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Wet steep rugged mountain roads?

Old 11-02-16, 02:31 PM
  #1  
forestcall
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Wet steep rugged mountain roads?

Hi all :-)

Question: A good complete road bike that would be ideal for steep + wet + rugged asphalt roads.

Im an avid Mtn biker but where I live in the cedar forest mountains of Japan there are almost ZERO trails.

What I do have is friggin amazing mountain roads. Steep and wet and rugged.

I want to buy a complete road bike that would be ideal for steep + wet + rugged asphalt roads (some holes, pebbles, tree debris).

My budget is $3000 for everything including all parts.
Also any suggestions on where to buy a bike with International shipping.

Thanks!!!!
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Old 11-02-16, 02:39 PM
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look at a cross bike with disc brakes

there are tons of online retailers in the US and UK that will ship internationally. $3000 will get you a lot of bike
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Old 11-02-16, 02:49 PM
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You probably want something with a ton of clearance for very wide road tires. Category names like "gravel" and "allroad" bikes tend to include such things.
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Old 11-02-16, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by ypsetihw View Post
look at a cross bike with disc brakes

there are tons of online retailers in the US and UK that will ship internationally. $3000 will get you a lot of bike
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
You probably want something with a ton of clearance for very wide road tires. Category names like "gravel" and "allroad" bikes tend to include such things.
Both of these are great suggestions and with your budget, you're probably able to get a pretty nice bike.

I'd definitely look into tubeless wheels and disc brakes.
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Old 11-02-16, 04:09 PM
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That's it?! Such tame responses!

Fixed gear. No handbrakes. With a pedal assist electric setup so you can go back up faster and ride it again.

Spend the money on tires.

WHEEE! Dorifto!
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Old 11-02-16, 04:17 PM
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If you don't plan to race, a "gravel" or "allroad" bike is a better bet than a cyclocross/cross/CX bike because the frame is more likely to have the ability to take things like fenders and racks. You may or may not want those but keep your options open unless you know you don't.

Also, ride dirt roads too if you have them. You'll need the same thing to descend wet pavement as you will to ride on dirt roads: slightly wider than normal road tires. Disc brakes (especially hydraulic which is doable in your budget) will help but aren't strictly necessary.
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Old 11-06-16, 08:17 PM
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Hi all :-)

You guys rock! I was away for a few days since the original post. But I did get a chance to brush up on the industry. Seems a gravel bike is the perfect evolution from the MTB to the Road Bike and in-between.

I went round and round but my main needs are:

(1) Frame type - easy to climb steep wet hills which means I need to sit with my weight forward on the seat so the tires don't spin out and I still can get a strong spin.

(2) 38+ mm tires

This led me to the Specialized Sequoia Elite 2017.

Thoughts?
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Old 11-06-16, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by forestcall View Post
Hi all :-)

You guys rock! I was away for a few days since the original post. But I did get a chance to brush up on the industry. Seems a gravel bike is the perfect evolution from the MTB to the Road Bike and in-between.

I went round and round but my main needs are:

(1) Frame type - easy to climb steep wet hills which means I need to sit with my weight forward on the seat so the tires don't spin out and I still can get a strong spin.

(2) 38+ mm tires

This led me to the Specialized Sequoia Elite 2017.

Thoughts?
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Old 11-07-16, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by forestcall View Post
Hi all :-)

You guys rock! I was away for a few days since the original post. But I did get a chance to brush up on the industry. Seems a gravel bike is the perfect evolution from the MTB to the Road Bike and in-between.

I went round and round but my main needs are:

(1) Frame type - easy to climb steep wet hills which means I need to sit with my weight forward on the seat so the tires don't spin out and I still can get a strong spin.

(2) 38+ mm tires

This led me to the Specialized Sequoia Elite 2017.

Thoughts?
I'm not huge on Specialized bikes, but I've looked up the Sequoia and it's a pretty sweet looking bike.

There are tons of bikes in this range from all of the major manufacturers and all of the more "indy" brands as well.
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Old 11-07-16, 03:55 PM
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Old 11-07-16, 04:41 PM
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[QUOTE=forestcall;19164906]Hi all :-)

"I want to buy a complete road bike that would be ideal for steep + wet + rugged asphalt roads (some holes, pebbles, tree debris).

My budget is $3000 for everything including all parts."

I live with similar cycling conditions except that my roads are quite dry in summer. Winter riding presents some challenges especially in braking. My solution was to shop around for a race-oriented disc bike, one that can handle a tire size of at least 28mm. I like the concept behind the Specialized Diverge Expert at $3400, but didn't feel that it was much of a climber compared to my Supersix. What I finally settled on is a Giant TCR Advanced Pro Disc. Its geometry is similar to my Supersix, but it has hydraulic disc brakes and clearance for 28mm tires at least. It also came tubeless, so I can run lower tire pressure. Simply put, it's a complete road bike, fast and comfortable, and it's at home on the 10% to 20% gradients around the foothills of Northern California. I did have my LBS swap out the mid-compact chainrings for compact and I had them switch the RD to a medium cage with an 11-32 cassette (I'm nearly 67 years of age but still love to climb). I've had the TCR for some weeks now and have taken it out without hesitation after a night of rain when the roads were still wet in places. The wheels picked up moisture, but the disc brakes worked like a charm. For me, the problem is now solved so much so that I would actually consider just having one bike, but that violates Rule #12: The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.

I realize that the model I bought is beyond your price point, but there is the TCR Advanced Disc 1 model that you might consider for $2375. Giant also has the Defy Advanced Pro 1 for $3250, and it comes with a compact chainring and 11-32 cog.

I also looked at the Cannondale Synapse disc, but, once again, I prefer a race-oriented bike.
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