General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

cold weather tires

Reply

Old 12-06-16, 08:56 PM
  #1  
TreyWestgate
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 114

Bikes: motobecane outcast 29er singlespeed and nashbar singlespeed road bike

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
cold weather tires

Well something I heard was that if you ride a motorcycle that most motorcycle tires are made for warmer weather riding and won't have the traction on a cold road surface.

So I wondered if bike tires, say general road bike tires are designed more for warm weather riding or they're even game either way.

Naturally nothing has the traction that you will get in the warm and dry.

Are there bike tires aimed at warm weather or is that just specific to a motorcycle?.

Heard that Motorcycles have a glaze on the tires when new as well which gives a eye catching appearance but reduced traction.

have you ever heard of something so odd as that?

Glad if it doesn't apply to bikes.
TreyWestgate is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-16, 09:02 PM
  #2  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 14,506

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3376 Post(s)
Winter bike tires are great. Studded tires are excellent. Continental also makes a winter contact tire which works well.

http://www.continental-tires.com/bic...inter2-premium
bikemig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-16, 09:03 PM
  #3  
Shimagnolo
Senior Member
 
Shimagnolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zang's Spur, CO
Posts: 8,667
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1473 Post(s)
https://motorbikewriter.com/break-ne...orcycle-tyres/
Shimagnolo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 02:53 AM
  #4  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 8,299

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 139 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
That new tire glaze is pretty common (I remember it from new motorcycle tires too) and occurs on at least some bicycle tires. While it may look appealing on the shelf I suspect it's just a byproduct of the manufacturing process and mold release, and possibly to enhance shelf life without aging in non-air conditioned commercial warehouses and garages.

Both my Michelin and Innova tires with all terrain chevron tread patterns needed some break in riding to get the best road feel -- no slipping or squirming on turns, digging in on hard braking rather than slipping a bit. My Continental Speed Ride tires have a diamond file tread that felt pretty grippy and secure when new and didn't seem to need any break in.

My theory is that the optimal tire for overall safety (but not speed) in most-weather riding -- hot dry and cold dry pavement, wet pavement, moderate off road stuff like gravel and chat trails and reasonably dry mowed grass or weeds -- is a shallow tread, diamond file type pattern with many small segments (rather than the larger lugs of mountain bike tires with lots of space in between to avoid clumping up mud). The many smaller tread segments should warm up from friction even in cold weather, and displace water and some oil. That pretty much describes the Continental Speed Ride and Cyclocross Speed tires. No tread, or barely any tread = little friction, little warmup. Too heavy a tread, like mountain bike off road tires = not even contact with the pavement. Lots of finely segmented tread, shallow but enough to move around and warm up from friction = good grip in all temperatures and most road conditions.

Interestingly, and perhaps not coincidentally, Michelin's StarGrip urban tire has the same type of tread pattern and is specifically recommended for urban all weather usage, especially winter.

So far I'm very satisfied with the diamond file, multi-segmented tread for all around use, wet and dry, pavement and moderate off-road use. I've ridden several times in the rain and the tires felt very secure, despite the usual slippery oil on asphalt outside of the heavily ridden vehicle tire tracks. Ditto silted up mud puddles along our river trail -- in group rides I've seen other cyclists skid on those wet patches using slicks and barely-there tread tires (little more than artistic impressions in the tread), but my Continental Speed Rides, Michelin Protek Cross Max and Innova all terrain tires with heavy chevron tread tires handle those patches without drama.

But I'll bet my Continental Speed Rides and the similar Michelin StarGrip tires will wear faster too. Can't have all that friction and not get accelerated wear. Okay by me, the Conti's aren't very expensive.
canklecat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 06:23 AM
  #5  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 4,353

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
Forgetting dry vs wet, icy vs. not for the moment, I think OP is asking if there are eg. rubber formulation differences for tires to work better in cold (sub freezing) temperatures, vs warm ? (assuming for now we're just talking about completely dry and unfettered surfaces)
Sy Reene is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 06:39 AM
  #6  
02Giant 
Home School Valedictorian
 
02Giant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,612

Bikes: 13 Orbea Orca 02 Giant Cypress 88 Mongoose ATB

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 715 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Winter bike tires are great. Studded tires are excellent. Continental also makes a winter contact tire which works well.

continental bicycle Top CONTACT Winter II Premium
Have you used these^^^?
__________________
Excuse me if I, have some place in my mind,
Where I go time to time
02Giant is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 06:44 AM
  #7  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 14,506

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3376 Post(s)
Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
Have you used these^^^?
I run two different bikes in the winter. I use studded tires on one and I use the continental winter contact tires on the other. They're currently on my my stumpy mtb drop bar conversion. They're excellent tires in mixed snow, ice, and pavement. They are not as good as studded tires in bad road conditions but they are better all around tires. I believe it's the same compound/tire that conti uses for the car winter tires. I think of it as a high performance tire for crummy road conditions. I ride my stumpy drop bar mtb a lot as the weather gets worse.

Last edited by bikemig; 12-07-16 at 06:59 AM.
bikemig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 07:01 AM
  #8  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 14,506

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3376 Post(s)
This is my 1987 Stumpjumper Comp drop bar conversion; with the conti winter contact 26 x 1.9 tires, it makes a really fine foul weather all around bike:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
StumpCompContiTwoTires.jpg (99.7 KB, 184 views)
bikemig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 08:10 AM
  #9  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,076

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2786 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
Winter bike tires are great. Studded tires are excellent. Continental also makes a winter contact tire which works well.

continental bicycle Top CONTACT Winter II Premium
just saw they come in 700x42 ... sweet. almost look like cyclocross tires
rumrunn6 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 08:22 AM
  #10  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,108

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 744 Post(s)
Just like car tires, there are some bike tires made to stay soft and pliant in colder temps. I commute, and last winter was my first with studded snow tires (Suomi, nee Nokian). The studs let me traverse icy streets, but even on cold, wet surfaces they really were sticky.

One thing that helps, regardless of compound is to run your tires with a slightly lower psi. I rode on an icy uphill street last winter, alongside a guy with non-studded knobbies. He said he just let the air out to a point where they worked on most ice. Even with my own 26x1.9 studded snow tires, they really worked well on ice at 35 psi. Last night, in light snow but no ice I rode them at 45psi and they were still grippy. At 45psi they are slightly slower than their summer counterparts. At 35psi they are much slower.
BobbyG is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 09:19 AM
  #11  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 4,922

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 860 Post(s)
I don't change tires from winter to summer, although I don't cycle when there's snow or ice on the road. (If we're going to play bumper cars, I want a car, and a big heavy one, to play in!) I can't say that I've noticed much difference related to temperature, except that at really cold temps the tires don't soak up as much shock as when warm. But then I don't normally see how close to the edge I can ride without actually getting injured, either.
pdlamb is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 10:31 AM
  #12  
Wilfred Laurier
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 4,060
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
As mentioned above, Conti makes some non-studded cold weather tires. I have done loads of winter riding (-30C, snow, ice) and, except for on ice, I don't believe there is any need to use different tires than you would in a warmer season.
On Motorcycles it matters more because it is so easy to get to the limits of traction, but bicycles are usually much further from the limits, so it makes no difference in practice.

If there is ice, then I don't believe for one second that the Conti winter tires are appreciably better than any other non-studded tire... if there is ice you need studded tires or you will most likely be on your ass. But studded tires, possibly like glossy fresh-from-the-mold tires, have less traction than non studded tires on dry surfaces... but this also makes no difference in practice, unless you are intentionally testing the limits of traction with high speed corners and braking.
Wilfred Laurier is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 11:39 AM
  #13  
italktocats
Senior Member
 
italktocats's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 902
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
there are no winter vs summer motorcycles tires, nobody would be that stupid
italktocats is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 11:43 AM
  #14  
PepeM
Senior Member
 
PepeM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 6,606
Mentioned: 177 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2535 Post(s)
Indeed.

PepeM is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 12:03 PM
  #15  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,593

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6181 Post(s)
Yes Indeed..
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 12:07 PM
  #16  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,593

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6181 Post(s)
There is a super soft rubber compound Conti Uses for a winter studless tire, when it's warm they will wear down quickly.
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 12:19 PM
  #17  
thisisbenji
Senior Member
 
thisisbenji's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wadsworth, IL
Posts: 466

Bikes: Motobecane Vent Noir, Specialized Crux, Specialized Carve

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
While it's true that motorcycle tires have compounds that are best suited to warm weather it really has to do with how quickly they get up to temperature. For instance, a sport-touring tire will get up to temperature quicker in cold conditions than a track day tire, but the sport-touring tire will also get greasy quicker in hot conditions.

The thing with motorcycles is they do this to their tires.



So it's important to pick the proper compound to suit the type of riding you will be doing.

My bike with sport-touring tires is easy to drop a knee on when it's a bit chilly out on the street, but my bike that wears track day rubber is very sketchy when it's chilly out on the street. However, on a hot day at the track it's exactly the opposite.

Bicycles on the other hand, don't put those kind of stresses through the tires. Until you can drift through a dry corner under power with your bicycle the compound is soft enough.

Once you start dealing with things like snow then it's time to think about different tires, you're going to want something that actually bites into the ground via knobbies or studs.
thisisbenji is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 12:41 PM
  #18  
grizzly59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 218
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
I bike commuted in NoDak through the winter for years. Every mtb tire with lots of med-small knobs worked great, down to -40f. Use a fatter tire and run with a little less pressure. I've never used studs. Don't touch the front brake if the road is slick. Put Mobil-1 gear oil in the freehub, or else the pawls will freeze in the "coasting" position.
grizzly59 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 12:42 PM
  #19  
Shimagnolo
Senior Member
 
Shimagnolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zang's Spur, CO
Posts: 8,667
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1473 Post(s)
Ice tires for motorcycles;
Jump ahead to 2:00 to see them being ridden:
Shimagnolo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-16, 08:29 AM
  #20  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,830
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 926 Post(s)
A good coat of Armor All will keep your tires moving smoothly over a frozen surface,
shelbyfv is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-16, 05:28 PM
  #21  
Doug5150
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: IL-USA
Posts: 1,864
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
I have noticed while lurking many European bicycling forums, that there is a much greater concern for having "summer" tires and "winter" tires for "enthusiast" bicycling.

Two obvious reasons are just basic tread design, or the presence of studs or not--but a third reason is that many tires that have low rolling resistance in warmer temperatures experience a major change in that characteristic when the temperature is below freezing. The rolling resistance goes up a LOT when they get cold.

With other tires, they don't roll very well in warmer temperatures, but the rolling resistance increases much less as they get cold.

So the idea here is you use the former in the summer, and the latter in the winter.
Doug5150 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-16, 01:27 PM
  #22  
EcoBikeRider
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TreyWestgate View Post
Well something I heard was that if you ride a motorcycle that most motorcycle tires are made for warmer weather riding and won't have the traction on a cold road surface.

So I wondered if bike tires, say general road bike tires are designed more for warm weather riding or they're even game either way.

Naturally nothing has the traction that you will get in the warm and dry.

Are there bike tires aimed at warm weather or is that just specific to a motorcycle?.

Heard that Motorcycles have a glaze on the tires when new as well which gives a eye catching appearance but reduced traction.

have you ever heard of something so odd as that?

Glad if it doesn't apply to bikes.
I never really thought about it, but bikes don't really need the "slide grip" of taking a bend fast like car tires do. I usually don't take bends fast, because if your tire goes that would be the end of you doing 30MPH on a bike.
EcoBikeRider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-16, 02:03 PM
  #23  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 12,896

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 196 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5733 Post(s)
The OP is talking about rubber compound. The OP is not talking about tread pattern, studs or tires for ice/snow.

Ultra high performance car and motorcycle tires are not designed for the cold. This has nothing to do with rain or ice but the rubber compound and its operating temperature.

There is not such concept for road bike tires. In terms of temperature, just run your normal road tires and you will be OK.


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 12-17-16 at 02:37 PM.
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-16, 02:51 PM
  #24  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,830
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 926 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
The OP is talking about rubber compound. The OP is not talking about tread pattern, studs or tires for ice/snow.

Ultra high performance car and motorcycle tires are not designed for the cold. This has nothing to do with rain or ice but the rubber compound and its operating temperature.

There is not such concept for road bike tires. In terms of temperature, just run your normal road tires and you will be OK.


-Tim-
I think you are wrong about this. Michelin seems to say that this tire MICHELIN Pro4 Grip - Tires road | MICHELIN - Motorcycle - United States - Bike-website -->3 has a special compound effective in "whatever temperatures." Other companies also have four season tires. It's OK, though. We know this isn't a wardrobe thread

Last edited by shelbyfv; 12-17-16 at 07:03 PM.
shelbyfv is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-16, 04:59 PM
  #25  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,593

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 166 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6181 Post(s)
Super soft for grip at 0c will quickly wear out at 20c..
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service