trail, road, and commuting. Chose it over other bikes, because of the hydraulic brakes, titanium frame, and clearance for tires up to 45mm.
Added a Goatlink and run 12-40 rear cassette on hilly/mountainous trails. I swap out wheels for weekday road and commuting.

http://imgur.com/pM4x0NK

Originally Posted by ShadowGray View Post
There are two titanium frames I've been looking at on BikesDirect.

Save Up to 60% Off Disc Brake Road Bikes - Motobecane Turino TEAM Hydraulic Disc Brake Road Bikes
Save Up To 60% Off Titanium Cyclocross Bicycles | Road Bikes - Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Titanium | Cross Bikes

I assume one is a more road-oriented frame and the other is more cyclocross. What would the differences be between these two frames? The Century Pro comes with hydro brakes while the fantom only offers mech brakes. Are the hydro brakes worth the extra price?
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Old 04-26-16, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by natemeister View Post
I purchased the Century Pro Titanium a month or two ago and have been using it for trail, road, and commuting. Chose it over other bikes, because of the hydraulic brakes, titanium frame, and clearance for tires up to 45mm.
Added a Goatlink and run 12-40 rear cassette on hilly/mountainous trails. I swap out wheels for weekday road and commuting.

Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet
Have you measured the distance between your seat stays? I do not think 45mm tires will fit on the rear, mine only measured 45.5mm and I think you need more than .5 mm clearance.
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Old 04-26-16, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
Have you measured the distance between your seat stays? I do not think 45mm tires will fit on the rear, mine only measured 45.5mm and I think you need more than .5 mm clearance.
I'll have to do that when I get home tonight. I was remembering the clearance from other threads, but you're right, their website says 40mm.
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Old 05-25-16, 07:49 PM
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Two questions for you proud Century Pro owners:

1) Will the fork accept a front rack? From the pics on the BD website it looks like there is some sort of mount on the fork, but I can't tell if it is in the lowrider position.

2) What is the length of the fork? From axle to crown? I'm trying to calculate the stack.

thanks!

P.s. Thanks for sharing your assembly video on YT, natemeister!

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Old 06-01-16, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Animal157 View Post
Two questions for you proud Century Pro owners:

1) Will the fork accept a front rack? From the pics on the BD website it looks like there is some sort of mount on the fork, but I can't tell if it is in the lowrider position.

2) What is the length of the fork? From axle to crown? I'm trying to calculate the stack.

thanks!

P.s. Thanks for sharing your assembly video on YT, natemeister!
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Old 06-01-16, 10:07 AM
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it should; and 14.75"
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Old 06-03-16, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
it should; and 14.75"
Thanks! I was worried that mount in the fork was too low for a lowrider rack (or not beefy enough to support a rack). I've been looking for a picture of this fork/bike with a font rack installed and have come up empty. I've thought about asking BD.com if it supports a rack.

14.75in seems short compared to most road forks.. Let alone be that supports a 40c tire.

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Old 06-03-16, 07:29 PM
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My road bike measures 14" to crown, the Century Pro is 14.75". The fork is pretty beefy, looks like a low rider rack would use the mounting boss but I do not use front racks so really not sure.
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Old 06-05-16, 06:46 AM
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From BD:

The fork on the Motobecane Century Pro Ti has mid fork eyelets, but no eyelets by the dropouts. If you can find a rack that only needs the one set of eyelets and doesn't clamp to the fork legs than you should be ok mounting a rack.
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Old 06-05-16, 07:20 AM
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I was thinking a rack like this may work.
Axiom Journey Suspension and Disc Low-rider, Black [Sports]
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Old 06-05-16, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
I was thinking a rack like this may work.
Axiom Journey Suspension and Disc Low-rider, Black [Sports]
not sure that one would work as it involves clamping the fork - a no-no for carbon. The Surly might work if you can also mount to the crown where the fenders would mount.
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Old 06-06-16, 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Animal157 View Post
not sure that one would work as it involves clamping the fork - a no-no for carbon. The Surly might work if you can also mount to the crown where the fenders would mount.
Did you see the strip that the clamp bolts to, looks like that would line up with the boss in the rack and the fork also has mounting hole for rim brakes.
Why is clamping it a no-no to clamp carbon fiber? I have a carbon fiber set post and carbon fiber handlebars both of witch are clamped.

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Old 06-06-16, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
the fork also has mounting hole for rim brakes.
I think we are talking about the same hole... at the top of the fork directly above the tire. One would need to use that hole and the mid-fork mounts to mount a rack. a stand alone lowrider rack likely won't work as they don't reach up toward the fork crown.

Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
Why is clamping it a no-no to clamp carbon fiber? I have a carbon fiber set post and carbon fiber handlebars both of witch are clamped.
Some things are meant to be clamped and are designed accordingly. carbon forks generally aren't. the BD response expressly mentions that any front rack should not be clamped to the fork.
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Old 06-06-16, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by 2 Piece View Post
Why is clamping it a no-no to clamp carbon fiber? I have a carbon fiber set post and carbon fiber handlebars both of witch are clamped.

Clamping to a carbon fiber fork may or may not be a good idea. CF seat posts and handlebars are designed to be clamped (and even then may have narrow ranges of use, such as the caution against using seat post clamp on racks on some CF seat posts. CF composites are anisotropic (different properties / strengths in different dimensions), and a designer might not have left the margin needed to handle forces from a clamp on rack.
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