Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

What type of bike to get? Hyrid/Fitness or Road Bike?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

What type of bike to get? Hyrid/Fitness or Road Bike?

Old 10-14-16, 01:33 PM
  #1  
finch204
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 288

Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Flatbar Madone, 2018 Giant Roam 2

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
What type of bike to get? Hyrid/Fitness or Road Bike?

I currently have a Trek Madone that is a little too big for me. It is giving me shoulder/neck pain even with a shorter stem. I'm going to be trading it in for another bike that fits me better. I need help deciding the kind of bike I need. I've narrowed it down to a hybrid/fitness bike or a road bike.

- I ride solo almost all the time. (My wife has a Trek FX, but is busy with the baby and probably won't be riding with me for a couple of years until our baby gets older.)

- I usually ride at night, from around 9:30 - 11pm.

- My bike rides are usually short 15-25 minute rides. I don't have that much free time, so I don't really see myself riding longer than an hour max.

- My rides mainly consists of rides on the neighborhood streets and sometimes on the sidewalks around the neighborhood. Sometimes I will ride my bike on multi-purpose bike paths. I would say 90-95% of my rides are on neighborhood streets.

- I am embarrassed to say that I haven't taken my road bike out on the roads... yet. Part of the issue was not having headlights and tail-lights. I have both now, so I might take it out on the road, but I'm still hesitant to do that especially at night.

- I ride as a way of exercise. My rides are simple. I go fast on the straights, then catch my breath while riding back to my starting point, then rinse and repeat.

- I have no plans to do any racing or century rides.

- I am not a fast rider, but I do like going fast whenever I can. I also like taking corners at speed.

I currently ride a Trek 7.2 FX. It is heavy and slow compared to my Madone. It's not as fun to take corners at speed with the FX than the Madone. All of this is expected. However I'm not getting any shoulder/neck pain when riding the FX as opposed to the Madone. I think a bigger part of that is a fit issue really. The point I'm trying to make here is that I want a bike that is lighter and takes corner faster than the 7.2 FX I'm currently riding.

Looking at the info I presented above, it seems like a fitness bike or flat bar road bike fits me better. However I did test ride a better fitting Domane last weekend and thought it was a great ride. I don't know if a road bike is overkill for the short 15-25 minute bike rides that I mostly do. What do you guys and gals think? Should I stick with a hybrid/fitness bike or would a road bike work for me as well?
finch204 is offline  
Old 10-14-16, 01:39 PM
  #2  
puma1552
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 728

Bikes: '17 Colnago C-RS (Full 5800); '16 Specialized Sirrus Elite

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 351 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 35 Posts
I don't think you need a road bike at all, personally.
puma1552 is offline  
Old 10-14-16, 02:03 PM
  #3  
SugarMonkey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Central IL
Posts: 99

Bikes: MTB, hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You can ride a road bike for 15-25 minutes, but that's not really all that much and pretty much any bike would work for that amount of time in the saddle.

If your heart is set on a road bike, get one, but if it costs money you don't really have, I'd say stick with the hybrid.
SugarMonkey is offline  
Old 10-14-16, 02:20 PM
  #4  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 13,130

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2017 Workswell 093, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 143 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6320 Post(s)
Liked 1,268 Times in 726 Posts
A well-fit bike will feel good, no matter what style of bike it is.

There is no requirement for riding a certain speed or distance or on a road of a certain size to own a "road bike (by which I assume you mean a bike with drop bars.) If you find a bike which feels good, you will ride it. If it doesn't feel good, you will probably ride it less.

If the Trek hybrid isn't fun ... and you can afford it ... get a bike which is more fun. Otherwise, just jog.

Bike style (drop bar, flat bar, bent over, upright) is all just a matter of taste. None is better than another. I prefer a drop bar road bike, but I have ridden thousands of mile son flat-bar bikes and loved that too. There is no "Right" answer, except to buy the bike that you like best.

If people question you later, tell them to come here and debate me. A couple of my wall-of-dull-text posts and they won't care what you ride.

Get a bike that makes you smile. Get a bike you like to ride. Then ... ride your bike and smile.
Maelochs is online now  
Old 10-14-16, 02:26 PM
  #5  
Motolegs
Senior Member
 
Motolegs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Southern Colorado
Posts: 493

Bikes: General 80's MTB "Icebreaker", Motobecane Grand Jubilee (vintage mint), Trek 1.1, 2014 Motobecane Mirage (steel) Trek 3500 MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are some pretty slick, lightweight hybrid bikes around. My dad recently got a Fuji Sunfire from Bikes Direct. I rode it around a few times while helping him dial it in, and dang if that thing isn't quick, and a blast to ride. Did an unofficial lift test with it and my road bikes, and although it was heavier it didn't seem like by that much. If I could have only one bike that one would be around the top of my list.
Motolegs is offline  
Old 10-14-16, 05:24 PM
  #6  
ScootermanBob
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 32

Bikes: 2017 Giant Cypress DX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
A well-fit bike will feel good, no matter what style of bike it is.

There is no requirement for riding a certain speed or distance or on a road of a certain size to own a "road bike (by which I assume you mean a bike with drop bars.) If you find a bike which feels good, you will ride it. If it doesn't feel good, you will probably ride it less.

If the Trek hybrid isn't fun ... and you can afford it ... get a bike which is more fun. Otherwise, just jog.

Bike style (drop bar, flat bar, bent over, upright) is all just a matter of taste. None is better than another. I prefer a drop bar road bike, but I have ridden thousands of mile son flat-bar bikes and loved that too. There is no "Right" answer, except to buy the bike that you like best.

If people question you later, tell them to come here and debate me. A couple of my wall-of-dull-text posts and they won't care what you ride.

Get a bike that makes you smile. Get a bike you like to ride. Then ... ride your bike and smile.

Great post! I have two road bikes, one mountain bike, and a recently purchased hybrid. The hybrid is THE bike for me. Comfortable and smooth. At this point in life that is what I'm looking for. Nothing wrong with the others but get what YOU like and what will work for your situation. Once you figure that out, get it and ride. It will be one of the best things you do.


Bob
ScootermanBob is offline  
Old 10-14-16, 09:23 PM
  #7  
zze86
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 664
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I count 1 against the road bike and 3 neutral so I'll chime in and say get the road bike.

You say you're doing this for excercise but only 15-25 min at a time and only half of that at a considerable pace. That's really not much time with your heart rate up at all. A road bike forces you into a more aggressive position so you kind of subconsciously find youself riding faster.

Sure you can ride any bike fast but the psychological effect of a road bike makes you want to go fast more often.
zze86 is offline  
Old 10-15-16, 06:41 AM
  #8  
JonathanGennick 
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 4,131

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 55 Times in 37 Posts
If you like flat-bar and the FX is too heavy, maybe look at something like the Trek Zektor that is more street-oriented.

Possibly it would help on the Madone to have a stem with a higher rise to it. Get your hand position higher so that your neck doesn't bend so much.

I've a friend who put flat bars on his road bike -- it's a Trek model of some sort -- and he likes it that way. He converted the bike to flat bars as an alternative to taking a bath from selling the bike. Older guy, and I think he was finding he didn't bend well enough for the road bars.
JonathanGennick is offline  
Old 10-15-16, 09:50 AM
  #9  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,322 Times in 832 Posts
FX S 6 | Trek Bikes
your Domane - Boone of Trek carbon fiber hybrids.. with the Iso speed seat tube elastomer 'decoupler' ..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 10-15-16, 11:02 PM
  #10  
AlmostTrick
Tortoise Wins by a Hare!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Looney Tunes, IL
Posts: 7,397

Bikes: Wabi Special FG, Raleigh Roper, Nashbar AL-1, Miyata One Hundred, '70 Schwinn Lemonator and More!!

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1546 Post(s)
Liked 919 Times in 496 Posts
The FX is probably around 25 pounds, correct? That's not heavy. Upgrading to a set of nice rolling, supple tires like those offered by Compass will really make a noticeable difference to the performance of any bike.

Get the style bike and handlebars that work best for you. Lots of us prefer non-drop bar road bikes... and they can be set up for quick riding.
AlmostTrick is offline  
Old 10-15-16, 11:41 PM
  #11  
ZMC888
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have eight bikes (5 mtbs, one CX and one road bike and a folding bike) for the road I'd never have anything but a road or CX bike. Although ultra busy eg. NY, London developing Asian country streets a flat bar does give your more control.

Personally I'd experiment with the Madone and try fitting wider tires, putting on a shorter riser stem etc.
ZMC888 is offline  
Old 10-17-16, 01:11 PM
  #12  
finch204
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 288

Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Flatbar Madone, 2018 Giant Roam 2

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I appreciate the feedback everyone.

Yes by road bike I meant bikes with drop bars. Other than the resulting shoulder/neck pain from riding my Madone, I don't really have a problem with drop bars. I appreciate the various hand positions it offers, though I rarely ride in the drops. Part of the problem is my flexibility, but my main problem with it is safety. Since I ride at night and on neighborhood streets, I have to constantly be on the lookout for cars. I find that it is hard to ride fast on the drops while also being comfortable enough to check for incoming cars at intersections. I usually am on the hoods when going fast in the straights. (Just to clarify, the straights that I go fast on, are littered with T-intersections, which is why I need to keep a lookout on incoming cars.)

I went from the stock 90mm stem to a 60mm stem on my Madone. While the tape measure obviously shows a shorter saddle to handlebar reach, I still felt too stretched out on the bike and the shoulder/neck pain is still there. I could go for a 60mm 30 degree stem from Ritchey and a short reach dropbar from Specialized, but that got me thinking, maybe my money is better spent on getting a bike that fits me better right from the start.

The cheapest option for me would be to convert my Madone into a flat bar road bike. Advantages would be less money spent, while retaining the lightweight frame and previous gen Ultegra components. The disadvantage would be, I would have to spend money to know if the resulting flat bar conversion will actually fix my shoulder/neck issues. If it doesn't work, then I will have lost more money than if I just traded it in from the start. The guy at the LBS also said something that made sense to me. It is better to do a flat bar conversion on a road bike that is correctly sized from the start, as opposed to converting an incorrectly sized bigger bike to make it fit you.

I've looked at the Zektor but I don't like how it looks. Also the highest end model is almost as heavy as a low end 7.2 FX.

Right now I'm leaning towards getting a carbon framed Specialized Sirrus or a Trek FX S 5/6. I can't decide which one to get.
- I've been a fan of the Sirrus ever since I started looking into bikes a couple of years ago. I think the 2017 Sirrus Sport Carbon looks great, though it has some relatively entry level components. The Sport Carbon model isn't priced really high though so I'm not surprised that it doesn't have higher end components.
- I am a fan of the Isospeed decoupler which can be found on the Trek FX S 5/6. These bikes are basically flat bar Domanes. They have better road bike oriented components (Tiagra/105) and are the only FX bike models that come with disc brakes. Not a big fan of the paint job though and they are more expensive than the Sirrus.
- A third surprising option for me, would be to get a Domane that is sized correctly, like 52 cm Domane S 4. One advantage here is I could go with a flat bar conversion if I still have shoulder/neck pain and the bike would still be sized correctly for me. The disadvantage is, if I did have to go with a flat bar conversion, I should just save my money and get a FX S 5/6 LOL.
finch204 is offline  
Old 10-18-16, 12:05 AM
  #13  
23109VC
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 47

Bikes: 2013 Scott Foil 30, 2008 Scott SUB 20

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I just saw your post and I'm in a similar situation as the OP.

I have a hybrid bike, I ride about 3x week.. averaging an hour or less each ride.. maybe 10-15 miles per ride. I love my hybrid bike.. it is a straight bar bike.. it is pretty fast.. I have cages on it.. no clip/shoes.. and just with my cages I feellike I can go pretty fast..but I know it's not AS fast as a road bike.. I've been riding more and more and got the itch to get a "cooler" road bike..soemthign that will go faster... deep down I know I don't NEED a road bike, since I ride for fun and for exercise...so anything i'm pedaling on gets the job done..but at the same time, it would be fun to have a newer / neater / faster bike.

I am shopping for a road bike..andsometimes feel like I shoudlnt' spend the money when I don't "need' it..but I also think i'd enjoy mytime more if I had a bike that got me more excited about riding. if you like your bike, you will ride it more.

if you like a hybrid..ride the hybrid. my hybrid gets my heart pumping and I get a great workout.. but it would be fun to feel faster and to maybe go on a longer ride, or to challenge oneself to go longer, faster, further.. I time all my rides, I use my phone/apple watch to track my current/average speeds, distance, etc... it's fun to just challenge myself... and occasionally try to keep up with another biker who is out on the same bike path I am on...

let us know if you do get a cool road bike. I think I am going to get one. not b/c I need it..but because I think it will make me want to ride even more... it's like driving - I like to drive..but if I had aporsche i'd like it even more...
23109VC is offline  
Old 10-18-16, 01:45 AM
  #14  
jgwilliams
Senior Member
 
jgwilliams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Surrey, UK
Posts: 643

Bikes: Mekk Poggion with SRAM Force, custom built 653 and 531 bikes with frames by Barry Witcomb, Giant XTC 4 mountain bike and a Brompton folding bike.

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 50 Posts
The Madone is a lovely bike so there's one further thing I'd suggest before you trade it in. Have you tried turning the stem over so as to raise the handlebars a little? If not, it's worth a go.

John
jgwilliams is offline  
Old 10-18-16, 05:28 AM
  #15  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,826

Bikes: '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1363 Post(s)
Liked 1,321 Times in 711 Posts
This...

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
A well-fit bike will feel good, no matter what style of bike it is.

There is no requirement for riding a certain speed or distance or on a road of a certain size to own a "road bike (by which I assume you mean a bike with drop bars.) If you find a bike which feels good, you will ride it. If it doesn't feel good, you will probably ride it less.

If the Trek hybrid isn't fun ... and you can afford it ... get a bike which is more fun. Otherwise, just jog.

Bike style (drop bar, flat bar, bent over, upright) is all just a matter of taste. None is better than another. I prefer a drop bar road bike, but I have ridden thousands of mile son flat-bar bikes and loved that too. There is no "Right" answer, except to buy the bike that you like best.

If people question you later, tell them to come here and debate me. A couple of my wall-of-dull-text posts and they won't care what you ride.

Get a bike that makes you smile. Get a bike you like to ride. Then ... ride your bike and smile.
^+1000. This sums the totality of your bike selection question in less than 300 words. Exactly this. Get what you enjoy riding now, as best as you can tell. Get it to fit as best as you can tell now. Ride to your heart's content...and then when you think that your needs have changed, re-think it.


What would I get? I'm not telling, because I'm not in your situation. Any bike will be fine really...
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 10-18-16, 05:40 AM
  #16  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,826

Bikes: '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1363 Post(s)
Liked 1,321 Times in 711 Posts
Also, the neck/shoulder pain is troubling. It just shouldn't be, and isn't necessarily symptomatic of just the road bike being "too stretched out". Maybe an orthopedist to look at what's going on?

He/she may say to work on upper body and core conditioning as well. There may be exercises to relieve some of the pinching that you're feeling. But fit will be key once you've worked out the physical ailment part.


Your upper body on a road bike isn't "leaning" on your arms, per se. On a well fit and correctly proportioned bike, you're balance point is more like a jockey standing in the stirrups while pedaling continuously. Just a portion of weight borne by your saddle and only a hair of weight on your hands. You should be floating on the bike with your shoulders relaxed and your head at a comfortable angle. A good fit and proper conditioning do just that...

Last edited by Phil_gretz; 10-18-16 at 05:42 AM. Reason: clarify
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 10-19-16, 05:22 PM
  #17  
finch204
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 288

Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Flatbar Madone, 2018 Giant Roam 2

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
The Madone is a lovely bike so there's one further thing I'd suggest before you trade it in. Have you tried turning the stem over so as to raise the handlebars a little? If not, it's worth a go.
Yes sir I have tried flipping the stem on both the stock and the 60 mm stem I currently have right now. It didn't help as much as I wanted it to.

Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Also, the neck/shoulder pain is troubling. It just shouldn't be, and isn't necessarily symptomatic of just the road bike being "too stretched out". Maybe an orthopedist to look at what's going on?

He/she may say to work on upper body and core conditioning as well. There may be exercises to relieve some of the pinching that you're feeling. But fit will be key once you've worked out the physical ailment part.

Your upper body on a road bike isn't "leaning" on your arms, per se. On a well fit and correctly proportioned bike, you're balance point is more like a jockey standing in the stirrups while pedaling continuously. Just a portion of weight borne by your saddle and only a hair of weight on your hands. You should be floating on the bike with your shoulders relaxed and your head at a comfortable angle. A good fit and proper conditioning do just that...
I forgot to mention that I've had issues with my neck and shoulder prior to buying my Madone. One of my doctor's said that I might have neck arthritis. Anyway, my neck and shoulders weren't an issue when I rode my Trek Verve, they became an issue when I traded in that bike for the Madone. As mentioned above, they are not a problem as well when riding a Trek FX bike.

When riding my Madone, the shoulder/neck pain doesn't really manifest themselves during my quick rides. I can feel some tightness on my left shoulder/neck, but I usually can offset that by leaning forward more (which actually causes lower back pain, but that's another story). The pain only really shows up the next day. So I actually can't tell if I'll have shoulder/neck pain while riding my Madone. When I test rode a Domane a few weekends ago, I recall being pleased at how easier it was to reach the handlebars, but I actually did feel some stiffness on my shoulder/neck during the test ride. However other than sore muscles the next day, I didn't get the usual shoulder/neck pain that I would after riding my Madone.
finch204 is offline  
Old 10-19-16, 06:25 PM
  #18  
one4smoke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Nashville, TN.
Posts: 2,137

Bikes: 2020 Specialized Roubaix Comp SC - 2016 Specialized Roubaix SL4 - 2015 Giant Roam 2 Disc

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 622 Post(s)
Liked 293 Times in 199 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
A well-fit bike will feel good, no matter what style of bike it is.

There is no requirement for riding a certain speed or distance or on a road of a certain size to own a "road bike (by which I assume you mean a bike with drop bars.) If you find a bike which feels good, you will ride it. If it doesn't feel good, you will probably ride it less.

If the Trek hybrid isn't fun ... and you can afford it ... get a bike which is more fun. Otherwise, just jog.

Bike style (drop bar, flat bar, bent over, upright) is all just a matter of taste. None is better than another. I prefer a drop bar road bike, but I have ridden thousands of mile son flat-bar bikes and loved that too. There is no "Right" answer, except to buy the bike that you like best.

If people question you later, tell them to come here and debate me. A couple of my wall-of-dull-text posts and they won't care what you ride.

Get a bike that makes you smile. Get a bike you like to ride. Then ... ride your bike and smile.
one4smoke is offline  
Old 10-19-16, 08:59 PM
  #19  
Florges
Junior Member
 
Florges's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: springvale
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You can get more speed on road bike.
Florges is offline  
Old 10-20-16, 04:37 AM
  #20  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,826

Bikes: '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1363 Post(s)
Liked 1,321 Times in 711 Posts
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post

I forgot to mention that I've had issues with my neck and shoulder prior to buying my Madone. One of my doctor's said that I might have neck arthritis...

I can feel some tightness on my left shoulder/neck, but I usually can offset that by leaning forward more (which actually causes lower back pain, but that's another story)...

I actually did feel some stiffness on my shoulder/neck during the test ride...
So, one doctor's "might be", and that's it? Why not address this concern sepatarely through diagnosis and treatment to eliminate it from the equation? Might just be a misalignment, or a knotted muscle or something about how you sleep, or simple weakness...not a permaent or chronic thing. Why not knock out?

Good luck.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 10-20-16, 06:23 AM
  #21  
BKE
Senior Member
 
BKE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Look into a CX or a gravel bike. My CX came with 32mm knobbies, great for trails and everything not so smooth. For my smooth road exercise I swap them with 25 mm smoothies.
BKE is offline  
Old 10-20-16, 06:49 AM
  #22  
Craptacular8
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 578
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
I appreciate the feedback everyone.

Yes by road bike I meant bikes with drop bars. Other than the resulting shoulder/neck pain from riding my Madone, I don't really have a problem with drop bars. I appreciate the various hand positions it offers, though I rarely ride in the drops. Part of the problem is my flexibility, but my main problem with it is safety. Since I ride at night and on neighborhood streets, I have to constantly be on the lookout for cars. I find that it is hard to ride fast on the drops while also being comfortable enough to check for incoming cars at intersections. I usually am on the hoods when going fast in the straights. (Just to clarify, the straights that I go fast on, are littered with T-intersections, which is why I need to keep a lookout on incoming cars.)

I went from the stock 90mm stem to a 60mm stem on my Madone. While the tape measure obviously shows a shorter saddle to handlebar reach, I still felt too stretched out on the bike and the shoulder/neck pain is still there. I could go for a 60mm 30 degree stem from Ritchey and a short reach dropbar from Specialized, but that got me thinking, maybe my money is better spent on getting a bike that fits me better right from the start.

The cheapest option for me would be to convert my Madone into a flat bar road bike. Advantages would be less money spent, while retaining the lightweight frame and previous gen Ultegra components. The disadvantage would be, I would have to spend money to know if the resulting flat bar conversion will actually fix my shoulder/neck issues. If it doesn't work, then I will have lost more money than if I just traded it in from the start. The guy at the LBS also said something that made sense to me. It is better to do a flat bar conversion on a road bike that is correctly sized from the start, as opposed to converting an incorrectly sized bigger bike to make it fit you.

I've looked at the Zektor but I don't like how it looks. Also the highest end model is almost as heavy as a low end 7.2 FX.

Right now I'm leaning towards getting a carbon framed Specialized Sirrus or a Trek FX S 5/6. I can't decide which one to get.
- I've been a fan of the Sirrus ever since I started looking into bikes a couple of years ago. I think the 2017 Sirrus Sport Carbon looks great, though it has some relatively entry level components. The Sport Carbon model isn't priced really high though so I'm not surprised that it doesn't have higher end components.
- I am a fan of the Isospeed decoupler which can be found on the Trek FX S 5/6. These bikes are basically flat bar Domanes. They have better road bike oriented components (Tiagra/105) and are the only FX bike models that come with disc brakes. Not a big fan of the paint job though and they are more expensive than the Sirrus.
- A third surprising option for me, would be to get a Domane that is sized correctly, like 52 cm Domane S 4. One advantage here is I could go with a flat bar conversion if I still have shoulder/neck pain and the bike would still be sized correctly for me. The disadvantage is, if I did have to go with a flat bar conversion, I should just save my money and get a FX S 5/6 LOL.

I'd probably just go for a test ride on each of your choices to see which one feels the best. the Domane is an endurance geometry drop bar, so should be pretty comfortable on the hoods, and feel similar in position to the flatbars you've mentioned, though probably still a little more forward leaning. In the disc version, it will accommodate up to a 32 width tire, which should help in comfort as well. That said, if you were thinking drop bar, and looking for comfort, the gravel/adventure genre of road bikes tends to get you very nearly the same position as the flatbars, and take a little wider tire as well. In Trek, this would be the crossrip series.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 10-20-16, 06:52 AM
  #23  
1989Pre
Standard Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Posts: 2,855

Bikes: 1948 P. Barnard & Son, 1962 Rudge Sports, 1963 Freddie Grubb Routier, 1980 Manufrance Hirondelle, 1983 F. Moser Sprint, 1989 Raleigh Technium Pre, 2001 Raleigh M80

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 732 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
You may not have to buy a new bike. While riding with wider tires/lower pressure might help, it seems to me that the problem might not be the bike, itself, but the level of tension in your shoulder/neck area and body in-general. Make sure you have some nice, foam tape on your bars, use gel gloves and get a sports (or deep tissue) massage. One massage a month for a few months might get your body and bike working together.
I think that you needing to be constantly vigilant for motor traffic (and maybe other factors) may be causing some excess tension in your neck and shoulders.

Last edited by 1989Pre; 10-20-16 at 06:55 AM.
1989Pre is offline  
Old 10-20-16, 09:46 AM
  #24  
finch204
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 288

Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Flatbar Madone, 2018 Giant Roam 2

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
So, one doctor's "might be", and that's it? Why not address this concern sepatarely through diagnosis and treatment to eliminate it from the equation? Might just be a misalignment, or a knotted muscle or something about how you sleep, or simple weakness...not a permaent or chronic thing. Why not knock out?

Good luck.
I did some things to address this. I've switched jobs so my commute is shorter (20-30 minutes vs 1 hour). Got a new mattress and pillow that better supports my neck. Got some lumbar support for the office chair to help me sit up straight. I try to take breaks every hour and walk around the parking lot and up the stairs. So far, my neck and shoulder issues haven't been an issue unless I ride my Madone, which sucks. I can ride the Trek FX the whole week and not have neck/shoulder pain.

Originally Posted by BKE View Post
Look into a CX or a gravel bike. My CX came with 32mm knobbies, great for trails and everything not so smooth. For my smooth road exercise I swap them with 25 mm smoothies.
Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
I'd probably just go for a test ride on each of your choices to see which one feels the best. the Domane is an endurance geometry drop bar, so should be pretty comfortable on the hoods, and feel similar in position to the flatbars you've mentioned, though probably still a little more forward leaning. In the disc version, it will accommodate up to a 32 width tire, which should help in comfort as well. That said, if you were thinking drop bar, and looking for comfort, the gravel/adventure genre of road bikes tends to get you very nearly the same position as the flatbars, and take a little wider tire as well. In Trek, this would be the crossrip series.
I looked into the Diverge and CrossRip and they are interesting bikes. I did not get to test ride them last time I was at the bike store because I was out of time after doing 3 test rides. I will say that my position on the Domane, is the most amount of lean I want when riding a road bike. I might try a test ride on those two bikes the next time I'm at my LBS.

Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
You may not have to buy a new bike. While riding with wider tires/lower pressure might help, it seems to me that the problem might not be the bike, itself, but the level of tension in your shoulder/neck area and body in-general. Make sure you have some nice, foam tape on your bars, use gel gloves and get a sports (or deep tissue) massage. One massage a month for a few months might get your body and bike working together.
I think that you needing to be constantly vigilant for motor traffic (and maybe other factors) may be causing some excess tension in your neck and shoulders.
You bring up a very interesting point. When riding on MUPS, where I can actually go faster without worrying about traffic, I actually don't recall dealing with neck/shoulder pain afterwards. Sure I would get sore muscles, but that's about it. I think riding at night, being already tired from work, colder temps and having to keep a constant lookout for traffic does increase tension on my neck and shoulders. Unfortunately, with a busy work schedule, a 5 month old demanding baby, the only time I can consistently ride my bikes is at night.

After riding the Trek FX for a few weeks, I've found that it is more important to be comfortable than aero on my short fitness rides. If I'm not comfortable, then I don't feel like riding and that's a losing situation for me. At this point, I just want to ride my Madone. People have suggested to find what I like and go with it. Well, on my Madone, I really like the lightweight frame, the smooth shifting Ultegra drivetrain and the way it handles speed and corners. I also really like the upright position on the Trek FX as it makes night riding easier and comfortable. So I've decided to pursue a flat bar conversion. I've made some measurements and I found that the saddle to handlebar distance on the Trek FX, is identical to the saddle to drop bar "tops" distance on my Madone when using the stock 90mm stem. Based on that info and some research I've done, I think a flat bar conversion will work out and will be a lot cheaper than getting a new bike. If it doesn't work out, then I'll save some money and get a different bike later on. I appreciate all the feedback and suggestions from everyone.
finch204 is offline  
Old 10-23-16, 05:20 PM
  #25  
side_FX
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post

I've looked at the Zektor but I don't like how it looks. Also the highest end model is almost as heavy as a low end 7.2 FX.

.
I'm curious about what you're didn't like about the looks? I'd like to see one live but there's none in my area yet. Im curious when they claim the "zipper" urban handling. Are they implying it fills the gap between a road bike and a FX?
side_FX is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.