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Needle on floor pump constantly creeps clockwise

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Needle on floor pump constantly creeps clockwise

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Old 07-28-16, 11:58 PM
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Gaelen
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Needle on floor pump constantly creeps clockwise

I have an awesome Cannondale floor pump. I dropped a tool directly on the psi gauge and now the needle won't move backwards to zero. It used to just be skewed, but, now the needle moves forward after every single pump. I wasn't too worried about it until recently having trouble popping tubes. I understand this may be from under inflation as I'm a little heavy for 700x23. I can't find anything on repairing an air pump or anything on the Cannondale site relating to air pumps.

I bought the pump a couple years ago so I doubt there's a warranty deal here. Does anybody have experience fixing these gauges or should I replace and be more careful?
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Old 07-29-16, 12:12 AM
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Probably easier to buy a handheld gauge than repair or replace the gauge on the floor pump. This Nashbar dual gauge works well enough for $8.
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Old 07-29-16, 06:02 AM
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Buy a handheld gauge as canklecat suggests. I have a Silca floor where the gauge is not as accurate as I would like (being 30 years old). I could replace it but why bother when a handheld works well.
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Old 07-29-16, 07:26 AM
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Buy a handheld gauge, or buy a new pump (I far prefer NOT having to switch between pump and gauge) and relegate the old one to spare usage. Neither option costs that much, and is far preferable to dealing with blown tires when you'd rather be riding. I keep an old pump in my car trunk for quick and easy topoffs, using the oh so scientific pinch method, at the trailhead.
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Old 07-29-16, 07:32 AM
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corrado33
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My $15 wal-mart "schwinn" pump has lasted me 4 years of daily commuting and riding. And the gauge is within a few psi of accurate. (Accurate enough that I don't care.)
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Old 07-29-16, 08:53 AM
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If you can disassemble the check valve, you might see if there's something slightly off there. I've had pumps where the pressure really did creep after each stroke. Cleaning and lubing the valve usually fixed it.
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Old 07-29-16, 09:09 AM
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indyfabz
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Shouldn't the needle move forward after every pump?
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Old 07-29-16, 09:38 AM
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You may be able to remove and replace the gauge, although I wouldn't expect any help or parts from Cannondale. Pressure gauges are a common industrial part. If you can match the connector type and pressure range, you don't need one specifically for a bicycle pump. Or you could potentially mount a pressure gauge inline with the hose.

Post pics, or at the very least a specific model name, and we might be able to help you eyeball it.

...or, as mentioned above, just use a handheld gauge.
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Old 07-29-16, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Shouldn't the needle move forward after every pump?
Yes, but, it never completely goes back to zero, always forward. It's currently sitting over the "i" in psi, so, I guess I'll take it apart when I'm a little more motivated today and see if I can see anything.
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Old 07-29-16, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Gaelen View Post
Yes, but, it never completely goes back to zero, always forward. It's currently sitting over the "i" in psi, so, I guess I'll take it apart when I'm a little more motivated today and see if I can see anything.
Sounds like the spring moving the needle back to 0 is borked. I'd suggest taking the meter apart if possible, but it's likely filled with tiny bits which go SPROING! and you never see them again.
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Old 07-30-16, 02:59 PM
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Yar, it's buggered. Nothing comes apart even after removing all the screws. Cheapie Schwinn pump here I come.
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Old 07-30-16, 07:30 PM
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For a few dollars more than a Schwinn pump you can buy a Nashbar Earl Grey or other Nashbar floor pump. They're solidly made.
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Old 07-31-16, 09:07 AM
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Search online. You should find a good pump cheap. I would stick with a reputable name brand.
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Old 07-31-16, 12:22 PM
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Dont need no stinkin pressure guage. A well trained thumb and forefinger will get you within 5psi of the real pressure.

For many years all i had was a Silca frame pump with no guage. Between ride feel and thumb checking i got the right pressure every time.
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Old 07-31-16, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
Dont need no stinkin pressure guage. A well trained thumb and forefinger will get you within 5psi of the real pressure.

For many years all i had was a Silca frame pump with no guage. Between ride feel and thumb checking i got the right pressure every time.
Potential drawback to this is that the OP is heavy by his own admission and riding 23s. That leaves a narrow margin between too much pressure and pinch flats.

The feeler gauge technique served me very well for decades (and still does) but I was running sewups that tolerate pinches far better and weighed 145 pounds (and still <160). Now, 24s are my smallest tire. (I won't own a bike that won't take 25s and full fenders.)

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Old 07-31-16, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
Search online. You should find a good pump cheap. I would stick with a reputable name brand.

I'll just clarify, that Sadly ' Big X-Mart Box ' store " Schwinn ", is no longer considered a Reputable Name Brand by many on these forums, including this most humbled commenter.
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Old 07-31-16, 05:59 PM
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There are two common causes of your problem, both relatively easy to fix, if you can remove the gauge crystal (lens). Either the shock moved the ratcher and pinion one tooth position with respect to each other, or the needle is loose on the pin.

On most (MOST, nor all) dial gauges needles mount to the pin with a taper fit. Remove the crystal and grab the needles hub between two finger nails and try to lift it off. If you succeed, you now need to pump to a known pressure near the middle of the scale (ie. 80psi for a 0-160psi gauge), and gently press the needle home. Don't force it yet, because you may want to remove it anew. Gently bleed out the line so the needle doesn't bump the zero peg hard, then repeat the pump and compare process to check you calibration. This install the needle to match a known pressure is how the gauge was built in the first place and is the best way to recalibrate a damaged one. Once you have it dialed in, tap the needle gently to set the hub securely on the pin.

As I said, sometimes the rack slips one tooth, and there's a shortcut fix. Gently flex the end of needle up, and over the zero post. Then wind it backward slowly until you hear the click of the pinion slipping one tooth at the end of the rack. Now east it back and it should zero out slightly to the left of the post. If so, flex it and bring it over and park it to the right, and you're done. Often this results in a gauge that seems to work fine, but may be off a few psi because the internals were brought past the design limit, but the gauge will work fine and give consistent readings.

So I hope this helps and wish you luck.

BTW - like the others, I prefer to rely on a hand gauge to be sure, I find floor pump gauges far faster and more convenient, even if it's not accurate. My floor pump gauge reads about 5psi high mid scale (proven against a master gauge), but it's no issue, I simply factor that when pumping and pump to about 5psi less than I rally want.
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