Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

frequent sidewalk biking effect on bike?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

frequent sidewalk biking effect on bike?

Old 01-05-17, 11:04 PM
  #1  
MikeinFL
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
frequent sidewalk biking effect on bike?

Anyone ride on sidewalks a lot? Does it deteriorate a bike a lot faster because of constant small bumps? Or it's nothing to worry about?

When I'm riding around my neighborhood areas, which is almost daily, there are no bike paths on the street and I have no choice but to ride on sidewalks, about 80% of the time. I ride for leisure and store trips on my new cheap bikesdirect hybrid, only a month old. it's riding great now. However sidewalks are a lot bumpier then the street, although mostly small bumps, and it rides fine on the sidewalk.

But I'm wondering if the constant bumps is something very bad, not too bad, or nothing to worry about? Just make sure screws stay tight? Or am I wearing this bike down much faster?
MikeinFL is offline  
Old 01-05-17, 11:10 PM
  #2  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 11,480

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5409 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 49 Posts
Your bike will last a long, long time. Yes, always keep on eye on what needs tightening, what needs cleaning, and what needs lubrication. Then ride the thing.

Unless you are topping a couple hundred mph on those sidewalks, your bike will not mind the bumps at all.

If the ride is Extremely rough, you can look at slightly lowering the tire pressure.

The big issue with sidewalks are cars pulling out, and pedestrians. Bumps ... enjoy them or ignore them.

Watch a downhill mountain bike race sometime. Those guys go 40 mph down slopes that would you literally could not walk down unassisted, banging through piles of rocks and roots that seem unrideable.

I'd check the tire pressure. if it recommends, say, 90 psi, try riding at 75.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 07:59 AM
  #3  
digibud
Senior Member
 
digibud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Further North than U
Posts: 1,993

Bikes: Spec Roubaix, three Fisher Montare, two Pugs

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If the bumps/cracks are enough to feel a jarring bump and they happen frequently then the most common place they may affect would be the headset bearings. If you gently rotate your headset and can feel spots where it seems to bump bump bump it may be the bearing as they dent the cups. Since those bearings mostly just sit there they tend to wear a "spot" and that may need repair but it may take thousands of miles. As for keeping scews tight, that's always important and if you have racks or fenders, put a dab of blue loctite on the screws after cleaning them.
digibud is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 08:01 AM
  #4  
MikeinFL
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Your bike will last a long, long time. Yes, always keep on eye on what needs tightening, what needs cleaning, and what needs lubrication. Then ride the thing.

Unless you are topping a couple hundred mph on those sidewalks, your bike will not mind the bumps at all.

If the ride is Extremely rough, you can look at slightly lowering the tire pressure.

The big issue with sidewalks are cars pulling out, and pedestrians. Bumps ... enjoy them or ignore them.

Watch a downhill mountain bike race sometime. Those guys go 40 mph down slopes that would you literally could not walk down unassisted, banging through piles of rocks and roots that seem unrideable.

I'd check the tire pressure. if it recommends, say, 90 psi, try riding at 75.
thanks, I know mountain bikes can handle sidewalks easy, wasn't sure how a cheap china frame hybrid bike will.
MikeinFL is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 08:06 AM
  #5  
Juan Foote
LBKA (formerly punkncat)
 
Juan Foote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jawja
Posts: 3,430

Bikes: Spec Roubaix SL4, GT Traffic 1.0

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 942 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
thanks, I know mountain bikes can handle sidewalks easy, wasn't sure how a cheap china frame hybrid bike will.

Not sure if troll or not, but I will throw a hunk of flesh....

These "cheap China" frames you are talking about supply a larger portion of the industry than don't. Most manufacturers purchase from the exact same places in China/Taiwan and by many are considered the modern leaders in Al frame production, as well as CF for price/performance. My Spec Roubaix SL4 had a "Made in Taiwan" sticker on it. I don't think anyone can dispute what a good bike it's been in performance and popularity.
Juan Foote is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 08:08 AM
  #6  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 2,634

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, 81 miyata 912 and 86 miyata 312.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 811 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
thanks, I know mountain bikes can handle sidewalks easy, wasn't sure how a cheap china frame hybrid bike will.
Your bike will last a long time on bumps and frankly most bikes are made in China now. My sister has a bikes direct bike and its been great. You could do much worse.
52telecaster is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 08:27 AM
  #7  
MikeinFL
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
Not sure if troll or not, but I will throw a hunk of flesh....

These "cheap China" frames you are talking about supply a larger portion of the industry than don't. Most manufacturers purchase from the exact same places in China/Taiwan and by many are considered the modern leaders in Al frame production, as well as CF for price/performance. My Spec Roubaix SL4 had a "Made in Taiwan" sticker on it. I don't think anyone can dispute what a good bike it's been in performance and popularity.
I meant "cheap" as in low cost. The frame on my bike looks very solid and dependable. How was it I was able to purchase a very decent new hybrid with very decent components for under $310? Do I have something sub standard on my bike?:

Frame
HandCrafted 6061 Aluminum with replaceable derailleur hanger and H2O bosses

Fork
SunTour SF11-M3010AL, ALLOY SILVER CROWN,ALLOY BRACE SUSPENSION FORK, Aluminum Alloy CROWN

Stem/Headset
Kalloy Aluminum ADJUSTABLE ANGLE QUILL:180mm long, EXT:16"ML*90mm, 18"ML/ 20"M/ 22"M*110mm, / Ball Bearing STEEL,Chrome Polished, ID25.4

Derailleurs
FRONT, SHIMANO FD-TZ31 31.8MM DOWN PULL/ REAR, SHIMANO ACERA RDM360SGSL SILVER

Shifters/ Cassette
SHIMANO ST-EF51 SILVER 21-SP. / SHIMANO MF-TZ31 14-34T-7 INDEX

Brakes/ Levers
C.STAR ALLOY SILVER V-BRAKE LINEAR PULL / Shimano

Hubs
ALLOY QR, 21-Speed

Rims
700c wheels KENDA 700x38C BLACK A/V K-184

Crank/Bottom Bracket
SR SUNTOUR 28/38/48T,SILVER CRANK, W/BLACK C.G,W/CAPLESS BOLT, ALL SIZES-170L / SEALED BALL BEARING

Saddle/Grips
Special Spring-Web with Comfort Channel / Comfort Kraton

Seatpost/ Handlebar
HL SP-91 350MM ALLOY SILVER Comfort-SUSPENSION / Medium Rise 640x80x6D, 25.4mm

Pedals/Chain
9/16" BORON AXLE, KRATON Inserts / KMC Z-72 1/2"*3/32"

Tires
700c wheels KENDA 700x38C BLACK A/V K-184
MikeinFL is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 08:34 AM
  #8  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,217
Mentioned: 162 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8443 Post(s)
Liked 233 Times in 150 Posts
Or you could simply ride in the street.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 09:56 AM
  #9  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,947
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 812 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The thing to watch for in that bike is the rear wheel. 7-speed freewheels have a longer part of the axle protruding outside the wheel bearing, making them more prone to axles bending/breaking than a cassette hub with the same speeds.
dabac is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 10:22 AM
  #10  
Milton Keynes
Senior Member
 
Milton Keynes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 2,469

Bikes: Two-wheeled human-powered vehicles, but that's not important right now

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1057 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Any time you ride on bumpy terrain it will shake things loose faster than riding on smooth pavement. Just keep checking once in a while to make sure everything is tightened the way it should be.

Rode a lot of gravel on Sunday and at a stop I noticed that one of my taillights was about to fall off. Just needed a couple of screws tightened so the mount would hold it again. I'm not saying all the vibration from the gravel roads shook it loose that day, but I'm sure it helped.
Milton Keynes is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 10:40 AM
  #11  
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Posts: 2,102

Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
When I taught the safety section of Cycling Merit Badge to Scouts I would always tell kids that if they are going to ride on sidewalks they should consider themselves invisible and ride accordingly. We have enough problems with distracted drivers who barely see you on the road. You are traveling faster than a pedestrian and drivers may not see you approaching a driveway or street as you ride the sidewalk. It may not just be the bike that gets destroyed over time. I consider myself a pretty careful driver and do watch for cyclists but I nearly hit an adult on a bike who crossed in front of me. I was checking in both directions but he came upon me so fast that I didn't see him until I started out because the last check was to the left.
VegasTriker is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 11:52 AM
  #12  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,900

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 883 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
When I taught the safety section of Cycling Merit Badge to Scouts I would always tell kids that if they are going to ride on sidewalks they should consider themselves invisible and ride accordingly.
Moreover, at intersections car drivers are looking for pedestrians, who travel at pedestrian speeds. If you're traveling at even 10 mph, that's 3x walking speed so you can suddenly appear in front of them from way beyond the distance they've scanned for possible conflicts. There's also the complication that, while pedestrians may have the right-of-way in a crosswalk, cyclists are not pedestrians. Your state may give you special rights; but for most of us, bikes are treated as vehicles and are expected to be in the road. Bottom line is, if you're not extra-careful, you could be put in the hospital, your bike totaled, and get a ticket and be liable for damages because it was your fault.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 12:05 PM
  #13  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,464

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6721 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 139 Times in 117 Posts
Some one pulling out of their driveway and hitting you, on your Bike , on the sidewalks,
Moving faster than walking speed, is where the damage can happen.


There is a Stretch of 4 lane Highway 1/2 block down hill from my house ,
I ride a few blocks on the sidewalk along side that Highway (against the traffic flow) ,
as It is Flat and I dont have to cross 4 lanes of traffic when I get to my street.
the next street , goes up hill ..

riding slowly and giving way to pedestrians is expected.



...

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-06-17 at 01:59 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 01:19 PM
  #14  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 15,450

Bikes: RANS V3 ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 461 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Or you could simply ride in the street.
Bingo!
__________________
RANS V3 Ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
JanMM is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 01:38 PM
  #15  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 37,969

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1794 Post(s)
Liked 101 Times in 60 Posts
Regularly riding on the sidewalk subjects your bike to a much greater likelihood of a catastrophic event: Destruction by a collision with a car pulling into or out of a driveway.
caloso is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 01:43 PM
  #16  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 18,898
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7668 Post(s)
Liked 117 Times in 68 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
Anyone ride on sidewalks a lot? Does it deteriorate a bike a lot faster because of constant small bumps? Or it's nothing to worry about?
It won't harm your bike, but now you have to worry about all the people on the sidewalk. You're not allowed to run into them, but they're allowed to be oblivious, to step right in front of you (and it's your fault if you hit them or crash as a result), etc. And there's something much more dangerous you have to worry about: every driveway that crosses the sidewalk. Suddenly those are uncontrolled intersections when you ride on the sidewalk. Drivers aren't looking for you there.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 03:29 PM
  #17  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 8,819

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2676 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 58 Posts
Most of our paved foot/bike trails are just sidewalks. Built the same way. Same seams every few feet. Same ridiculously narrow configuration. Same competition with other users for the same narrow space.

Regarding the jarring, no big deal. Still not as bad as chip seal roads.
canklecat is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 03:36 PM
  #18  
1989Pre 
Standard Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Posts: 2,731

Bikes: 2001 Raleigh M80, 1989 Raleigh Technium, 1983 F. Moser Sprint, 1963 Freddie Grubb Routier, 1948 P. Barnard & Son

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 692 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You have a suspension fork and a suspension seatpost, so you have nothing to worry about. Just remember to always ride extremely slowly on sidewalks (1-2mph) and never when there are pedestrians present.
Your bike sounds like it is decent. If you can not afford a "professional" mechanic right now, take an allen wrench if you can find the right size and go around wherever you see an allen bolt and see if it is tight. They should stay a long time if tight.
1989Pre is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 04:26 PM
  #19  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 5,875

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 828 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
Anyone ride on sidewalks a lot? Does it deteriorate a bike a lot faster because of constant small bumps? Or it's nothing to worry about?

When I'm riding around my neighborhood areas, which is almost daily, there are no bike paths on the street and I have no choice but to ride on sidewalks, about 80% of the time. I ride for leisure and store trips on my new cheap bikesdirect hybrid, only a month old. it's riding great now. However sidewalks are a lot bumpier then the street, although mostly small bumps, and it rides fine on the sidewalk.

But I'm wondering if the constant bumps is something very bad, not too bad, or nothing to worry about? Just make sure screws stay tight? Or am I wearing this bike down much faster?
No, I try to stay away from sidewalks. Not because of my bike but because it is extremely dangerous, and in some towns and cities, illegal. Street, bike lane, or MUP for me.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 09:13 PM
  #20  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sunnyvale, CA USA
Posts: 5,661
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 258 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
Anyone ride on sidewalks a lot? Does it deteriorate a bike a lot faster because of constant small bumps? Or it's nothing to worry about?
It bends wheels and frames when you get hit by cars at driveways and intersections where their drivers aren't looking for some one moving faster than walking speed, especially when you're going opposite their direction of travel.

When I'm riding around my neighborhood areas, which is almost daily, there are no bike paths on the street and I have no choice but to ride on sidewalks, about 80% of the time.
If there are any driveways or intersections on the sidewalk it's safer to use the road even if it doesn't have shoulders which is rarely the case - there's only one road like that near me with no room for shoulders because they ran light rail tracks between two car lanes in each direction.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 09:27 PM
  #21  
MikeinFL
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
here's a typical road near me with no bike lane:



This is one of the busiest roads in the area, this google pic is a rare slow time.

I understand and mostly agree what others say about sidewalk risks from cars not expecting bikes on the sidewalk, but on this road, and others like it, I feel a lot more in danger on the road. In fact, I've never seen a biker on this road, not once. Only on the sidewalk.

Last edited by MikeinFL; 01-06-17 at 09:33 PM.
MikeinFL is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 10:15 PM
  #22  
GravelMN
Senior Member
 
GravelMN's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Rural Minnesota
Posts: 1,604
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I find that my bike gets very depressed after prolonged sidewalk riding.
GravelMN is offline  
Old 01-06-17, 11:58 PM
  #23  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 11,480

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5409 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 49 Posts
I have been thinking about this and watching the sidewalk riders I see. I have come to the conclusion that some folks feel safer and actually might be safer on the sidewalks. It takes significant confidence and experience to be safe in traffic, and until a rider feels s/he is ready, the stress might actually make everybody less safe.

Ride where you feel safest. You can get hammered by an idiot in your living room ... no place is Truly safe. Ride where you feel most comfortable, and be aware of the specific dangers each scenario presents.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 01-07-17, 01:17 AM
  #24  
Ty0604
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,157

Bikes: 2017 Fuji Jari

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have severe hatred for anyone over the age of 16 who rides on a sidewalk

Last edited by Ty0604; 01-07-17 at 10:40 PM.
Ty0604 is offline  
Old 01-07-17, 06:42 AM
  #25  
02Giant 
Home School Valedictorian
 
02Giant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,672

Bikes: 13 Orbea Orca 02 Giant Cypress 88 Mongoose ATB

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 755 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeinFL View Post
Anyone ride on sidewalks a lot? Does it deteriorate a bike a lot faster because of constant small bumps? Or it's nothing to worry about?

When I'm riding around my neighborhood areas, which is almost daily, there are no bike paths on the street and I have no choice but to ride on sidewalks, about 80% of the time. I ride for leisure and store trips on my new cheap bikesdirect hybrid, only a month old. it's riding great now. However sidewalks are a lot bumpier then the street, although mostly small bumps, and it rides fine on the sidewalk.

But I'm wondering if the constant bumps is something very bad, not too bad, or nothing to worry about? Just make sure screws stay tight? Or am I wearing this bike down much faster?
You are not hurting your bike in any way riding over the bumpy pavement. Regular pre or post ride checks will keep your bike in ride-able condition, I prefer post ride as it will be ready next time I am.

Ride where ever you are most comfortable.
__________________
Excuse me if I, have some place in my mind,
Where I go time to time
02Giant is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.