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Old 08-01-16, 11:44 AM
  #1  
thejohnpratt
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Newbie

Alright, I just moved to a new apartment for college and it's too close to campus for driving, but too far to walk. I feel like a bike is the perfect solution, but I have no idea where to start. So, before going to a local shop and waste my money, I thought I would come here for suggestions on where to look. I'm happy to answer any other questions you need in order to make good recommendations, but I'm going to to try and hit all the big questions in this post.

- I'm male, 5' 9", 5'10" on a good day, and weigh around 135.

- I live in Columbia, South Carolina. Some hills are pretty steep, but they only last a block or so. Most of the undulation is subtle, especially on campus where I will be most of the time. I do have to deal with multiple sets of train tracks, however, depending on where I need to go.

- I'm not looking to ride competitively or over long distances. The farthest I would want to / need to ride is around 5 miles in one direction, and even that is pushing it.

- Weight is somewhat of an issue, considering I live on the 3rd floor of my complex. Doesn't need to be carbon fibre or anything extreme though.

- I really am into the "hipster" city bike look. Simple frame without many logos, bullhorn or drop bars, a little saddle bag behind the seat.

I've attached some websites that have pictures of the style I'm into so you can take a look. My budget is $500 and under, unless something really awesome is around $600 - I can stretch that. Would prefer not to though if I can help it

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/530087818610860830/
Vendetta Cycles British Racer | Cycle EXIF
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/4855512070904503/

Thanks for the help everyone!
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Old 08-03-16, 10:06 PM
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Old 08-04-16, 01:45 AM
  #3  
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Nothing wrong with any kind of bike, even a trendy "hipster" single-speed ... . but a single-speed might beat you up on those steep hills ... but since your identity isn't tied to your riding, you can simply get off and walk, like people used to (most "cyclists" would rather get hit by a car than push their bikes up a hill ... direct connection between ego and performance (I must confess to having a small dose of this disease myself.)

The British Racer you linked to has gearing, which is pretty handy in hilly terrain.

Another thing to consider is that you will need to wear a knapsack everywhere if you don't use a rack or basket. Either way works.

Nashbar.com might have some inexpensive fixie frames, as might BikesDirect. Your other best bet is local classifieds or Craigslist---not many factories sell the kind of bike nowadays, but there are a lot of lightweight, steel-framed English racers for sale used.
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Old 08-04-16, 06:16 AM
  #4  
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Hills usually means you'll need some gears.
Go to a few bike shops and find I shop you feel comfortable with. Then talk to the owner/manager about the kind of riding you'll be doing, what you'll carry on the bike (for classes, etc), how far you'll ride, how often, your budget (for bike, helmet, and accessories), etc. Test ride every bike that is suggested. S/he will get you on the correct bike.
Be sure to let us know what bike you get. We like pics.
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Old 08-04-16, 06:32 AM
  #5  
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For your first bike, I'd say don't go out looking for something like those pictures. That's normally someone's second (or third or fourth) bike that they've put a lot of time into restoring (or if they are for sale, they're going to want money for their time).

Get whatever you can afford with some gears...and then take your time looking for that dream bike...and spend your spare time learning/fixing it. In my opinion.
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Old 08-04-16, 07:10 AM
  #6  
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Old mountain bike with slick, skinnier commuter tires. Solves all your problems besides weight and looks, but realistically a fit man should be able to carry a MTB up two flights of stairs. Bulkiness of a bike is far more of an issue in such things than a couple extra pounds.

If you are riding it to college, it is going to get banged up, jostled around, and probably end up with someone else's handlebars through its spokes at least once when you come out of class. It may end up stolen. It will sit out in the elements. The last thing you want with a college commuter is something you have put a lot of time or money into.
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Old 08-04-16, 07:19 AM
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hey based on what you said, check out :

GREEN 8e - KHS BicyclesKHS Bicycles

it's not a single speed but it has a vintage look to it.

if not then look into:

Product Description | Origin8

both are in your price range and easily purchased from most bike shops in town.
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Old 08-04-16, 07:31 AM
  #8  
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Don't get a nice bike to lock up on campus. Someone will relieve you of it.

Rummage craigslist. Find the cheapest and most sound bicycle that you can find IN YOUR SIZE. The uglier the better, really.
If it looks too nice, take a rattle can to it. I have seen some great and removable "ghetto up" jobs done with plasticoat. Make it look like a POS, but run well. Get a good chain to lock up with. I highly suggest finding a bike that uses bolts and not quick releases for the wheels and seat, etc.
Rack mounts are your friends.
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Old 08-04-16, 08:15 AM
  #9  
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You're right to limit what you spend on a first bike, especially one for campus use. As a novice, you won't really know what you want until you're using something. Also, campus bikes lead hard lives, and are more likely to be stolen.

Considering your requirements:
Short, frequent rides, mostly flat, but some hills. You're commuting, so you'll need a way to carry things (backpack or rack). Low cost, low maintenance, simple. Lightweight/easy to store at home.

I recommend:
Get a good enough lock. Look at what others are using. You want to be better than average

Figure out how you're going to haul stuff. Backpacks are great, especially on campus (easy to carry, easy to stow in a classroom), but they're hot in the summer. Messenger bags have the same advantages, are a little cooler, but hold less. Panniers that double as backpacks are also good, but require a rack ($$) and cost more ($$).

A used mountain bike, hybrid, or classic is an inexpensive way to meet your requirements, but may require more maintenance, and may have more go wrong. That means you'll either have to learn to maintain and repair at a cost of time and money for parts and tools, or pay someone to do it. On the other hand, if you buy a $50 Schwinn Varsity or $100 Trek 720 every couple of years, you're still under budget.

There is an embarrassment of riches for new bikes <$500 that could meet your needs. A single speed would work, but require that you tough out the hills until your conditioning improves. A 3, 7, or 8 speed would cost a little more, but be more versatile. Linus Roadster or Dutchi, Pure Bourbon or William, Bianchi Milano, Bikes Direct Windsor Essex Deluxe or Oxford Deluxe, Nashbar Trekking Bike all might work for you.
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Old 08-04-16, 09:05 AM
  #10  
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Another simple solution on the single speed front, and one that I have used.....

Change your gear ratio with a smaller front sprocket, larger rear sprocket to match your ability to climb the hills and coast or go slow elsewhere.
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Old 08-04-16, 10:25 AM
  #11  
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OK, now for a reality check: Colege campuses are hotbeds for bike thieves, and even if your bike does not get stolen, you will be leaving it outside in all sorts of weather. As a result, you need to minimize your risk. Don't buy anything more than you can afford to have stolen. The cheaper and simpler the better. Perhaps if the big-box store has a single-speed or maybe even a simple bike with internal-gear hub? It ain't gonna be light, but it will be cheap.
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Old 08-04-16, 11:15 AM
  #12  
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Or even a Rasor scooter , with a folding handle , you can stow it under your seat in the classrooms.
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Old 08-04-16, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Or even a Rasor scooter , with a folding handle , you can stow it under your seat in the classrooms.
Well, if you're gonna do THAT, better off buying a pair of Heelies....
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Old 08-04-16, 01:38 PM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
Don't get a nice bike to lock up on campus. Someone will relieve you of it.

Rummage craigslist. Find the cheapest and most sound bicycle that you can find IN YOUR SIZE. The uglier the better, really.
If it looks too nice, take a rattle can to it. I have seen some great and removable "ghetto up" jobs done with plasticoat. Make it look like a POS, but run well. Get a good chain to lock up with. I highly suggest finding a bike that uses bolts and not quick releases for the wheels and seat, etc.
Rack mounts are your friends.
Yes indeed. Ugly, beat up, but mechanically sound. And even so, get a good lock. It might be just enough to deter would be thieves to steal something nicer, or easier to steal.

Originally Posted by AlexCyclistRoch View Post
OK, now for a reality check: Colege campuses are hotbeds for bike thieves, and even if your bike does not get stolen, you will be leaving it outside in all sorts of weather. As a result, you need to minimize your risk. Don't buy anything more than you can afford to have stolen. The cheaper and simpler the better. Perhaps if the big-box store has a single-speed or maybe even a simple bike with internal-gear hub? It ain't gonna be light, but it will be cheap.
IGH bikes are usually not cheap.

My preference would be an old mountain bike or hybrid, about 15 to 20 years old. Hard to recommend a specific brand, but I would think something like a Trek 700 or 800 series bike, with street tires would be ideal. You should be able to pick something like that up for $100 to $200. And again, the more beat up it looks, the better.

FWIW, I would stay away from anything with too much hipster appeal.
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Old 08-04-16, 07:16 PM
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Brooklyn bikes offers good options. Public Bikes too.

http://www.brooklynbicycleco.com/collections/city-bikes/products/calyer
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Old 08-04-16, 08:30 PM
  #16  
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since the hills are few and short and far between grab a single speed Fuji Declaration for $400 bucks. Throw on pitlock skewers for your wheels and seatpost, get a good ulock for $50 bucks like an Abus Mini and lock and load. Don't leave it overnight anywhere.
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Old 08-04-16, 08:44 PM
  #17  
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I'd look into something like this.

Even paying for a full tuneup and slick tires at a shop you're into it cheap.

https://columbia.craigslist.org/bik/5691724667.html

https://columbia.craigslist.org/bik/5655436884.html
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Old 08-05-16, 08:10 AM
  #18  
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+1 to buying an older, well-maintained used bike and a substantial lock. Everyone who says that bike theft on a university campus is a real problem is right. I personally know of three bike thefts on our local UNLV campus including one of my own where the bike was locked in an enclosed employee bike parking area out-of-sight from passerbys. It was a cheap used bike bought for $20 that I used to ride from my work location to a nearby off campus building. Came out one day and it was gone even though the front wheel was in my office. Eventually got it back but the front brake was gone. It might be worth having a second lock you can leave at the place where you would park the bike so you don't have to carry a heavy lock with you all the time.

The two bikes listed in the above posting would make good candidates for you if they are the right size.
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Old 08-07-16, 09:39 PM
  #19  
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I'd not thought about bike theft that much. I mean I knew it was a serious thing, but not so much so that buying a new bike almost doesn't make sense in some people's eyes. These are the two single speed bikes I've been looking into:

https://www.purecycles.com/products/harding?variant=1001203901
http://www.fujibikes.com/bike/details/feather-

I've also been looking at the Retrospec Kinney. It's a 14 speed with the same sort of style. I would take the fenders off and probably add drop bars eventually, but overall it looks nice. I also would probably change the tires to all black when they wore out:
https://www.retrospecbicycles.com/collections/bikes/products/kinney-flat

If I went used, I would go for an old road bike since that essentially would have everything I wanted in terms of looks PLUS gears. I'm sorta hesitant to buy used though because I don't know what compnents are of good quality and what constitutes as a good buy and what &quot;good shape&quot; looks like. I did find this though and thought it looked nice. Thoughts?
https://columbia.craigslist.org/bik/5707468527.html

Last edited by thejohnpratt; 08-07-16 at 09:43 PM.
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Old 08-07-16, 10:42 PM
  #20  
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Yep, bike theft on college campuses is a big problem. One of my daughter's friends left her bike locked to a rack outside the dorm overnight and in the morning the lock had been shimmed and the bike (a new Trek hybrid) was long gone. My daughter took her 1990s rigid steel MTB that was in good mechanical condition but an entry level model with some mismatched parts and left it locked outside nightly with a mediocre cable lock and never had a problem. The bike was kind of ugly and really had nothing about it to attract attention. That bike is still her beater/commuter.

Find yourself an older steel 10 speed or MTB. Don't worry about appearance. In this case scratches, faded paint, cracked graphics, chips and/or a little non-structural rust are good things. Get it into good working order using used or entry level parts. Don't do a thing to make it look better or add any bling. Take reasonable precautions to prevent theft. With a beat up frame, you can even use a plain hardened steel security chain and a hefty security lock without worrying about scratching the paint. Make sure to secure the front wheel and the back wheel through the frame stays to a good solid bike rack or other immovable object.

Check with a local bike co-op (most college towns have one) or the local bike shops. Often bike shops sell used bikes that they have traded in and will have made sure the bike is in safe working order. If you have access to a bike co-op, it is a good idea to start a relationship with them as they are a source of inexpensive parts and expertise to perform maintenance and repairs on a beater bike.

Older entry level bikes can be had for $100 or less in decently functional condition. Figure another $50 to $100 for parts and a tune up just to be on the safe side. Oh, and $25 for a good chain and lock.

I know you mentioned a road bike, but consider the rigid (no suspension) steel mountain bikes from the late 1980s through 1990s. These bikes are durable as hell, reliable, the parts are still easy to come by, and they usually have plenty of eyelets for fenders and racks. Replace the knobby tires with some decent hybrid tires and they make great commuters for higher risk areas. They are cheap and plentiful so not a desirable target for thieves.



Find yourself something like this, put on some commuter tires, a rear rack, and maybe plastic fenders and you'll have a reliable commuter that won't attract unwanted attention.
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Old 08-07-16, 11:07 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by GravelMN View Post
Yep, bike theft on college campuses is a big problem.
Find yourself something like this, put on some commuter tires, a rear rack, and maybe plastic fenders and you'll have a reliable commuter that won't attract unwanted attention.
[/CENTER]
If you absolutely need to have a bike with style, consider getting two---a beater for times when you might be leaving it locked unattended, and a nicer bike for when you will be able to keep an eye on it.

Even an ugly beater will be stolen if it is easy enough ... which means easier to steal than the nicer bikes next to it. Most campus thefts, i'd imagine, are not done by pros looking for high-end bikes with high resale.

If you do get a nice bike, get a double-end U-lock and a ridiculous chain and padlock. Any lock can be smashed, any chain can be cut ... but if it enough of a pain in the butt, the thieves might not bother. Of course, that will mean spending $300 to lock up a $600 bike, but at least the locks and bike will be there when you get back.

Also, of course, the locks and chain will weigh almost as much as the bike itself. But you will have a bike.
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Old 08-08-16, 05:15 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by thejohnpratt View Post
I'd not thought about bike theft that much. I mean I knew it was a serious thing, but not so much so that buying a new bike almost doesn't make sense in some people's eyes. These are the two single speed bikes I've been looking into:

https://www.purecycles.com/products/...ant=1001203901
Fuji Bikes | LIFESTYLE | URBAN | FEATHER

I've also been looking at the Retrospec Kinney. It's a 14 speed with the same sort of style. I would take the fenders off and probably add drop bars eventually, but overall it looks nice. I also would probably change the tires to all black when they wore out:
https://www.retrospecbicycles.com/co...ts/kinney-flat

If I went used, I would go for an old road bike since that essentially would have everything I wanted in terms of looks PLUS gears. I'm sorta hesitant to buy used though because I don't know what compnents are of good quality and what constitutes as a good buy and what &quot;good shape&quot; looks like. I did find this though and thought it looked nice. Thoughts?
https://columbia.craigslist.org/bik/5707468527.html

If you aren't gonna ride a bike that isn't 'cool' then go ahead and get one of the first three. Just lock it up properly. Get a set of pitlocks to protect your wheels, seat and headset: Set #02/GA Pitlock locking skewers

And get a nice double locking u-lock like from Abus: https://smile.amazon.com/Abus-523137...ds=abus+granit

Between the pitlocks and the u-lock you are very safe and don't have to carry 10lbs of locks and chains with you (cables are useless)

Always lock the frame smartly. Never ever ever lock it overnight anywhere. And lock it in the right places that are full of traffic and easily seen. And check on the bike anytime you can. You should be good to go although nothing is foulproof.
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