Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Need to choose the right wheel and hub

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Need to choose the right wheel and hub

Old 05-16-16, 04:15 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Need to choose the right wheel and hub

Hello. I have a 21 speed hybrid bike, I have no idea what my wheels are other than they are 700c which is 28 inch or so.
My tires are 40-622.

I'm a guy who prefers stealth and my derailer is just too noisy(something somewhere is bent or it's gremlins or both), initially I thought to buy a single speed, but then I had a fracture and my knee hurts when I push too hard, so I decided for the middle option. And what I want is a rear wheel with an internal speed hub, thing is I have no idea whether one can properly fit onto my hybrid as the gap where the wheel and the hub sits is very wide.

For example will this be what I'm looking for?:

- 28- inch double-wall
- ETRTO size: 622-19
- Material: alloy
- Eyelets
- 36 holes
- Light weight and buckling resistant
- Valve stem: 8.5 mm (6.5 mm)
- Recommended tyre size: 28 - 62 mm
- Weight: 620g
- Colour: black eloxadised

Nexus Inter-8 Hub with 8-speed gear hub

- SHIMANO Nexus INTER-8 SG-C6000-8R
- Alloy
- Labyrinth seal: keeps away dirt and wet
- Rotary actuator (shifting under moderate pedalling loads )
- Narrow intervals, bigger conversion range (total conversion range expanded to 307%)
- Smoother running as predecessor and better changing
- Free wheel hub
- 36 holes
- Axle with acorn nuts
- Sprockets with 21 teeth
- Colour: silver polished
- Old: 130mm

I will repeat my question. How to measure the width the wheel (without disassembling it) will measure tape suffice? Whether I will need anything else to fit onto my bike and do I have to change the rear gear shifter?

Thanks.
jsisidore is offline  
Old 05-16-16, 04:57 AM
  #2  
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,839

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 913 Times in 603 Posts
Measure the distance between the inside faces of the frame "dropouts" where the axle nuts contact the frame. It is probably 130mm or 135 mm.

I don't know much about internal geared hubs "IGH", but assume it comes with its own shifter to match.

You probably need a crankset also, but perhaps could set the chain on the middle chainring and leave it there, and remove the front derailleur and shifter.

If your bike has vertical dropouts, the you need a chain idler to take up chain slack since you can't adjust the wheel in the frame.

Post pictures of your bike to help others give suggestions.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html

Last edited by Homebrew01; 05-16-16 at 05:02 AM.
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 05-16-16, 09:48 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,225

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1572 Post(s)
Liked 642 Times in 363 Posts
I recently bought a NOS Shimano silent clutch rear freehub. I don't remember where I bought it from but when I googled Shimano silent freehub several came up right away.

The original market for them was police bikes so they could silently sneak up on bad guys. It really is quiet having no freehub ratchet sound at all. Heavy little sucker, though. I didn't weigh it on a scale but the first time I picked it up in my hand I noticed it was heavier than the rear hubs that I'm used to.

I could build you a wheel that would be totally silent and fit your bike with no other modifications but you might not be happy with the $150 - $200 price.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

Last edited by Retro Grouch; 05-16-16 at 10:17 AM.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 05-16-16, 10:20 AM
  #4  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,352 Times in 859 Posts
But Cops like Mountain bikes , so You buy the 'Free-hub' with the silent driver ..
then get the wheel built around it. since the OP wanted roadie wheels ..

In order to satisfy all those requirements, try a Bike Shop and ask them to custom build a wheel to your exacting specifications ..



Want the shimano 8 speed internal gear hub?, dont expect it to be silent when you are coasting.

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-16-16 at 10:26 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 05-21-16, 10:24 AM
  #5  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Homebrew01
If your bike has vertical dropouts, the you need a chain idler to take up chain slack since you can't adjust the wheel in the frame.
You know I keep hearing this a lot. But is it really impossible to make the chain reasonably tense?
jsisidore is offline  
Old 05-21-16, 10:29 AM
  #6  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
The original market for them was police bikes so they could silently sneak up on bad guys. It really is quiet having no freehub ratchet sound at all. Heavy little sucker, though. I didn't weigh it on a scale but the first time I picked it up in my hand I noticed it was heavier than the rear hubs that I'm used to.
That is exactly what I want, to sneak up on people, I derive a perverse satisfaction from it.
jsisidore is offline  
Old 05-21-16, 10:32 AM
  #7  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
In order to satisfy all those requirements, try a Bike Shop and ask them to custom build a wheel to your exacting specifications ..
I will have to do this on my own as bike shops charge as though you're not a poor person.
jsisidore is offline  
Old 05-21-16, 10:40 AM
  #8  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,352 Times in 859 Posts
those that work there are not getting much More than Minimum wage

Tried getting a second Job? people do that to feed & take care of their Children.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 05-21-16, 10:53 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,033

Bikes: I own N+1 bikes, where N=0.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jsisidore
You know I keep hearing this a lot. But is it really impossible to make the chain reasonably tense?
It's possible, if you find just the right combination of chainring size, sprocket size, and chain length. You'll probably have to replace your chain more frequently, though, since you won't be able to adjust tension as it begins to wear.

More info here:
Fortunately, most "vertical" dropouts are not exactly vertical: they usually have a bit of a slant. As a result, it is sometimes possible to use this type of frame. To make it work, you may have to play games with chainwheel sizes. One of my fixed-gear bicycles is based on a Cannondale touring frame. It happens that there is just enough adjustment to make it work with my preferred 42/15 combination. If the chainstays were a bit different in length, I could replace the 42 with a 41 or 43.

Adding or subtracting a link in the chain will move the axle 1/2". Changing either sprocket size by one tooth is the equivalent of moving the axle 1/8" (4 mm). Thus, if I wanted a 5.75 gain ratio (75" / 6 meter gear), I might first try a 42/15, this gives a gain ratio of 5.77 (75.6" / 6.05 m gear). If the chain was too loose, I could take up 1/8" (4 mm) of axle movement by replacing the 42 with a 43. This 43/15 combination would raise my gain ratio to 5.91 (77.4" / 6.19 m). Alternately, I could get the same axle position with a 42/16 --5.41 (70.9" / 5.67 m).
Note that using a half link in your chain would move the axle 1/4".

Another option is a ghost sprocket, but I don't know how durable that solution is.

Finally, an eccentric bottom bracket offers another option to make adjustments to chain tension.

Last edited by Jaywalk3r; 05-21-16 at 11:03 AM.
Jaywalk3r is offline  
Old 05-22-16, 01:08 PM
  #10  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
those that work there are not getting much More than Minimum wage

Tried getting a second Job? people do that to feed & take care of their Children.
Once my business will kick in I will spend like an average human being. I'm sure it's just around the corner... yep...
jsisidore is offline  
Old 05-22-16, 01:20 PM
  #11  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r
It's possible, if you find just the right combination of chainring size, sprocket size, and chain length. You'll probably have to replace your chain more frequently, though, since you won't be able to adjust tension as it begins to wear.
I thought so.

Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r
Another option is a ghost sprocket, but I don't know how durable that solution is.
Neat photo.

Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r
Finally, an eccentric bottom bracket offers another option to make adjustments to chain tension.
Whoa!
jsisidore is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Hoffsta
Classic & Vintage
4
07-20-19 02:50 PM
Bugstomper2000
Road Cycling
9
10-01-15 05:13 AM
Giant Doofus
Bicycle Mechanics
4
12-17-14 07:22 PM
stephr1
Bicycle Mechanics
7
01-14-11 03:04 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.