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First 10 mile ride - Looking for some advise

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First 10 mile ride - Looking for some advise

Old 05-27-16, 07:21 PM
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rs23
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First 10 mile ride - Looking for some advise

Hi Everyone,

I did my first 10 mile ride today and i have attached some metrics from my HRM and cadence sensor. I am looking for some advise on what i should do better since i bonked and couldnt do steep hills at all. Excuse my ignorance with biking lingo as im still learning.

1) I used smaller gear wheel (1) for downhill (2) for flat and (3) for uphill. My Bike has a 21 speed shimano shifters
2) It was around 90F this afternoon
3) I had to ride 3 to 4 steep hills and felt like i was going to passout on the last 2 since i could not do it and felt kinda funny to get down and push the bike up

My questions:
1) what could i have done better shifting gear wise to overcome this? especially hills
2) Please look at my metrics below and let me know if my cadence or speed should be tweaked
3) Is it my bike or is it just that i am a new rider

At the end of the ride i felt great mentally and physically but i just cant get over how tired i got during those hill climbs.

If this is a training related questions feel free to move this post to the right forum. Thanks!!

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Old 05-27-16, 08:03 PM
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Bonking is when your body runs out of fuel ... basically low blood sugar. You solve that by eating.

If it got to 90F, you might have been a bit dehydrated ... do you have a water bottle on your bicycle?

Cadence should be somewhere between 80 and 90.

And hills take a lot of practice.

Oh, and no way would you have burned 760 cal over 10 miles ... 10 miles = approx. 16 km. You probably burn about 100 cal/5 km = maybe just over 300 cal. If you're trying to lose weight, that might be something to keep in mind.

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Old 05-27-16, 08:05 PM
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Yes i had a pre workout supplement and water bottle with ice and water. Had a god protein shake an hour before the ride. The hills literally killed me. i felt like i was going to pass out lol

Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Bonking is when your body runs out of fuel ... basically low blood sugar. You solve that by eating.

If it got to 90F, you might have been a bit dehydrated ... do you have a water bottle on your bicycle?

Cadence should be somewhere between 80 and 90.

And hills take a lot of practice.
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Old 05-27-16, 08:17 PM
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Looks good to me ... you are just new to biking is all.

The heat makes everything harder, of course.

Hills are hard because they demand constant effort, and put a load on your whole body. This isn't something you probably do too often.

Your cadence was good, particularly for climbing four hills in ten miles. Your HR was okay for a new rider climbing steep hills.

The idea with the gears is to find combinations of gears so that you can maintain a comfortable pace--one where you can breath, your heart doesn't explode, and your legs keep the pedals turning--no matter the terrain.

The way it works sort of is that the smaller the rear gear, the harder to pedal, and the smaller the front gear, the easier to pedal ... for most hills you might astart in the middle ring up front and back, then shift down a little in the back as you get tired, then shift Up in the back(towards the larder, outside cog) a gear or two and Down in the front (to the smallest, inside ring.) Then as the hill stretches on, keep shifting Down (in the back (towards the inside, larger cogs) while staying ion the little ring up front.

In general (and everyone is an exception) you don't want to be spinning around so fast your are bouncing on the seat and you don't want to be pedaling so slowly and so hard you can barely push the pedals down. Most people would probably suggest 70-90 as a good cadence.

i'd guess (not knowing your exercise schedule or level of fitness) that you did pretty well for a first ride, and all you need is to keep riding.
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Old 05-27-16, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Looks good to me ... you are just new to biking is all.

The heat makes everything harder, of course.

Hills are hard because they demand constant effort, and put a load on your whole body. This isn't something you probably do too often.

Your cadence was good, particularly for climbing four hills in ten miles. Your HR was okay for a new rider climbing steep hills.

The idea with the gears is to find combinations of gears so that you can maintain a comfortable pace--one where you can breath, your heart doesn't explode, and your legs keep the pedals turning--no matter the terrain.

The way it works sort of is that the smaller the rear gear, the harder to pedal, and the smaller the front gear, the easier to pedal ... for most hills you might astart in the middle ring up front and back, then shift down a little in the back as you get tired, then shift Up in the back(towards the larder, outside cog) a gear or two and Down in the front (to the smallest, inside ring.) Then as the hill stretches on, keep shifting Down (in the back (towards the inside, larger cogs) while staying ion the little ring up front.

In general (and everyone is an exception) you don't want to be spinning around so fast your are bouncing on the seat and you don't want to be pedaling so slowly and so hard you can barely push the pedals down. Most people would probably suggest 70-90 as a good cadence.

i'd guess (not knowing your exercise schedule or level of fitness) that you did pretty well for a first ride, and all you need is to keep riding.
Thank you! that makes a lot sense. I was bouncing around a bit earlier but last couple of days i realized i need to go to a bigger gear during climbs. I ride a nishiki Manitoba 2015 hybrid. nothing fancy but a good starter bike. I recently lost over 42 pounds and was running about 15-20 miles a week with some p90x3 workouts. I decided to add cycling since running was too hard on my knees after a year or so.
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Old 05-27-16, 08:36 PM
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Welcome to cycling! As someone who lost 50+ lbs through crossfit and running, then turned to cycling, I get where you're coming from. While your p90x and running background will definitely help you, cycling uses some different muscle groups and is taxing in a different way - especially when climbing. 10 miles on your first ride is a good start! Prepare for your butt to feel a little sore/bruised and for your legs to feel sore (especially going up stairs!). But, keep it up and those hills will get easier and easier. If you can get in a ride at least 2-3 times a week, you'll be surprised at how much better you feel in a month or two. You'll be able to stay in higher and higher gears as you climb, and your legs won't start burning nearly as fast. Suffer through the first bit, because it definitely gets better!

The great thing about being faster and stronger is that you'll get up those hills quicker. When you are new it's extra bad because not only do your legs and heart feel like they might explode, you are stuck pedaling in a low gear, going slow, which means you are suffering for even longer. But that's what it takes! Good work - keep it up!
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Old 05-27-16, 08:37 PM
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Nishiki Adult Manitoba Road Bike | DICK'S Sporting Goods

Good solid starter bike, good for anything you might want to do.

Congrats on the weight loss.
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Old 05-27-16, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Nishiki Adult Manitoba Road Bike | DICK'S Sporting Goods

Good solid starter bike, good for anything you might want to do.

Congrats on the weight loss.
Thank you!! i was beating myself up on this purchase but decided to move on, learn to ride on this and then invest in a solid road or cyclocross bike when i stick to riding for a 6 months to a year. So far i am enjoying it a lot!
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Old 05-27-16, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Cadence should be somewhere between 80 and 90.

Oh, and no way would you have burned 760 cal over 10 miles ... 10 miles = approx. 16 km. You probably burn about 100 cal/5 km = maybe just over 300 cal. If you're trying to lose weight, that might be something to keep in mind.
His/her cadence should be whatever it is. No one that green should be concerned about cadence, at all. So long as the pedals are turning, s/he's doing fine.

Further, OP could easily have burned that many calories. It doesn't indicate anywhere what he (she?) weighs, or if s/he has properly input their heart rate zones (which I doubt) but s/he averaged 158bpm. The spot from the screengrab is 12.3mph @ 165bpm. On flat ground. I don't want to say the OP is out of shape, but his (her?) cardio fitness level is quite low.

When I first got on the bike (not all that long ago, considering) I would have rides average in the high-150s to low-160s for HR, and get Strava-estimated calories burned of 800-1000 per hour. Of course, everyone on here told me, "No way you're burning that many calories-- try maybe 300-500 an hour." Well, now I have 300+ tracked rides, HR and PM, and guess what? Still burning (Strava-estimated) 800-1000 an hour on rides of typical duration and intensity. During tempo-paced rides, I manage 14-16 calories per minute.

I'm confident in the estimates, because I eat like a starving horse, and the weight still comes off, albeit very slowly now. Tough to restrict intake and ride 240 miles a week. So obviously, YMMV.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
His/her cadence should be whatever it is. No one that green should be concerned about cadence, at all. So long as the pedals are turning, s/he's doing fine.

Further, OP could easily have burned that many calories. It doesn't indicate anywhere what he (she?) weighs, or if s/he has properly input their heart rate zones (which I doubt) but s/he averaged 158bpm. The spot from the screengrab is 12.3mph @ 165bpm. On flat ground. I don't want to say the OP is out of shape, but his (her?) cardio fitness level is quite low.

When I first got on the bike (not all that long ago, considering) I would have rides average in the high-150s to low-160s for HR, and get Strava-estimated calories burned of 800-1000 per hour. Of course, everyone on here told me, "No way you're burning that many calories-- try maybe 300-500 an hour." Well, now I have 300+ tracked rides, HR and PM, and guess what? Still burning (Strava-estimated) 800-1000 an hour on rides of typical duration and intensity. During tempo-paced rides, I manage 14-16 calories per minute.

I'm confident in the estimates, because I eat like a starving horse, and the weight still comes off, albeit very slowly now. Tough to restrict intake and ride 240 miles a week. So obviously, YMMV.

I am 32/Male/192 pounds. just lost 42 pounds. I used to run 15-20 miles a week with 2 to 3 days of p90x3 or insanity workouts. Not a beachbody distributer my wife got me a garmin fenix 3 as a early fathers day gift and i just installed it 5 minutes before the ride. may be thats why the inaccurate data.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:49 PM
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When you say "used to," how far in the past are we talking? Cardio fitness level doesn't persist-- it's a use it or lose it thing. Even 3-4 months of inactivity and you're basically starting over.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
When you say "used to," how far in the past are we talking? Cardio fitness level doesn't persist-- it's a use it or lose it thing. Even 3-4 months of inactivity and you're basically starting over.
A week ago.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
When you say "used to," how far in the past are we talking? Cardio fitness level doesn't persist-- it's a use it or lose it thing. Even 3-4 months of inactivity and you're basically starting over.
I still do 2-3 days of p90x3 lifting and replaced running with riding.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:53 PM
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Then I don't know what to say about that. Unless your resting heart rate is like 125, or you were borderline dehydrated before getting on the bike, that HR level for the intensity of the activity is puzzling.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Then I don't know what to say about that. Unless your resting heart rate is like 125, or you were borderline dehydrated before getting on the bike, that HR level for the intensity of the activity is puzzling.
My Fenix 3 HR constantly shows my Resting HR is 55. I checked with a HRM strap with same data. I agree puzzels me too
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Old 05-27-16, 09:56 PM
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Maybe you just don't like heat.
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Old 05-27-16, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Maybe you just don't like heat.
LOL I LOVE the cold weather. May be you are right! I will work on practicing climbing hills except that i really enjoyed my ride. I am looking to reach 20 mile ride in a month
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Old 05-27-16, 10:03 PM
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New to Hills:

See how easy and slow you can go up one.

Start in your easiest gearing.

Sit up straight..Helps breathing.

Hands and arms in front of your body.

Do NOT look at the top of the hill while going up.

See How Slow you can go.

You can go faster in the future.
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Old 05-27-16, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
New to Hills:

See how easy and slow you can go up one.

Start in your easiest gearing.

Sit up straight..Helps breathing.

Hands and arms in front of your body.

Do NOT look at the top of the hill while going up.

See How Slow you can go.

You can go faster in the future.
Good input! that happened to me today exactly. i started looking at the end of the hill while climbing up and got so intimidated! My goal is to ride over 20 miles a day.
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Old 05-28-16, 06:26 AM
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There's no answer other than ride more. Do you have an indoor trainer?

I wouldn't mind seeing the Power numbers -- even Strava's estimated power numbers for the ride.

I mean if you're new to cycling and weigh 200 lbs (90kg) and putting out 200 Watts for 2 minutes to get up the hill, that can drain you to the point that you're at Max HR by the top and about to drop.
My first trip out when I got my bike, I made it 3 miles away, and had to stop to rest -- I thought I was going to have to walk my bike back...

I would head out once or twice a week, and always look to improve, but never really got anywhere.

I got the indoor trainer that has a power meter built in...and just started messing around on it. Eventually the power numbers made sense, and I could put in a solid hour and 15 miles of riding at a sustained effort of around 1.8-2.0 watts/kg. It took a while (like a month) of consistent riding, 4-5 days a week to get there. I got so used to training with power that I could pace myself easily...of course I don't have a power meter when outside, but I can use perceived rate of exertion there.

My very first group ride that I did online (Zwift), I joined one that was for "slow" people -- and I got dropped. I spent a couple of weeks just riding on my own (some days slow, some days pushing intervals, competing in sprints, etc)...One day I saw that group starting back up and I wasn't far from the starting line. I slowed down and waited for them. I left them behind pretty easily. So I waited up for them again, and did the same thing. This time I kept going until they were 8 minutes behind before finally losing track of them.

Now my heart rate was going like I was in an actual race. And I'm sure most of them were just putting along at 130 beats per minute, but that's not the point...I was making progress.

My point is, I guess, that you really need to just get out and ride. If doing a structured program inside, mixing it up is key. If you're outside, the hills and headwinds encountered will most likely take care of "mixing it up" for you.

--

Also, everyone's heart rates are so different...I wouldn't compare your heart rate to anyone's but your own. I watch the CAT A and CAT B races on Zwift (Nathan Guerra streams them and commentates) -- some guys will be at 140 while others are in the 170's. Some guys will max out at 181, some guys will hit 215 when pushing. So your 180 might be very different from someone else's 180. One thing's certain, when you're at or near max heart rate, as long as your heart is healthy, you will just run out of gas and not be able to push anymore -- it's not like you have to "risk" something by being near the max because your body just won't let you be there for too long (again assuming there's no underlying medical conditions). It's painful...that's why they call the indoor setups where your trainer is the "pain cave."

Good luck, and just ride more.
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Old 05-28-16, 07:07 AM
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I usually go thru an entire water bottle in 10-12 miles when the temperatures are high like you posted.
Protein shakes are great starters but as your distance increases you'll want carbs for energy. You'll still lose weight eating carbs. I carry a few Gu gels or a Hammer bar for longer rides. As your mileage increases you'll be able to determine how many gels or bars you'll want to take with you. I always take extra in case I decide to add a few extra miles to my rides.
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Old 05-28-16, 07:59 AM
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First 10 mile ride, building up your distance and effort the number one thing I can tell you is to go by feel. I'm not saying don't push yourself, because I think that's necessary, but don't feel like you have to complete a set distance. Keep it fluid, pain is not really necessary nor beneficial.

In your specific ride you had a good bit of climbing for starting out (don't let anyone tell you otherwise ) so I suspect that it would have helped to pace yourself more on the uphills. Right now the objective is to get over the hill, and don't worry about speed. If you're doing a lot of climbing from your perspective, don't worry about distance.

It also sounds like you might have gotten a little dehydrated. Even now it still surprises me how just a simple drink of water picks me up when I start dragging. But one caveat: if you let it go too long and are more than a bit dehydrated it doesn't seem to help, not right away. So it helps to stay on top of that.
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Old 05-28-16, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by nitroRoo View Post
Welcome to cycling! As someone who lost 50+ lbs through crossfit and running, then turned to cycling, I get where you're coming from. While your p90x and running background will definitely help you, cycling uses some different muscle groups and is taxing in a different way - especially when climbing. 10 miles on your first ride is a good start! Prepare for your butt to feel a little sore/bruised and for your legs to feel sore (especially going up stairs!). But, keep it up and those hills will get easier and easier. If you can get in a ride at least 2-3 times a week, you'll be surprised at how much better you feel in a month or two. You'll be able to stay in higher and higher gears as you climb, and your legs won't start burning nearly as fast. Suffer through the first bit, because it definitely gets better!

The great thing about being faster and stronger is that you'll get up those hills quicker. When you are new it's extra bad because not only do your legs and heart feel like they might explode, you are stuck pedaling in a low gear, going slow, which means you are suffering for even longer. But that's what it takes! Good work - keep it up!
For some reason i dint see this comment. Congrats on your weight loss too! Yes i realized its very different from crossfit/p90x workouts. its challenging me big time
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Old 05-28-16, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by deapee View Post
There's no answer other than ride more. Do you have an indoor trainer?

I wouldn't mind seeing the Power numbers -- even Strava's estimated power numbers for the ride.

I mean if you're new to cycling and weigh 200 lbs (90kg) and putting out 200 Watts for 2 minutes to get up the hill, that can drain you to the point that you're at Max HR by the top and about to drop.
My first trip out when I got my bike, I made it 3 miles away, and had to stop to rest -- I thought I was going to have to walk my bike back...

I would head out once or twice a week, and always look to improve, but never really got anywhere.

I got the indoor trainer that has a power meter built in...and just started messing around on it. Eventually the power numbers made sense, and I could put in a solid hour and 15 miles of riding at a sustained effort of around 1.8-2.0 watts/kg. It took a while (like a month) of consistent riding, 4-5 days a week to get there. I got so used to training with power that I could pace myself easily...of course I don't have a power meter when outside, but I can use perceived rate of exertion there.

My very first group ride that I did online (Zwift), I joined one that was for "slow" people -- and I got dropped. I spent a couple of weeks just riding on my own (some days slow, some days pushing intervals, competing in sprints, etc)...One day I saw that group starting back up and I wasn't far from the starting line. I slowed down and waited for them. I left them behind pretty easily. So I waited up for them again, and did the same thing. This time I kept going until they were 8 minutes behind before finally losing track of them.

Now my heart rate was going like I was in an actual race. And I'm sure most of them were just putting along at 130 beats per minute, but that's not the point...I was making progress.

My point is, I guess, that you really need to just get out and ride. If doing a structured program inside, mixing it up is key. If you're outside, the hills and headwinds encountered will most likely take care of "mixing it up" for you.

--

Also, everyone's heart rates are so different...I wouldn't compare your heart rate to anyone's but your own. I watch the CAT A and CAT B races on Zwift (Nathan Guerra streams them and commentates) -- some guys will be at 140 while others are in the 170's. Some guys will max out at 181, some guys will hit 215 when pushing. So your 180 might be very different from someone else's 180. One thing's certain, when you're at or near max heart rate, as long as your heart is healthy, you will just run out of gas and not be able to push anymore -- it's not like you have to "risk" something by being near the max because your body just won't let you be there for too long (again assuming there's no underlying medical conditions). It's painful...that's why they call the indoor setups where your trainer is the "pain cave."

Good luck, and just ride more.

Thank you! thats a lot of good information. I dont have a indoor trainer. I did not even know what it was and had to look it up. It looks like i would need that during the winter season so i can ride indoors. I agree i will keep riding!
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Old 05-28-16, 08:46 AM
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rs23
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Thanks i will look into those gels. I was doing intermittent fasting during my earlier rides and it was impossible to ride during my fasting window in the heat so i put that on hold for now

Originally Posted by RonH View Post
I usually go thru an entire water bottle in 10-12 miles when the temperatures are high like you posted.
Protein shakes are great starters but as your distance increases you'll want carbs for energy. You'll still lose weight eating carbs. I carry a few Gu gels or a Hammer bar for longer rides. As your mileage increases you'll be able to determine how many gels or bars you'll want to take with you. I always take extra in case I decide to add a few extra miles to my rides.
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