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Still confused about Cycling Shoes

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Old 07-25-16, 06:14 PM
  #1  
DreamRider85
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Still confused about Cycling Shoes

I'm looking to get cycling shoes for my road bike. But people wrote that I need to get clipless pedals too. Do I need to also get clipless pedals?

If I don't get clipless pedals, will it still be better to get cycling shoes?

And if I get clipless pedals, how do I install them and take the other pedals off?

Just really confused what to do.
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Old 07-25-16, 06:16 PM
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You don't need to get clipless unless you're ready to give them a try.
Cycling shoes have a stiffer sole so they don't flex when you're riding. You'll notice the difference.
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Old 07-25-16, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by RonH View Post
You don't need to get clipless unless you're ready to give them a try.
Cycling shoes have a stiffer sole so they don't flex when you're riding. You'll notice the difference.


Do I need clips? Are mountain bike shoes good for road bikes? They are supposed to be easier to walk with.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:09 PM
  #4  
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Do I need clips? Are mountain bike shoes good for road bikes? They are supposed to be easier to walk with.
Regular platform pedals are fine to start with. You can use platform pedals with toe clips.

Mountain bike shoes may be a great place to start. You can walk easily in mountain bike shoes. As noted bike shoes will have a stiffer sole that will be more comfortable to ride for longer periods of time.

To help with the terms let me describe some of your options.

The most basic pedal is the platform pedal. This is the same type of pedal you would expect to find on a kids bike or the like.

Toe clips or clips and slaps enhance a platform pedal by adding a a toe clip to guide your foot into position and a strap that can secure tour foot to the pedal.

Clipless pedals provide a mechanical connection to lock your shoes and pedal together. These clipless pedals require matched bike shoes for mounting a cleat that clicks into the clipless pedals.

Clipless pedals are commonly grouped into either a two- or three-bolt variety. Two-bolt is generally used for mountain bikes while the three bolt is used on road bikes.

The two bolt pedals are more user friendly as the shoes are easier to walk in and the pedals are often double sided making entry easier.

Hope this helps.
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Old 07-25-16, 07:45 PM
  #5  
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I started with toe clips back in the 70's. Back then we nailed a "cleat" to the bottom of the leather bike shoe and you didn't come out of the pedal. A good and a bad thing.

Roll the clock ahead to the 80's and I was running look pedals and clipless cleats on my new Diadora road shoes. Awesome!

Roll the clock ahead to now. I am running Giro mountain bike shoes (that actually look, ride and feel like road shoes) with SPD-type Shimano XT pedals.

Wow!! All of the benefits of running road shoes and clipless pedals but I can also use them mountain biking and walking around. You can't really walk in pure road shoes.

I think this is the best set-up for 99% of the road riders out there. I won't be going back to pure road shoes probably for ever since these shoes are comfortable and effective. Technology has come a long way in 30 years, heck, a long way in just 10 years. The SPD pedal system really is excellent.

As far as using clipless pedals for the first time, don't be intimidated. They are easy to get used to. My 14 year old son tried them this past weekend and took to them right away after a couple of wobbly dismounts in the parking lot.

Last edited by drlogik; 07-25-16 at 07:49 PM.
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Old 07-25-16, 08:25 PM
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Hey guys, if you don't have anything positive to say, don't say anything. Otherwise it's called harassment.
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Old 07-25-16, 09:09 PM
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Pedal Installation and Removal | Park Tool
Try not to be confused.
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Old 07-25-16, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Do I need clips? Are mountain bike shoes good for road bikes? They are supposed to be easier to walk with.
MTB cleats are smaller and easier to walk in.


Personally, I prefer road pedals, either Look or Shimano, on my road bike. On my commuting/touring bike I like MTB pedals. I use Sidi shoes on both.


To answer your original questions, you normally match both shoes and pedals together so road shoe/road pedal, MTB shoe/MTB pedal, regular shoe/platform pedal.


To change pedals, buy a pedal wrench. Even if you only use it once, tools are always good to have.
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Old 07-25-16, 09:26 PM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by GP View Post
To answer your original questions, you normally match both shoes and pedals together so road shoe/road pedal, MTB shoe/MTB pedal, regular shoe/platform pedal.
I'd make the decision based on the type of riding that I planned to do.

I'm basically a restaurant-to restaurant rider so I use SPD pedals with mountain bike shoes almost all of the time. My beater bike has double sided pedals so, for quick trips to the convenience store, I can also hop on it wearing whatever shoes that I happen to have on.
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Old 07-25-16, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by GP View Post
To change pedals, buy a pedal wrench. Even if you only use it once, tools are always good to have.
Interestingly, the most recent couple sets of Wellgo pedals I've had had plenty of flat width for a normal 15mm wrench. Granted, it was the thinnest one in the $1 bucket at the pawn shop, but no binding up between the crank arm and pedal body.

For the OP, look around on Amazon, Nashbar and Niagara Cycles and find some cheap pedals of each style. Try them out and see what you like, then decide if you want to upgrade each type.

My personal cheap pedal preferences:
Flats: WalMart. Whatever's under $10. Paying a premium for flats is like buying a turbocharged custom Yugo.
Clip and strap: Origin8 Sport Road Pedal. $20 at Niagara. No special shoes needed, and a good backup for clipless.
Clipless: Wellgo WPD-823. $30 at Niagara or WalMart site-to-store. You'll need SPD compatible shoes. Back the tension way down before clipping in the first time, as they come set pretty tight. (Don't forget to adjust both sides of both pedals.)

For the shoes, browse around for SPD mountain shoes. You should be able to find a closeout you like the looks of in your size for $50 or less. If you decide against clipless, they're still better in the clip and strap than normal shoes, so nice to have for longer rides.

Originally Posted by BillyD View Post
Hey guys, if you don't have anything positive to say, don't say anything. Otherwise it's called harassment.
That's not a very positive thing to say.
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Old 07-25-16, 10:22 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by ahanulec View Post
Regular platform pedals are fine to start with. You can use platform pedals with toe clips.

Mountain bike shoes may be a great place to start. You can walk easily in mountain bike shoes. As noted bike shoes will have a stiffer sole that will be more comfortable to ride for longer periods of time.

To help with the terms let me describe some of your options.

The most basic pedal is the platform pedal. This is the same type of pedal you would expect to find on a kids bike or the like.

Toe clips or clips and slaps enhance a platform pedal by adding a a toe clip to guide your foot into position and a strap that can secure tour foot to the pedal.

Clipless pedals provide a mechanical connection to lock your shoes and pedal together. These clipless pedals require matched bike shoes for mounting a cleat that clicks into the clipless pedals.

Clipless pedals are commonly grouped into either a two- or three-bolt variety. Two-bolt is generally used for mountain bikes while the three bolt is used on road bikes.

The two bolt pedals are more user friendly as the shoes are easier to walk in and the pedals are often double sided making entry easier.

Hope this helps.

So if I just use the standard pedals and wear mountain bike shoes, I will notice a difference in my stride?

If yes, what is the reason? Just because of the sole?
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Old 07-25-16, 11:27 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by KD5NRH View Post
Interestingly, the most recent couple sets of Wellgo pedals I've had had plenty of flat width for a normal 15mm wrench. Granted, it was the thinnest one in the $1 bucket at the pawn shop, but no binding up between the crank arm and pedal body.

For the OP, look around on Amazon, Nashbar and Niagara Cycles and find some cheap pedals of each style. Try them out and see what you like, then decide if you want to upgrade each type.

My personal cheap pedal preferences:
Flats: WalMart. Whatever's under $10. Paying a premium for flats is like buying a turbocharged custom Yugo.
Clip and strap: Origin8 Sport Road Pedal. $20 at Niagara. No special shoes needed, and a good backup for clipless.
Clipless: Wellgo WPD-823. $30 at Niagara or WalMart site-to-store. You'll need SPD compatible shoes. Back the tension way down before clipping in the first time, as they come set pretty tight. (Don't forget to adjust both sides of both pedals.)

For the shoes, browse around for SPD mountain shoes. You should be able to find a closeout you like the looks of in your size for $50 or less. If you decide against clipless, they're still better in the clip and strap than normal shoes, so nice to have for longer rides.



That's not a very positive thing to say.
I will call your Wellgo pedal, and raise you with this: Shimano PD-M520 Clipless Pedal > Components > Pedals > Mountain Pedals | Jenson USA
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Old 07-25-16, 11:39 PM
  #13  
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These pedals look good for learning to use clipless: Shimano PD-M424 Pedals > Components > Pedals > Mountain Pedals | Jenson USA
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Old 07-26-16, 12:28 AM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
I started with toe clips back in the 70's. Back then we nailed a "cleat" to the bottom of the leather bike shoe and you didn't come out of the pedal. A good and a bad thing.

Roll the clock ahead to the 80's and I was running look pedals and clipless cleats on my new Diadora road shoes. Awesome!

Roll the clock ahead to now. I am running Giro mountain bike shoes (that actually look, ride and feel like road shoes) with SPD-type Shimano XT pedals.

Wow!! All of the benefits of running road shoes and clipless pedals but I can also use them mountain biking and walking around. You can't really walk in pure road shoes.

I think this is the best set-up for 99% of the road riders out there. I won't be going back to pure road shoes probably for ever since these shoes are comfortable and effective. Technology has come a long way in 30 years, heck, a long way in just 10 years. The SPD pedal system really is excellent.

As far as using clipless pedals for the first time, don't be intimidated. They are easy to get used to. My 14 year old son tried them this past weekend and took to them right away after a couple of wobbly dismounts in the parking lot.
What is an SPD Pedal? Are you telling me to go clipless? I'm just confused. I also ready that clipless was dangerous because you might need to get off the bike real fast.
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Old 07-26-16, 01:32 AM
  #15  
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Buddy, you sound like a troll.

Anyway look at this video, it might help.
Wish i knew that Shimano M cleats existed they would save me falling for a few times.

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Old 07-26-16, 01:45 AM
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Originally Posted by bicikleto View Post
Buddy, you sound like a troll.

Anyway look at this video, it might help.
Wish i knew that Shimano M cleats existed they would save me falling for a few times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJBEkKK5liY


I'm not a troll. But is this the shoe I should get? Do I need to change pedals?
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Old 07-26-16, 02:12 AM
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This are road specific shoes (the sole is usually more stiffer and they have 3 holes), but you can mount both cleats - 2 hole or 3 hole ones.


Those are MTB shoes, and you can only mount 2 hole cleats(SPD) and nothing else or you can manufacture an adapter.


Those are SPD pedals. (2 hole ones)


The above pedals use SPD cleats


Those are road style pedals or better - 3 hole cleat pedals


On the left are 3 hole cleats and on the right are the 2 hole cleats. As you can see, the right shoe has a grove in the middle which helps you to walk as a normal person as you walk on the shoe and not on the cleat.


To mount the pedals you need a 15mm wrench


_______________________________________

Noe to answer your question you have to look what you have and just put the puzzle together
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Old 07-26-16, 04:03 AM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
What is an SPD Pedal? Are you telling me to go clipless? I'm just confused. I also ready that clipless was dangerous because you might need to get off the bike real fast.
I wouldn't say clipless are dangerous. I wouldn't ride without them, my riding is all road. I bought my first set when they came out in the 80's. You do have to think ahead to give yourself enough time to get off the pedal. Once you have the tension set correctly, it's pretty easy to quickly remove your foot. It becomes second nature to clip in and out.

It all comes down to what you feel comfortable with.
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Old 07-26-16, 04:05 AM
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Originally Posted by bicikleto View Post
This are road specific shoes (the sole is usually more stiffer and they have 3 holes), but you can mount both cleats - 2 hole or 3 hole ones.


Those are MTB shoes, and you can only mount 2 hole cleats(SPD) and nothing else or you can manufacture an adapter.


Those are SPD pedals. (2 hole ones)


The above pedals use SPD cleats


Those are road style pedals or better - 3 hole cleat pedals


On the left are 3 hole cleats and on the right are the 2 hole cleats. As you can see, the right shoe has a grove in the middle which helps you to walk as a normal person as you walk on the shoe and not on the cleat.


To mount the pedals you need a 15mm wrench


_______________________________________

Noe to answer your question you have to look what you have and just put the puzzle together

Thanks for using pictures to explain everything. So if I just study this, then I just have to figure out where to buy all these things right?
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Old 07-26-16, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Thanks for using pictures to explain everything. So if I just study this, then I just have to figure out where to buy all these things right?
It took me awhile to get all of this sorted as well. What was what, what worked with what, etc...

What helped was seeing everything. I looked at YouTube videos where they showed different shoes and different pedals, how they worked, the different types, etc. I also went into my bike store and looked at all the shoes and the pedals and asked an employee questions. If you have a local bike store, visit them!

I ended up buying some toe clips to start off with - the cage and strap that hooks to a regular pedal, that can be used with regular shoes. I'm moving on to clipless next and decided on MTB shoes and MTB pedals.
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Old 07-26-16, 06:18 AM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Do I need clips? Are mountain bike shoes good for road bikes? They are supposed to be easier to walk with.
Mountain biking shoes usually can not handle typical road cleats (Look, Time, Shimano road cleats, etc), and besides, they look ridiculous on a road bike.
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Old 07-26-16, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Hardrock23 View Post
It took me awhile to get all of this sorted as well. What was what, what worked with what, etc...

What helped was seeing everything. I looked at YouTube videos where they showed different shoes and different pedals, how they worked, the different types, etc. I also went into my bike store and looked at all the shoes and the pedals and asked an employee questions. If you have a local bike store, visit them!

I ended up buying some toe clips to start off with - the cage and strap that hooks to a regular pedal, that can be used with regular shoes. I'm moving on to clipless next and decided on MTB shoes and MTB pedals.
Start with this: Shimano multi release as seen in the video that was posted above
Shimano SH56 Cleats | Chain Reaction Cycles

If you wont sprint IMO there isnt a need for "normal" cleats at all, but thats just me.
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Old 07-26-16, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
I'm looking to get cycling shoes for my road bike. But people wrote that I need to get clipless pedals too. Do I need to also get clipless pedals?

If I don't get clipless pedals, will it still be better to get cycling shoes?

And if I get clipless pedals, how do I install them and take the other pedals off?

Just really confused what to do.
Where did you buy your road bike? Where do you get your road bike serviced?
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Old 07-26-16, 06:57 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Thanks for using pictures to explain everything. So if I just study this, then I just have to figure out where to buy all these things right?
One thing to note: the pedals shown, and many others, do not use a 15mm wrench for installation and removal. They use a large metric Allen wrench, in the end of the axle, usually 8mm or 10mm. Some pedals accommodate both tool types, but some do not.

You can buy all these things on Amazon, or at your LBS. The LBS will probably have a smaller selection, but much better service, and can help you position the cleats on your shoes, and show you how to install and adjust the pedals. They'll, also, have the tools you'll need. Take your bike, and go see them. Bring your credit card. Bike shops are fun places!
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Old 07-26-16, 07:19 AM
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My advice would be to start with mountain bike or "city" cycling shoes. They are easier to walk in than road shoes and function just as well. You don't have to start using pedals with cleats until you're ready for that step. Various types of cleated pedals will work with mtn bike/ city shoes but SPDs are most common and generally the least expensive. SPDs are also very reliable and last forever.

Almost all of my cycling is on roads and greenways and I switched to SPDs pedals and shoes a long time ago. SPD shoes are not dorky for road riding and lots of road cyclists use them because they are easier to walk in and function just as well. Very few people would even notice that you are wearing mtn bike shoes with many brands/models such as Sidi Dominators.

I switched to SPDs because about half of my cycling is while commuting. Regular road pedals and shoes are a royal pain if you are riding on urban streets and having to stop at a lot of traffic signals. Road shoes also are a hassle to walk in.
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