Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Buyer's remorse? Or did I make a less-than-optimal choice of bike?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Buyer's remorse? Or did I make a less-than-optimal choice of bike?

Old 04-23-16, 08:57 PM
  #26  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,894
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
I have the Scwalbe CX Pro 700C x 30 wire bead tires on the touring bike I ride on paved and dirt and gravel roads.

Schwalbe CX Pro 700 x 30 Wire Tire - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

The tire is designed to be run with lower pressure if on soft terrain. The higher pressure is great for hard-pack and pavement.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 04-23-16, 09:42 PM
  #27  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,816

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
Yes, the TRPs replaced the stock Tektro mini-vs.

These came stock w/ Avid FR5 flat-rate -- and non-adjustable -- levers, which were designed to work with any linear-pull (v) brake and Avid BB7s. The TRPs worked perfectly well (as I defined that above) with those; I then swapped out the FR5s for the SD7s on my mtb -- simply because the latter are nicer/better made.

Whatever. For you, some sort of theory trumps practice/experience. Fine; for me, there have been no compatibility issues whatsoever, so practical application trumps 'theory'. I'm out of this tedious exchange.
Sorry you're butthurt over this, you really shouldn't take these things so personally. However, it doesn't change the fact that short pull brake levers shouldn't be paired with long pull brakes, nor the other way around. I'm glad you're happy with the setup, but quoting Sheldon Brown:

Direct-pull brake levers used with any other type of brakes will feel nice and solid when you squeeze them, but due to their lower mechanical advantage you'll need to squeeze twice as hard to stop as you should, so unless you are a lightweight rider with gorilla-like paws, this combination isn't safe either.


http://www.sheldonbrown.com/canti-direct.html

So I'll correct myself when I described that they should feel grabby, I forget that the although the pull of V-brake levers is double that of regular, it's not a strong pull.

My recommendation remains to the OP, don't install mini-V brakes to solve your problem unless you know that your brake levers are compatible with them.
dr_lha is offline  
Old 04-23-16, 09:59 PM
  #28  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,905

Bikes: 2017 Surly Troll with XT Drive Train, 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1242 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by nowherebound View Post
Hello -- New to the forum. And recently decided to get back into cycling, since my lovely kids have eroded most of my physical activity.

I just purchased a Specialized Sirrus Elite, with V-brake. But I am questioning whether I made the right choice due to the limitation on tire width. It comes with a 30mm tire (on 15 mm rim) and at the shop they told me the widest tire I might be able to put on it is a 32mm due to the V-brakes and fork interfering. I originally had my head and heart set on 35mm tires. From what I have read, that seems to be the sweet-spot for tires for a mix of urban, gravel riding paths, and occasional section of muddy forest paths -- that's mostly what I'll do. Maybe occasionally a 20-40km+ day-ride with the family. Somehow I like the look of a slightly wider tire with a little bit of inverted (?) tread. But when I test-rode the bike at the shop, I was very pleasantly surprised with how smooth the bike was and comfortable over bumps. It's a reputable bike shop, and they were very emphatic that there 30mm was plenty good for my needs, just need to inflate the tires regularly, etc.

I'm not an intense rider, so maybe not worth analyzing as much as I am. But I like to have the right equipment for whatever I do. And I would hate to think I made a bad choice that would limit my options, but would rather know now.

So many different opinions on the web -- but I am reaching out for even more opinions. Did I make a not-so-good choice? Or am I over analyzing and everything will be fine? (I weigh 200lbs/91kg if that matters)

Thanks in advance. Hoping to be a more active member in the future!
There is a very good chance that your bike will be fine for the conditions you have nominated, so give it a go and see.

If you decide the bike isn't the right one for you, if you sell it immediately, you may not take that much of a financial hit and could start again.

Easily the most versatile hybrid bike I have seen is the Giant Toughroad Series, which can take tyres up to 58mm and would be just as happy on 28mm for city riding.
ColonelSanders is offline  
Old 04-23-16, 10:01 PM
  #29  
molten
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 695
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nowherebound View Post
Hello -- New to the forum. And recently decided to get back into cycling, since my lovely kids have eroded most of my physical activity.

I just purchased a Specialized Sirrus Elite, with V-brake. But I am questioning whether I made the right choice due to the limitation on tire width. It comes with a 30mm tire (on 15 mm rim) and at the shop they told me the widest tire I might be able to put on it is a 32mm due to the V-brakes and fork interfering. I originally had my head and heart set on 35mm tires. From what I have read, that seems to be the sweet-spot for tires for a mix of urban, gravel riding paths, and occasional section of muddy forest paths -- that's mostly what I'll do. Maybe occasionally a 20-40km+ day-ride with the family. Somehow I like the look of a slightly wider tire with a little bit of inverted (?) tread. But when I test-rode the bike at the shop, I was very pleasantly surprised with how smooth the bike was and comfortable over bumps. It's a reputable bike shop, and they were very emphatic that there 30mm was plenty good for my needs, just need to inflate the tires regularly, etc.

I'm not an intense rider, so maybe not worth analyzing as much as I am. But I like to have the right equipment for whatever I do. And I would hate to think I made a bad choice that would limit my options, but would rather know now.

So many different opinions on the web -- but I am reaching out for even more opinions. Did I make a not-so-good choice? Or am I over analyzing and everything will be fine? (I weigh 200lbs/91kg if that matters)

Thanks in advance. Hoping to be a more active member in the future!
I only skimmed through your review; as My real attention be of the comments of others.
There be nothing wrong of "over-analyzing."
(in comparison) "Over-analyzing" in this case: is equal to taking too much effort/time, in making a judgment against the driving of another driver near you. As you worry for the sake of YOUR safety. The trouble being, here in the United States, most drivers (esp motor vehicle; but also applied to many cyclists) don't "analyze" enough, during their driving. So to prevent later trouble from coming.
It would be interesting to READ YOUR "over-analyzing" in driving with/against car traffic.
~Afterall, YOU being in Canada. That be where/how you differ, from so many in the USA.~
I would be interested to read your such future comments, be you normally analytic.
molten is offline  
Old 04-23-16, 10:04 PM
  #30  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,905

Bikes: 2017 Surly Troll with XT Drive Train, 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1242 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
My recommendation remains to the OP, don't install mini-V brakes to solve your problem unless you know that your brake levers are compatible with them.
It wouldn't be the end of the world to get new and better brake levers to guarantee compatibility.
ColonelSanders is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 05:59 AM
  #31  
deapee
Ride On!
 
deapee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 975

Bikes: Allez DSW SL Sprint | Fuji Cross

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 226 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
32c is fine...more than enough. I've done singletrack on 32c and obviously no suspension. I found it so overkill that I'm on 25's now and will be on 28's when these wear out.
deapee is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 06:35 AM
  #32  
JonathanGennick 
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 4,004

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by nowherebound View Post
I originally had my head and heart set on 35mm tires. From what I have read, that seems to be the sweet-spot for tires for a mix of urban, gravel riding paths, and occasional section of muddy forest paths -- that's mostly what I'll do. Maybe occasionally a 20-40km+ day-ride with the family.
Waffled back and forth on whether to post earlier. My only worry in what you list are those "muddy forest paths". The Sirrus is a flat-bar road bike, and is not what I would think to normally take onto singletrack or into mud. The thing is, what people mean by mud can vary by a wide margin, and so can the smoothness (or lack thereof) of those "forest paths".

You can probably get away with a smooth path. Avoid mud though, because cleaning the bike afterward is a pain. Mud is horrible on a drivetrain. Despite the common image of mountain-biking through mud, I stick mainly to dry trails.

You'll love the Sirrus on those 20-40 km rides. Roads and bike paths are where it will shine. IMHO.
JonathanGennick is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:18 AM
  #33  
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Posts: 8,000

Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is a great bike! Ride it and enjoy it!
Wanderer is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:20 AM
  #34  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 30,995

Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Ride much.

Rest when you need days off.
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"
10 Wheels is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:22 PM
  #35  
rnothog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 86

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Roubaix Comp Di2; 2016 Giant Roam 1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
The Sirrus Elite Disc was going to be my choice. In red. Beautiful bike.

Then I decided that a suspension fork with lockout and wider tires weren't all bad, since my riding will hopefully take me to the canals and (a bit) into the desert environs of metro Phoenix.

But I too, am having second thoughts. That Sirrus. In red. Yeah...

My Roam 1 comes in this week sometime. But that Sirrus...

Hmmm...

I once had 2 motorcycles...n+1.
rnothog is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:34 PM
  #36  
nowherebound
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Canada, eh.
Posts: 9

Bikes: Specialized Hard Rock Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
Waffled back and forth on whether to post earlier. My only worry in what you list are those "muddy forest paths". The Sirrus is a flat-bar road bike, and is not what I would think to normally take onto singletrack or into mud. The thing is, what people mean by mud can vary by a wide margin, and so can the smoothness (or lack thereof) of those "forest paths".

You can probably get away with a smooth path. Avoid mud though, because cleaning the bike afterward is a pain. Mud is horrible on a drivetrain. Despite the common image of mountain-biking through mud, I stick mainly to dry trails.

You'll love the Sirrus on those 20-40 km rides. Roads and bike paths are where it will shine. IMHO.

My description of "muddy forest paths" is probably not accurate in the context of experienced riders such as this forum. What I have ind mind is the smooth dirt path through the forest that we ride through with the kids occasionally. Not true "mud" compared to what many of you probably consider muddy. :-)

I'm just used to riding on my mountain bike (Specialized Hardrock comp) where I never feel the need to slow down for rocks or roots poking out of the ground....or sidewalks for that matter.

(And I haven't even talked about my second-guessing of my decision to go with the v-brake model rather than disc! :-) )
nowherebound is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
spectastic
Bicycle Mechanics
4
07-05-19 06:39 PM
Thumpic
Classic & Vintage
1
06-06-10 03:14 PM
Blacksail
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
6
03-09-09 08:33 PM
alwaysbefirst
Road Cycling
1
07-25-05 03:26 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.