Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Worn tire by bottle dynamo

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Worn tire by bottle dynamo

Old 08-05-16, 10:07 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Worn tire by bottle dynamo

I'm a fan of using dynamos as I ride a lot at night but recently been having real trouble with getting the dynamo to work and on close inspection seems the dynamo strip on the wheel is now smooth (completely worn out). I'm not really excited about the idea of changing the wheel and hub dynamos are too expensive for my tastes...any ideas how to make the dynamo work again? was thinking maybe covering the dynamo wheel in something to make it a tighter fit with the wheel and make it spin easier but don't know exactly what...(duct tape?)
nutrageti is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 10:20 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 38,926

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5898 Post(s)
Liked 2,761 Times in 1,543 Posts
Decades ago there were molded rubber boots for dynamo drive wheels. They've gone out of fashion along with bottle dynamos, and I have no idea whether they're still made. You can probably improvise something with friction, or by removing the wheel and dipping it in liquid rubber.

Whether you buy/make a boot of some kind, the key to tire life with bottle dynamos is precise alignment with the axle pointed exactly to the center line of the wheel's axle. Any misalignment will cause a skewing or scuffing as it rolls and quickly chew through a tire.

BTW - way back when (early seventies?) Sanyo introduced a bottom bracket mounted dynamo

which was pretty nice. It tolled with much less friction bearing directly on the tire's center tread. Since then others have copied the basic design, but I don't know if any are still made. If so, you might find these to be a better alternative, spanning the gap between bottle type and hub dynamos.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

Just because I'm tired of arguing, doesn't mean you're right.

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 08-05-16 at 10:27 AM.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 11:07 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1131 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
BTW - way back when (early seventies?) Sanyo introduced a bottom bracket mounted dynamo

which was pretty nice. It tolled with much less friction bearing directly on the tire's center tread. Since then others have copied the basic design, but I don't know if any are still made. If so, you might find these to be a better alternative, spanning the gap between bottle type and hub dynamos.
You could try using a thick O-ring as friction material, provided the dynamo "wheel" is concave. (The last one I looked at was... for some reason, I haven't seen many so I'm not sure if this is the norm. I'd find it weird if it were the norm.)

When I read "bottom bracket dynamo" I thought, "What a stupid idea, you'd always have to be pedaling!" Then I looked at the picture.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:08 PM
  #4  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,357 Times in 863 Posts
Relocate the dynamo drive drum to come down upon the tire tread edge, compared to the sidewall
, it's thicker rubber there
fietsbob is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:17 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,548
Mentioned: 217 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18424 Post(s)
Liked 4,544 Times in 3,376 Posts
I'm not exactly sure what is worn.

Years ago I was using one of the bottle generators. The toothed wheel on the generator engaged the tire near the top of the wheel and had worn smooth. So, I was able to simply remove that toothed wheel and turn it upside down, giving me almost new teeth to engage the tire once again.

I'm not sure if it was supposed to be reversible, but it was close enough that it worked fine.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:32 PM
  #6  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,357 Times in 863 Posts
Bush and Muller bottle dynamo Busch & Müller Dymotec 6 light travel dynamo

have replaceable rubber drum tires + they offer a wire wheel to grip better in wetter weather ,
fietsbob is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:40 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1131 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
Bush and Muller bottle dynamo Busch & Müller Dymotec 6 light travel dynamo

have replaceable rubber drum tires + they offer a wire wheel to grip better in wetter weather ,
Wow, that's super cheap... interesting. Only 3W though.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:45 PM
  #8  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,357 Times in 863 Posts
A Watt is Work. you want to work harder?

Standard for Bike Dynamos is 3W @ 6V * the efficiency of LED lights has increased substantially..

* has been 2.4w Front, 0.6w rear for decades for Halogen and other incandescent bulbs

There used to be a 12V bottle dynamo, search E-Bay for those..


[links, because I don't sell them Myself ]




./.

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-06-16 at 04:32 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 08-05-16, 12:49 PM
  #9  
Heck on Wheels
 
SloButWide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: USA Midwest
Posts: 1,055

Bikes: In Signature

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33
Wow, that's super cheap... interesting. Only 3W though.

Nothing against StarBike, but you'll probably want to find it elsewhere, if possible. A quick Google search showed only StarBike.

U.S.A.Shipping costs
Worth of goods
33.38 $ 0 to 278.2 $
16.69 $ 278.2 to 556.4 $
11.13 $ from 556.4 $
__________________
"I had a great ride this morning, except for that part about winding up at work."

Bikes so far: 2011 Felt Z85, 80's Raleigh Sovereign (USA), 91 Bianchi Peregrine, 91 Austro-Daimler Pathfinder, 90's Trek 730 Multitrack, STOLEN: 80 Schwinn Voyageur (Japan)

SloButWide is offline  
Old 08-06-16, 01:46 PM
  #10  
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,839

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 154 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3615 Post(s)
Liked 3,446 Times in 1,957 Posts
if you do a lot of night riding, you may want to consider a dynamo hub. Costs a bit more up front, but won't wear your tires and gives you power at the flip of a switch rather than having to fiddle around engaging the dynamo.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 08-06-16, 01:59 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,548
Mentioned: 217 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18424 Post(s)
Liked 4,544 Times in 3,376 Posts
Is it the tire or the generator that is worn?

You could always flip the tire right to left, or rotate front to back. That should give you 4 clean sides of the tires to grind on.

Of course, I've been riding thin road tires for so long that many of those old bottle generators have been a big taboo (and I don't like the additional rolling resistance).

I do have a SON hub to build into a wheel... sometime.

But, I have also been using battery lamps. The latest is one of these.
3000LM CREE XM L2 LED 8 4V Front Bicycle Light Bike Lamp Torch Outdoor 4 Mode | eBay

(batteries sold separately). The battery packs seem to last quite a while with them, but I do regularly recharge after use, and usually carry at least one pack. I run on dim most of the time, but will bump it up to brights on fast descents, or other times when it seems needed.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 11:57 AM
  #12  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY
Decades ago there were molded rubber boots for dynamo drive wheels. They've gone out of fashion along with bottle dynamos, and I have no idea whether they're still made. You can probably improvise something with friction, or by removing the wheel and dipping it in liquid rubber.

Whether you buy/make a boot of some kind, the key to tire life with bottle dynamos is precise alignment with the axle pointed exactly to the center line of the wheel's axle. Any misalignment will cause a skewing or scuffing as it rolls and quickly chew through a tire.

BTW - way back when (early seventies?) Sanyo introduced a bottom bracket mounted dynamo

which was pretty nice. It tolled with much less friction bearing directly on the tire's center tread. Since then others have copied the basic design, but I don't know if any are still made. If so, you might find these to be a better alternative, spanning the gap between bottle type and hub dynamos.
Good memory Have never seen one of those bottom bracket dynamos but would surely give it a try if I found one )
nutrageti is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 12:00 PM
  #13  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33
You could try using a thick O-ring as friction material, provided the dynamo "wheel" is concave. (The last one I looked at was... for some reason, I haven't seen many so I'm not sure if this is the norm. I'd find it weird if it were the norm.)

When I read "bottom bracket dynamo" I thought, "What a stupid idea, you'd always have to be pedaling!" Then I looked at the picture.
Thick rubber ring might do the trick, would have to superglue it on i guess
nutrageti is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 12:03 PM
  #14  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob
Relocate the dynamo drive drum to come down upon the tire tread edge, compared to the sidewall
, it's thicker rubber there
First thing I'll try, though as a post later said and is the case for me, quick look at my wheel seems to suggest that the tire ain't as straight as it should be when spinning it, so that might be a reason for the tire getting worn
nutrageti is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 12:04 PM
  #15  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK
I'm not exactly sure what is worn.

Years ago I was using one of the bottle generators. The toothed wheel on the generator engaged the tire near the top of the wheel and had worn smooth. So, I was able to simply remove that toothed wheel and turn it upside down, giving me almost new teeth to engage the tire once again.

I'm not sure if it was supposed to be reversible, but it was close enough that it worked fine.
it's the tire that's worn
nutrageti is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 12:48 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 38,926

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5898 Post(s)
Liked 2,761 Times in 1,543 Posts
Originally Posted by nutrageti
Good memory Have never seen one of those bottom bracket dynamos but would surely give it a try if I found one )
I believe that Yellow Jersey might still have one of the Union versions made in Germany
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

Just because I'm tired of arguing, doesn't mean you're right.

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 01:03 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elevation 666m Edmonton Canada
Posts: 2,499

Bikes: 2013 Custom SA5w / Rohloff Tourster

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1244 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 253 Posts
I had bottle dynos on my bikes for 30 years. Very seldom used them, but they still wore grooves in the tire. Total crap on a good day. Definately one of the top 5 stupid bike inventions of all time. Even then they had a top speed of like 15 mph. My SA dyno does 45 mph.
GamblerGORD53 is offline  
Old 08-09-16, 12:52 PM
  #18  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Eastpointe,Michigan
Posts: 14

Bikes: A Motobecane Gran Jubilee(bought new circa 1978),aTriace bought at WalMart,an old Scwinn Varsity and two old Schwinn World Sports that I bought cheap at a bike swap meet.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I put a Sears generator driven light on my Motobecane Gran Jubilee soon after I bought the bike in the late Seventies.It is a 12 volt system with a 2 bulb headlamp.The smaller bulb gives a wide,short pattern(like a fog lamp on a car).The larger bulb gives a much longer but narrower pattern( like a regular headlight).I used to pass people at night and they thought that I was a car passing them.Sadly now,the system doesn't work and I haven't gotten around to seeing what the problem might be.I sure did like that light!.
I've bought battery style lights for the cheapo used bikes I bought a few years ago but I'm not very fond of any of those lights.The non LED lamps are too dim and the LED style,while brighter,doesn't give enough projection for adequate seeing ability.
ZTony8 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
sludge7
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
22
11-11-14 09:02 AM
Leo H.
Folding Bikes
7
12-06-12 09:22 AM
big chainring
Classic & Vintage
16
11-03-12 05:37 PM
RFC
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
9
01-04-12 08:35 AM
Zaphod Beeblebrox
Classic & Vintage
7
08-04-10 06:33 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.