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replaced tube for first time, valve a little slanted

Old 12-26-16, 04:19 PM
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MikeinFL
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replaced tube for first time, valve a little slanted

Got my first flat running over thumb tack. Found lots of vids showing how to patch. After watching patch vids and reading patch kit reviews that go from 1 to 5 stars I just got more confused if patches are a good idea. The Rema patches had highest rating.

Then when to LBS and found they do not offer to patch tubes. I found that surprising. They always recommend replacing the tube. Does your LBS patch tubes?

I need 700x38C. Walmart has those Bell brand for $3.88. That's cheaper then most patch kits. Are they ok?

Then I see the Bell self-sealing tubes at Walmart too. I check reviews online, and very mixed again. Works great for some, not others. One review had a tube split and the sealant made a mess on his wheels. I don't want that to ever happen so I decided to pass on those.

For my first every tube flat, I decided to not patch. Got a new sunlte tube and nice metal tire levers and save $5 doing it myself for the first time. LBS said use the levers to help take off the tire but never use it to put a tire on. It often pinches the tube. To only use thumbs. Well, that's what I did. I had found the thumb tack earlier. I got the new tube in the tire and pumped up, I'm back to riding.

The only thing is the air valve is a little slanted coming through the rim. Air is holding, but is that slant ok?


Last edited by MikeinFL; 12-31-16 at 08:47 AM.
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Old 12-26-16, 05:30 PM
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on learning to repair your bike.
Many LBSs don't patch tubes because they couldn't charge for the time, better to just replace. That slant probably won't do any harm, but I'd prefer to deflate the tire and correct it - if only for the looks...
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Old 12-26-16, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
Got my first flat running over thumb tack. Found lots of vids showing how to patch. After watching patch vids and reading patch kit reviews that go from 1 to 5 stars I just got more confused if patches are a good idea. The Rema patches had highest rating.

Then when to LBS and found they do not offer to patch tubes. I found that surprising. They always recommend replacing the tube. Does your LBS patch tubes?

I need 700x38C. Walmart has those Bell brand for $3.88. That's cheaper then most patch kits. Are they ok?

Then I see the Bell self-sealing tubes at Walmart too. I check reviews online, and very mixed again. Works great for some, not others. One review had a tube split and the sealant made a mess on his wheels. I don't want that to ever happen so I decided to pass on those.

For my first every tube flat, I decided to not patch. Got a new sunlte tube and nice metal tire levers and save $5 doing it myself for the first time. LBS said use the levers to help take off the tire but never use it to put a tire on. It often pinches the tube. To only use thumbs. Well, that's what I did. I had found the thumb tack earlier. I got the new tube in the tire and pumped up, I'm back to riding.

The only thing is the air valve is a little slanted coming through the rim. Air is holding, but is that slant ok?

Let the air out and center the valve.
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Old 12-26-16, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
Let the air out and center the valve.
easy enough, no more slant. thx!
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Old 12-26-16, 05:56 PM
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Congrats on repairing your first flat on your own.

I personally patch my tubes using the cheap patches on eBay, but I actually enjoy it and I don't like being wasteful. I always carry a spare tube and patch kit while riding. The spare tube is all I really need after a flat and I patch the tube later at home.
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Old 12-26-16, 06:12 PM
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Deflate it, then pinch the tube and tire at about 2 0'clock and tug it toward the stem. After a few tugs, about 3 inches apart, the stem should be centered.
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Old 12-26-16, 07:25 PM
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Be sure the label on the tire (if any) is centered with respect to the valve stem.
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Old 12-26-16, 07:42 PM
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I commute. I carry a patch kit and a tube. Out here in Colorado Springs we have "goat head" thorns. They leave little pin ******. I will patch those and save the "fresh" inner tube for more catastrophic ruptures, too big or severe to patch...like a torn valve stem which may or may not occur from a crooked valve stem, or when a nail or something tears the tube, or the tube gets old and a seam comes apart.

FYI, some tires are more puncture resistant than others, and then there are tire liners, like Mr. Tuffy's which I use. Went from a flat every couple of weeks, to a flat every six months or so.

Inner tubes can be inexpensive, but I am old-fashioned (and possibly cheap), and I like the idea of fixing 6 flats for two or three bucks. IMHO there is nothing wrong with replacing a puncture with a fresh inner tube, I just prefer to fix things when I can.
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Old 12-26-16, 07:53 PM
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I always carry a patch kit and patch my tires. I think it stems from when I was a kid and always patched my tires whenever I had a flat. It seems a waste to throw a tube away if it's just got a tiny hole which can be repaired.
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Old 12-26-16, 08:14 PM
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Talcum powder your tube. It will move easier when adjusting, should you need to...
Specialized has pre talc'd tubes. That is a nice feature, but probably not the cheapest tubes.
If you ever have a non talc'd tube stick or bond itself to your tire casing, you will never go without talcum powder again.
Happened to me once and I could barely release the tube from the tire casing while repairing a flat on the road. YMMV
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Old 12-26-16, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Be sure the label on the tire (if any) is centered with respect to the valve stem.
I released air and have the valve straight now but why does a label need to be centered with stem? esthetics? I don't see a label that's very noticeable.
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Old 12-26-16, 08:49 PM
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It's a rule: Velominati: The Rules (#40)

(In case it is too subtle -- that site is making fun of anal-retentive bike people).
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Old 12-26-16, 11:41 PM
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Centering valve stem under tire label

[QUOTE=MikeinFL;19272753]I released air and have the valve straight now but why does a label need to be centered with stem? esthetics? I don't see a label that's very noticeable.[/QUOTE
People mount their tires with the manufacturer's label aligned with the valve stem of their inner tube in order to have a reference point when looking for whatever object perforated the tire and tube. When you find the leak in the tube, you need to check the tire to be sure the sharp object is no longer there. Knowing that the valve stem was aligned with the label or some other feature on the tire tells you what part of the tire to look at.
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Old 12-27-16, 07:31 AM
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Don't worry about it. You did fine.
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Old 12-27-16, 12:15 PM
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[QUOTE=Dunkirk;19272948]
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
I released air and have the valve straight now but why does a label need to be centered with stem? esthetics? I don't see a label that's very noticeable.

[/QUOTE
People mount their tires with the manufacturer's label aligned with the valve stem of their inner tube in order to have a reference point when looking for whatever object perforated the tire and tube. When you find the leak in the tube, you need to check the tire to be sure the sharp object is no longer there. Knowing that the valve stem was aligned with the label or some other feature on the tire tells you what part of the tire to look at.
makes sense, will do next time. I did find the thumbtack and removed it
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Old 12-27-16, 01:01 PM
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I think psi lost 30lbs over night on my new sunlite tube. Pretty sure I pumped to 50, this morning it's at 20. That's not normal, right? I'll check again tomorrow morning.
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Old 12-27-16, 01:09 PM
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Shouldn't lose any air overnight. (more or less) Certainly not 30 psi, or 20 or 10 or 5.

I usually carry a tube and self-adhesive patches when I ride. If I flat, the tube is replaced. If I flat twice, a patch is used. Non-patched tubes are patched at home with traditional patches using vulcanizing fluid.
Very seldom have flats. (Sound of rapping on head.)
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Old 12-27-16, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
I usually carry a tube and self-adhesive patches when I ride. If I flat, the tube is replaced. If I flat twice, a patch is used. Non-patched tubes are patched at home with traditional patches using vulcanizing fluid.
Very seldom have flats. (Sound of rapping on head.)
Good plan ... same one I use.

Self-stick patches are temporary and might not hold high pressure in my experience, but will get me home. Then I replace them with real patches.

I never buy those tiny, overpriced patch kits. I have bought large sheets of patch rubber (4"x6" I think) to cut my own patches, and I also buy patches in bulk off Ebay, I buy them by the several dozen for a couple dollars. Cement off Ebay too.

Patching tubes is quick and easy and a Lot cheaper than always swapping in new tubes.

As for alignment---I agree that the only reason is to make it easy to find the source of the leak. What i saw once which made sense was to line up the valve with the text on the tire advising on pressure ranges---since I often ride different bikes I sometimes forget which tires are good for which pressure, and having the info right by the valve makes it easy to find.
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Old 12-27-16, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
on learning to repair your bike.
Many LBSs don't patch tubes because they couldn't charge for the time, better to just replace. That slant probably won't do any harm, but I'd prefer to deflate the tire and correct it - if only for the looks...
An lbs wont patch because they have to guarantee the repair. I patch my tubes but often the repair doesnt work and I have to patch again. No big deal for me. But if an lbs patched instead of repla ced many repairs would come back.

After working at an lbs I quickly learned that the cheap customers were the ones that complained the most and the loudest.

My boss would replace the tube for the retail price of the tube and on the spot. Customers were always happy.
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Old 12-27-16, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
An lbs wont patch because they have to guarantee the repair. I patch my tubes but often the repair doesnt work and I have to patch again. No big deal for me. But if an lbs patched instead of repla ced many repairs would come back.

After working at an lbs I quickly learned that the cheap customers were the ones that complained the most and the loudest.

My boss would replace the tube for the retail price of the tube and on the spot. Customers were always happy.
How so? I've patched hundreds of tubes and very, very few failed. Probably less % than new tubes.
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Old 12-27-16, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
How so? I've patched hundreds of tubes and very, very few failed. Probably less % than new tubes.
Ok, not often but occasionally. Point is the lbs cant be bothered with patching because he doesnt want someone to come back with a complaint.
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Old 12-27-16, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
How so? I've patched hundreds of tubes and very, very few failed. Probably less % than new tubes.
what's your patch method?
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Old 12-27-16, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
How so? I've patched hundreds of tubes and very, very few failed. Probably less % than new tubes.
I also have patched mucho tubes over six decades and never had a patch fail. An LBS that can't patch a tube without issues is an LBS to avoid.
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Old 12-27-16, 07:20 PM
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LBS do not patch tubes due to it not being cost effective. A patch would take about 15 minutes, but they can't charge over the cost of a new tube as customers would just want a new tube to begin with.

Now I could see an LBS selling used patched tubes at a discount, but tube manufactures may cut their supply if they find out. I'd like to think the used tubes get patched and donated, but I know most probably just end up in the dumpster.
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Old 12-27-16, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
LBS do not patch tubes due to it not being cost effective. A patch would take about 15 minutes, but they can't charge over the cost of a new tube as customers would just want a new tube to begin with.
Approx. 13 of the 15 minutes would involve removing wheel from bike, getting tire off the rim installing new or patched tube, inflation, remount wheel on bike; only 2 minutes to patch tube. If an LBS is giving away 13 minutes of free labor just to earn the profit from a new bike tube, it won't be in business for long.
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