Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Wheel suggestion for light trails with a Talus 3.

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Wheel suggestion for light trails with a Talus 3.

Old 09-15-16, 10:57 PM
  #1  
dabigboy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Moore, OK
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Wheel suggestion for light trails with a Talus 3.

Hi all,

I'm kind of a bike newbie. I'm shopping for some rims for my Raleigh Talus 3. My wife and I mostly pull the kids around town and local parks, so my current street/general use tires work fine for that. But I want to have a wheelset ready to rock that I can swap out when we go on trails. I'm about 215lbs, but not a hardcore rider by any means. The bike still has its factory Weinmann XC260 rear rim (which is double walled), but someone has replaced the front rim with a Matrix 550. The current front tire is a 26x1.95, but the rear is 2.125 (rim is labeled as taking a 1.95 max), so I may end up replacing at least my current rear street tire.

My thought was to get another XC260 for the front, put offroad tires on the XC260 rims, then get a respectable rear rim (maybe just another XC260) for street tires.

Questions:

Is there any reason I should be concerned about a 2.125 tire on the XC260 when it's labeled as 1.95 max?

Should I ditch the Matrix 550?

Is there another double-walled rim comparable in price to the XC260 that would be a better choice?

Any point in getting a fancier/more expensive freewheel for the new wheel set vs another identical one to what I have, or even upgrading to a cassette?

Thanks,

Matt
dabigboy is offline  
Old 09-16-16, 09:29 AM
  #2  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,100

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 504 Times in 296 Posts
Honestly, it sounds to me like you are looking to spend quite a bit of money for minimal, if any, gain.

Back in my formative years we had a lot of kids and not much money so I used to dumpster dive for bike parts. Front wheels were relatively easy to find. Rears, not so much. The original front wheel for your bicycle, rather than being damaged, was probably left somewhere so the owner had to buy the Matrix. For the kind of riding you are talking about, the front wheel doesn't do much more than hold up it's end of the bike. Unless having matching wheels is a big deal with you for aesthetic purposes, I'd leave well enough alone. If you want matching wheels, I'd try Niagara Bicycle on line to see if they have an XC 260 front. That'll probably be your cheapest and easiest alternative.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

Last edited by Retro Grouch; 09-16-16 at 09:35 AM.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 09-16-16, 09:46 AM
  #3  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,834

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4023 Post(s)
Liked 1,476 Times in 912 Posts
Originally Posted by dabigboy View Post
Hi all,

I'm kind of a bike newbie. I'm shopping for some rims for my Raleigh Talus 3. My wife and I mostly pull the kids around town and local parks, so my current street/general use tires work fine for that. But I want to have a wheelset ready to rock that I can swap out when we go on trails. I'm about 215lbs, but not a hardcore rider by any means. The bike still has its factory Weinmann XC260 rear rim (which is double walled), but someone has replaced the front rim with a Matrix 550. The current front tire is a 26x1.95, but the rear is 2.125 (rim is labeled as taking a 1.95 max), so I may end up replacing at least my current rear street tire.

My thought was to get another XC260 for the front, put offroad tires on the XC260 rims, then get a respectable rear rim (maybe just another XC260) for street tires.

Questions:

Is there any reason I should be concerned about a 2.125 tire on the XC260 when it's labeled as 1.95 max?

Should I ditch the Matrix 550?

Is there another double-walled rim comparable in price to the XC260 that would be a better choice?

Any point in getting a fancier/more expensive freewheel for the new wheel set vs another identical one to what I have, or even upgrading to a cassette?

Thanks,

Matt
Ignore the 1.95" maximum rating on your current rear wheel. Using a 2.125" tire on it isn't that large a change nor is it a problem. I've run 2.2 to 2.3" tires on rims that are narrower than yours (17mm vs 24mm) for a long time without problems.

I also suggest that you don't spend a lot of money on upgrades for this bike. It's a solid entry level bike but save the money you could spend on upgrades towards a better bike in the future. It's just not worth sinking a whole lot of money into it without sinking a whole lot of money into it. It's better to put that money into a much better bike.

The one proviso is that if the current wheel has a freewheel, upgrading to a cassette is worth the cost...but it's not going to cost that much to upgrade.

If you feel the need to buy another set of wheels, go with a modest price wheelset. Again, don't spend a whole lot of money on them. Something similar to what you have would be best.

As for mismatched wheels, it's nothing more than a cosmetic issue. Lots of stuff happens to front wheels. They get bent in racks (always park your bike with the rear wheel in the rack to avoid this). They get stolen. They get forgotten at trailheads. Etc. But functionally, they are all the same.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-16-16, 12:52 PM
  #4  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,406

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4004 Post(s)
Liked 1,810 Times in 1,158 Posts
Mismatched tires and rims seldom matter. Appropriate tire choices matter more. Get some good all terrain tires from Schwalbe, Kenda, Michelin, etc., and just ride on. Unless you're riding serious single track or fast road races, those should be good enough. And you'll enjoy not having to mess with flats. Personally, I like a chevron pattern over the tread block or sorta-cyclocross type treads. The chevron pattern treads seem to rider quieter and smoother on pavement -- wet and dry -- and still grip plenty well enough on gravel and trails for casual riding.

My compact frame hybrid has the stock Alex Z-1000 single wall rim on the front, and I replaced the rear with a Weinmann Zac-19 double wall last spring after warping the original Z-1000. The front will probably last for years because the spring suspension fork and weight distribution minimize the kind of impact that warped the rear.

Both wear 700x40 Michelin Protek Cross Max, which I can't recommend highly enough as all around pavement/trail tires. They're heavy but bulletproof, with a very secure feel. I've ridden through many patches of unavoidable broken glass and other sharp debris -- not a single flat in a year. The tread doesn't even pick up gravel, glass or debris in the tread like some tires. I'll probably never ride single track but I enjoy gravel and casual off road rides because these tires have a very predictable feel, wet or dry, firm or loose ground. They won't do mud or climb loose slidey hills. But they do everything I want to do.

My other bike is road frame sorta hybrid, with Araya single wall rims. The bike came with Innova tires that closely resemble the Michelin Protek Cross Max tread, have similarly thick and rigid sidewalls, and ride just like 'em. The front wears a 700x35, the rear a 700x38. You have to look closely to notice the width difference. But the ride was fine. Felt great at 60-65 psi, a bit below the maximum recommended 75 psi.

A couple of weeks ago I warped the rear rim while sliding on a patch of loose gravel on blacktop. I don't think the slide did the damage, it was the sudden jarring sideways stop after I slid through the gravel and rejoined the clear asphalt. I didn't fall, so I'm happy. The LBS whanged the rim back into shape. The tech literally whacked the rim sideways against a wooden table, like a butcher block, checked the spokes, etc. -- looks good as new. (Some gunsmiths use the same technique to straighten rifle barrels, or to change the barrel angle set in an air rifle mounting block! Whipping the barrel against a massive wooden table.) I considered replacing it with another Weinmann double wall rim (hey, they ain't sexy but they're affordable and readily available pre-built for cheap from a few suppliers). But after a week of riding on it, the wheel is fine. Might as well keep using it.

About a week ago I swapped those new tires for an older pair of Specialized Hemisphere 700x38 that I had in the closet. Just curious to compare the ride. With higher pressure the ride feels very slightly quicker, although it doesn't register as much speed increase on my cycling apps. And the ride is harsher, despite the supposed advantage of thinner, more supple sidewalls. 90-100 psi feels about the same no matter the tire. But I probably will switch back to the Innovas. The Hemisphere tread blocks and water channels tend to pick up and hold pebbles and debris. That's what led to four flats in one month last year, which is why I switched to the Michelins. And the tread block pattern on the Hemisphere rides much noisier than the chevron pattern Michelins and Innovas.

Last edited by canklecat; 09-16-16 at 12:57 PM.
canklecat is offline  
Old 09-16-16, 01:31 PM
  #5  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,310 Times in 823 Posts
Dual track AKA Gravel roads are 'light trails'. You trash the original wheel already?

The now wholly owned by Trek, Keith Bontrager dumpster dived at the Specialized Bike HQ

and got a Bunch of 40 spoke MA 40 Road bike rims rolled them down to use a 26: tire

and had some super light MTB Race Wheels

Before the Industry caught on , so get the tire you like and Try It.

before you worry about the inadequacies of what you have , in Theory.





./.

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-16-16 at 01:37 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-18-16, 11:34 PM
  #6  
dabigboy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Moore, OK
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Great feedback, thanks all! I wasn't planning on dumping a ton of money, just wanted a second set of rims with the offroad tires ready for action. I went to the Draper trails today with a friend (that was a BLAST!). We had a few muddy spots due to yesterday's rain, and even at our relatively slow speed, the bike felt skittish at times....I'll look into the suggestions on tire makers. Actually, my last bike had offroad tires and did just fine on the road. Now I'm thinking I might be better off putting offroad tires on my current rims and riding like that for a while. If they do OK on the road, I might just keep them on all the time. If not, I can always buy the second set of rims later.

Fietsbob, I didn't trash the wheel, this is a used bike and came like this. I have no concerns about mismatched rims, other than this front one possibly being weak...but I did beat it up pretty good at Draper today and it's still true. Interestingly, I can't seem to find replacements for the original rims, looks like they stopped selling them a couple years ago.

Anyways, the ride today reinforced my need to change tires. Still had an absolute blast!!!!

Matt
dabigboy is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 08:02 AM
  #7  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dabigboy View Post
Great feedback, thanks all! I wasn't planning on dumping a ton of money, just wanted a second set of rims with the offroad tires ready for action. I went to the Draper trails today with a friend (that was a BLAST!). We had a few muddy spots due to yesterday's rain, and even at our relatively slow speed, the bike felt skittish at times....I'll look into the suggestions on tire makers. Actually, my last bike had offroad tires and did just fine on the road. Now I'm thinking I might be better off putting offroad tires on my current rims and riding like that for a while. If they do OK on the road, I might just keep them on all the time. If not, I can always buy the second set of rims later.

Fietsbob, I didn't trash the wheel, this is a used bike and came like this. I have no concerns about mismatched rims, other than this front one possibly being weak...but I did beat it up pretty good at Draper today and it's still true. Interestingly, I can't seem to find replacements for the original rims, looks like they stopped selling them a couple years ago.

Anyways, the ride today reinforced my need to change tires. Still had an absolute blast!!!!

Matt
I second getting better tires however, I must comment on your riding.

If the trails are muddy you should NOT be riding on them. It degrades the trail very quickly and makes it hard for trail crews to keep up.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 09-22-16, 11:31 PM
  #8  
dabigboy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Moore, OK
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Your comment is well taken. There were only a few spots where we were slinging a lot of mud on our bikes. But, having seen the conditions a day after a moderate rain, I'll give it at least two days or so in the future to dry out.

My only excuse is that I rarely get a chance to bike without the kiddie trailer, and I was seriously itching for my first actual trail ride.

Matt
dabigboy is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
VultureStance
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
2
02-10-19 10:32 AM
KC8QVO
Touring
8
05-03-16 08:06 AM
beakersbike
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
5
06-21-15 06:31 AM
supaman
Hybrid Bicycles
7
10-17-14 06:54 PM
bainebarray
Texas
5
06-17-11 06:39 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.