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on your left

Old 07-18-16, 12:02 AM
  #1  
Liz33
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on your left

I finally had the awesome experience of riding my bike on an actual bike trail. I saw many other bikers on the trail. I was going slower than basically everyone else in there so It was really nice whenever they would let me know that they were going to pass me on the left. I thanked everyone that said On your Left. Other bikers, however, never bothered to let me know.
Here is the thing, I wish I could let you know how important it is for a newbie like me to know that you are behind me and going to pass me. I don't know if those bikers assumed that I was looking at them because I have a useless mirror in my bike, but most of the time I never knew there was anybody behind me until right the moment they passed me. Or maybe they felt so confident and are so experienced that find it not necessary to say On your left or Ring a bell or something. Ok, you might be really confident, but I'm not! I could have easily steer to the left getting nervous or not knowing you were there and I can't imagine that type of accident. So anyway, I know that if you dont like letting others know that you are going to pass them, I won't change you now, but just letting you know that for some of us it really helps if you do. And for all of you who are kind and take a moment to let bikers like me know that you are passing, thank you.
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Old 07-18-16, 12:58 AM
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From another perspective ...

-- If it is a busy path we could be ringing a bell or calling "On your left" every few seconds ... and that would get old pretty quick.

-- Often when we do say "On your left" people swerve left, whether they are walking or cycling. They hear "Left" and that's the way they go. So we say, "On your left" in the hopes of warning people and end up dodging and weaving as they step or ride out in front of us.

-- And we don't assume that you see us in your mirror. We don't even notice if you have a mirror or not. We assume that you're going to hold your line ... or more accurately, we really hope you're going to hold your line because that's the polite and sensible thing for you to do. And we've been watching you from some distance back to try to determine your pattern of behaviour.


Personally, I will call out "Bicycles Back!" or "Bicycles Passing" if the person looks like they are going to weave and swerve all over the place.

On the weekend, I did this several times for families with small children because small children have the startling habit of suddenly riding across the cycleway right in front of on-coming bicycle traffic. I call out to warn their parents (and the children) for both my safety and that of the child.

I will also do that with people who seem to have difficulty holding their line from what I've observed from some distance back.

But if the person looks like they've got reasonable control of the bicycle, I won't bother calling out because I figure the person is unlikely to suddenly swerve into the next lane for no reason at all.


So if we don't call out, take it as a compliment ... we've been watching and we've made the judgement call that you seem to know what you're doing with the bicycle.
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Old 07-18-16, 02:11 AM
  #3  
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Oh and also ... so many people wear ear buds or headphones or whatever when they walk or ride that even if you do ring your bell or yell, they don't hear you. So sometimes we just give up.
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Old 07-18-16, 02:59 AM
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I don't have much experience on bike trails, but I think it's the same as other cycling traffic. Act predictable and trust the cyclist behind you with full view of the situation to judge it right. If your not supposed to react to the fact there's a cyclist behind you, you don't need to know.
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Old 07-18-16, 03:29 AM
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I slow and call out "on your left" to everyone I pass, common courtesy.
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Old 07-18-16, 04:14 AM
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Incidentally, this is what I'm thinking of when I think "actual bike trail" ... so when I'm riding, I'm hoping that other cyclists will stay on the correct side of the line. Or if the trails don't have lines, then I'm hoping that the other cyclists will stay far enough over to leave room for me to go by.






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Old 07-18-16, 04:39 AM
  #7  
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The rail trails around here come with a printed set of "courtesy" rules. They include that everyone -- pedestrian, walker, roller blader, whomever -- stay to the right; if in a group, proceed in a single file; and call out or ring a bell when passing others. Few groups follow the single file rule; many walkers insist on going against traffic; dog owners decide the leash law doesn't apply to their pet; some cyclists can't be bothered announcing their passing. To my mind, all such behavior is rude, given the posted etiquette and local ordinances. I do find MUPs often more trouble than they are worth for cycling, but the right thing to do in that case is stay off the MUP. Or so it seems to me.

Last edited by tclune; 07-18-16 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 07-18-16, 04:50 AM
  #8  
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I am glad you had an awesome experience on your Trail Ride. I would suggest you find a better mirror.

Approaching a person from behind while riding a trail and even on the road, I ring the bell and say...."PASSING ON YOUR LEFT." I include the word "passing" to further clarify what will be happening as I approach the individual. "On your left" can be meaningless to a new trail user.
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Old 07-18-16, 05:07 AM
  #9  
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on your left
Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
I slow and call out "on your left" to everyone I pass, common courtesy.
My call-out is “Coming up,” or when farther away, just “Yo,” and then I prepare for the response. Many similar threads about passing note that often the pedestrian (or slower cyclist) may be confused, and actually move left.

I have a mental “Golden Rule, “Do unto the pedestrians (or slower cyclists, skateborders,dogs, children), as you would have the cagers (motorists) do unto you.” So when passing a pedestrian, I slow down and move wide, and just like being passed by a car, a (friendly) toot of the horn is nice, but not expected, as long as the pass is respectful of me.

BTW, a hearty "Yo," is my greeting to oncoming cyclists, when it would be inopportune to wave. IMO it shows camaraderie, and I'm not slighted when a greeting is not returned (probably the other rider is out of breath).

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-18-16 at 05:14 AM.
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Old 07-18-16, 05:36 AM
  #10  
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Buy a better mirror if you're so freaked out about people passing you.....
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Old 07-18-16, 05:42 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Personally, I will call out "Bicycles Back!" or "Bicycles Passing" if the person looks like they are going to weave and swerve all over the place.

Yep. I just yell passing if the pedestrian is over center or the bike is swerving too much. Do with it what you will.
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Old 07-18-16, 05:55 AM
  #12  
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Machka made several good points, esp the ear bud part..... many wear these and listen to music which does not allow them to hear you and then they get spooked when you pass them.

Many people hear "on your left" and move left and so a bell is usually a better warning device. The bell just let's them know that you are there and intend to pass them. Most people will gravitate to the sides when they hear a bell, at least once they have had a little exposure to using the trails.

Sharing trails like that means offering some courtesies and exercising patience. If you go out for a ride on any multi use path, remember, it's not a race so why rush the ride. If you want to go fast, ride somewhere less crowded for everyone's safety.
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Old 07-18-16, 05:57 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Liz33 View Post
........ I could have easily steer to the left getting nervous or not knowing you were there and I can't imagine that type of accident.....
I don't know if you intend that to be some sort of veiled threat.... or if you're actually admitting that you aren't competent to be on the paths? Either way.... stop it!

If you really don't have the skills needed to safely share the public bicycle paths... stay off them till your skills improve. Our children use those paths! What is going through your mind? Ride an empty parking lot on a Sunday till you learn how to ride without wobbling.

If you think threating other people is a good idea.... staying home may be a better idea.
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Old 07-18-16, 06:28 AM
  #14  
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I used to call out "ON YOUR LEFT" but after a few walkers immediately jump to their left when they hear that, I just use the element of surprise in my passes.

PS I don't think he's threatening anyone -- We all drift when we think we're alone or when we're approaching a hovering wasp or something. I get what he was saying. Personally, I only pass people at just above the speed they're going anyway (most of the time).
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Old 07-18-16, 06:53 AM
  #15  
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See, this... THIS is why I stay off paths. Actually, it's the same on roads except the skill level tends to be a very tiny bit higher on the road. A lot of paths have rules about warning others before passing. So on paths, I give warnings and have to contend with about half of them acting like squirrels and unpredictably leaping all over the path when they hear my voice.

But on the road, there is no such requirement, and I only call out if it looks like the person I'm about to pass may do something potentially dangerous/stupid. Otherwise, it's best to give them 3 feet and don't let them know I'm there until I'm in front of them.
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Old 07-18-16, 06:53 AM
  #16  
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I find that to be key. Announcing and slowing down to pass.But a lot of walkers and joggers around here wear earbuds and have music cranked. So I rarely ride a trail during weekends and certain times of the mornings. But I do call out when I come up. I scared a jogger once, as I announced 3 to 4 times and she still jogged down the middle. Finally I go around and she jumped! Fortunately not into my way but she was startled.
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Old 07-18-16, 06:57 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Liz33 View Post
I don't know if those bikers assumed that I was looking at them because I have a useless mirror in my bike, but most of the time I never knew there was anybody behind me until right the moment they passed me.
Get a useful mirror; use it!
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Old 07-18-16, 06:58 AM
  #18  
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You should simply expect people to pass you and thus not do anything stupid like swerve or do a u turn. And if you get freaked out on a trail just imagine how you will feel on the road, where no one motorist is going to say anything when they pass you.
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Old 07-18-16, 07:24 AM
  #19  
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@Machka is 100% spot-on with her comments. OP, the best thing you can do while riding your bike in the world is to develop a sense of situational awareness. Know that when you are on a bike path, there will be other cyclists. At your stage, it sounds like you're being passed a lot. Expect that to happen, assume someone is behind you always. Because you are slower, ride as far right as possible, to make passing on the left easier. Hold your line, which means don't veer from side to side. In a parking lot or elsewhere that's not on the bike path, learn to glance over your shoulder without veering your bike to one side, and until you can, get a useful mirror. Remember since people are coming up behind you on the bike path to ideally not stop suddenly on the path or at all, unless there's room to pull off to one side.

I only sometimes call "on your left" because it causes so many people to veer left. Instead I either say nothing except good morning as I pass, or if I really need the other person/people to be aware of my presence, I will call out "heads up!" from far enough back that they can turn, look, and decide where to move themselves- I only do this is the person is occupying the path such that I cannot pass- riding or walking abreast with others, walking a dog, or running/cycling right on the center line, preventing a pass because of oncoming traffic.

My other comment is that from reading here on BF, I get the impression that lots of newbies assume other cyclists have some opinion of them as they ride by- that a lack of greeting should be perceived as an insult, or that not saying 'on your left' is so rude that it should be taken as a sign of disrespect. Abandon all of those thoughts, that kind of stuff alienates you from other cyclists and is completely untrue. They are enjoying their ride just like you are. Eventually you'll want cycling friends to ride with, don't be one of those people who sees a slight in everything and as a result winds up riding solo forever.
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Old 07-18-16, 07:48 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
I don't know if you intend that to be some sort of veiled threat.... or if you're actually admitting that you aren't competent to be on the paths? Either way.... stop it!

If you really don't have the skills needed to safely share the public bicycle paths... stay off them till your skills improve. Our children use those paths! What is going through your mind? Ride an empty parking lot on a Sunday till you learn how to ride without wobbling.

If you think threating other people is a good idea.... staying home may be a better idea.
I'm sorry Dave that you read that as a possible threat, that is definitely not what I meant. Also, I think I'm very capable of riding on a bike trail and share the road with other cyclists. That's why I waited two weeks practicing somewhere else before going there, so I agree with you in your valid point. However, if I can't see you coming behind me, and I don't hear you, an accident can happen. In more than one ocasiones I steered a little to the left, not because I don't know how to ride, and not because I was doing it on purpose to scare or hit anybody. It just happened for whatever reason and sure, if by mistake I hit anybody I'm going to be the guilty one, the dummy that didn't know how to ride, when in fact maybe it could have been prevented by the other cyclists letting me know he was passing me. I think that part of knowing how to share the road with others is just not handling well the bike, but having good manners with those riding in the same road.

Last edited by Liz33; 07-18-16 at 08:02 AM.
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Old 07-18-16, 07:50 AM
  #21  
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Pretty much what Machka said.

I'd invest in a better mirror and check it often also. I'm a jumpy person so I have to see what's coming behind me. I use a cat eye road bar end mirror and can see really well and far behind me. I think one should stay aware of their surroundings at all times, no different than driving a vehicle. I don't want to get in others way or cause an accident or rely on someone telling me they're coming by...so I use a mirror and practiced keeping my line, and I observe everything happening around me. I even read about road\mup safety\etiquette before venturing out the first time lol

Our mup has no lines and no guidelines\rules posted. I tend to announce "passing on your left" when needed. If I see they hold their line well then I'll just slow to roughly around their speed, a bit faster, and pass wide. I had watched a man for awhile before coming up and passing and he was all over the place. I slowed and loudly announced I was going to pass and he moved over and thanked me. First person to thank me...most ignore me or probably don't hear because of their headphones.

Last edited by Hardrock23; 07-18-16 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 07-18-16, 07:52 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
From another perspective ...
Thank you for explaining this. I see your point too
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Old 07-18-16, 07:56 AM
  #23  
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This is something I have had to teach my kids and their friends on trail riding. One of my sons friends, when I tell him on your left, the kid goes left, had to teach him, no that means I'm passing you on the left.

One time I was riding a rail trail, a guy yelled out on your left to me, and it scared the bejessis out of me. I had thought I was the only one on the rail trail in that vicinity at the time and didn't realize someone was behind me. This also could make someone jump a bit and first reactions are going to left a bit when you are already all the way to the right of the trail. Might be time to get a mirror.
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Old 07-18-16, 07:56 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Liz33 View Post
However, if I can't see you coming behind me, and I don't hear you, an accident can happen. In more than one ocasiones I steered a little to the left, not because I don't know how to ride, and not because I was doing it on purpose to scare or hit anybody. It just happened for whatever reason and sure, if by mistake I hit anybody I'm going to be the guilty one, the dummy that didn't know how to ride, when in fact maybe it could have been prevented by the other cyclists letting me know he was passing me. I think that part of knowing how to share the road with others is just not handling well the bike, but having good manners with those riding in the same road.
The thing is ... when a faster cyclist passes you, chances are that cyclist has been watching how you ride. If you look at all wobbly, we'll give you room because we don't want to be hit. We'll also give you room if you are riding quite slowly because slow cyclists tend to be more wobbly ... slow cyclists are also the ones who suddenly pull u-turns right in front of everyone.

When we pass you, we do have our eyes on the situation and we're prepared to take evasive action.

And if we're going fast enough, we'll only be beside you for a second or two and will, hopefully, be out of the way before you've got time to swerve or wobble.

Remember, if they don't say anything, they're fairly confident in your ability ... it's a complement.
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Old 07-18-16, 08:07 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Liz33 View Post
I wish I could let you know how important it is for a newbie like me to know that you are behind me and going to pass me. I don't know if those bikers assumed that I was looking at them because I have a useless mirror in my bike, but most of the time I never knew there was anybody behind me until right the moment they passed me.
In Wisconsin, at least, it is The Law that cyclists give an audible warning before overtaking other people on a bike path. That is not consistently done and even less consistently enforced is another matter.

That people may react unpredictably when they hear the warning is irrelevant; if you're on a path, you should adjust your speed down when overtaking and give your warning far enough in advance that you can take evasive action if needed. A bike path is not the place to try to set a personal best speed record.

As for the people with earbuds, engrossed in Pokemon Go, etc., all you can do is do your part to ride responsibly ride in a manner that doesn't put you or others at risk.
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