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Is there a knack to refitting a Quick Release front Wheel

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Is there a knack to refitting a Quick Release front Wheel

Old 02-03-17, 02:02 PM
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SamBike
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Is there a knack to refitting a Quick Release front Wheel

Is there a preferred method of refitting a quick release front wheel.

I've taken my front wheel off so that it made it easier to put my bike into my car. Ive refitted the wheel but noticed that although secure the wheel didn't seem to turn as freely as the rear wheel.

It took me about eight times to slacken off the tension and then relighten and secure with the clip on the skewer. The front wheel now spins freely and doesn't come to an abrupt stop.

I'm not sure what I did differently on the 8th attempt, was it luck or judgement, I'm not sure.

So is there a specific way that this should be done ?
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Old 02-03-17, 02:04 PM
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Just be sure the tire clears the brakes.
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Old 02-03-17, 02:25 PM
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put the wheel in the fork ends(or dropouts if its the rear wheel) and place the wheel on the ground. that will align the hub and quick release so its even on both sides and sitting properly in the fork ends. If the wheel doesnt turn freely, its most likely angled and rubbing the brake.
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Old 02-03-17, 02:31 PM
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You'd have to really clamp the Q/R skewer down a lot to compress the bearings and bind the wheel. More likely you just had the wheel off-center and rubbing one pad. The standard method seems to be put the wheel in the dropouts, slightly snug the Q/R with the nut, make sure the axle is bottomed out on both dropouts, then throw the lever to lock the wheel in place. The final step is to actuate the front brake once, pick up the front of the bike, spin the wheel, make sure it spins OK and stops with the brake. Sometimes the caliper gets nudged to one side or the other but actuating it should re-center it. And of course, you always test the wheel before you get 20 miles from the car.
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Old 02-03-17, 02:44 PM
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I do (or make sure it is done) 3 things. 1) Have fork ends that allow the wheel to be vertical and centered in the brake blocks with the bike on the floor and simply being held and sitting solidly on the front hub's axle with the quick release open. 2) I use wheels with no dish and 3) I do not tighten the quick release except when the bike is on the floor as described above. That way I know the hub axle is seated against the tops of the fork ends. This means the front wheel is always in the same place when I tighten the QR.

2) Front wheels with no dish is a no-brainer but there are a surprising number of wheels out there that that flunk. That brings us to 1). If the forks are not symmetrical side to side, someone could have built a dished wheel to get the rim centered on the bike. That wheel looks and operated just fine. But a proper wheel will sit crooked unless the wheel is rocked to one side before closing the QR. If that is happening, do some real diagnostics before you start cold-setting and filing. If you don't have these skills, go to a good shop.

Easy check for 2) wheel dish. Make sure the wheel is fully seated in the fork ends. Note where the rim sits relative to the fork below the crown. Turn the wheel around so the quick release is on the other side. Look again. On a proper wheel, the rim will be in exactly the same place.

There are thousands of bikes out there that don't pass this test. They are still perfectly ridable. When you go to put the front wheel on, hold the rim evenly between the brake blocks (or centered under the fork crown) Make sure you can feel the bike sitting solidly on one of the fork ends. Tighten the QR. Not ideal but that has been done probably a few million times.

Ben
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Old 02-03-17, 02:44 PM
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Your rim was probably rubbing a brake pad, which means you probably didn't have the wheel's axle seated all the way into the fork ends on both sides.

When I install a front wheel, I clamp the QR with the bike upright and its weight squarely on the wheel's axle to help ensure the axle's all the way into the fork ends.
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Old 02-03-17, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
put the wheel in the fork ends(or dropouts if its the rear wheel) and place the wheel on the ground. that will align the hub and quick release so its even on both sides and sitting properly in the fork ends.
This isn't always the case. Depending on the quality of the bike/fork...even with good quality bikes/forks. In some cases one of the dropouts might be welded/brazed/glued in just a fraction higher/lower than its mate. Or, one side of the fork could be a fraction short/long. In either case that fraction could result in the outer edge of the wheel to be noticably offset. Therefore, I think it's better to insert the wheel, and with the quick release open...hold the wheel centered in the fork and then close the quick release. Sheldon Brown says that the quick release should just be tight enough that the handle makes a slight impression on your hand when you close it. If the wheel doesn't spin freely because it's too tight...open the quick release and back the nut off about a half-turn each time until it does spin freely when closed.

Dan
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Old 02-03-17, 03:04 PM
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^ Yes. I also make sure none of my bikes have any protrusions on the dropouts that require the QR to be unscrewed before removing the wheel. That way the QR only needs to be adjusted to the proper tension once and subsequent removals and insertions only involve flipping the lever open or closed.
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Old 02-03-17, 03:42 PM
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Thanks for all the replies, really useful as I'm just going up cycling again and not had a bike with quick release before or even brake disks. I've got the wheel spinning freely now but will check again after a few miles. I will take particular care to ensure the seating is correct.
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Old 02-03-17, 03:48 PM
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I don't have any disc brake bikes but as far as the quick realease.....

I apply a bit of pressure to the fork so it seats in the drop outs properly.

I tighten the nut just enough so that the lever will not spin clockwise with much pressure. If it does, I open it and turn the nut a bit more. Sometimes even a 1/16 of a turn if the lever is barely able to spin.

Any more than that is not necessary. It will be too tight on the bearings.

Don't use the lever to tighten it though, while in the closed position. I just give it a little push to verify it does not spin freely.

Once tightened, I will place the valve at a 9 oclock or oclock position and let the wheel spin on it's own to verify the lever is not too tight. Should spin freely like a pendulum.
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Old 02-03-17, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by ClydeTim View Post
I don't have any disc brake bikes but as far as the quick realease.....

I apply a bit of pressure to the fork so it seats in the drop outs properly.

I tighten the nut just enough so that the lever will not spin clockwise with much pressure. If it does, I open it and turn the nut a bit more. Sometimes even a 1/16 of a turn if the lever is barely able to spin.

Any more than that is not necessary. It will be too tight on the bearings.


Don't use the lever to tighten it though, while in the closed position. I just give it a little push to verify it does not spin freely.

Once tightened, I will place the valve at a 9 oclock or oclock position and let the wheel spin on it's own to verify the lever is not too tight. Should spin freely like a pendulum.
If this is a bike with a traditional QR lever and a front disk - take note! The QR HAS TO BE SECURE!!! Physics. If you do a hard stop, that stopping force MUST be resisted at the dropout. But with a disc brake behind the axle, that force is down!!! In other words, trying to force your front wheel out of the dropout!!!

Go back to my second post above. New bike? Very likely the hub bearings came from the factory too tight. The shop may or may not have backed them off a hair. If not, you should. That QR must be good and tight or we may be hearing from you through your SO or the local paper. Rear brakes don't have this issue. The rotors are in front and the force is up. All good. Bike manufacturers could put the front brake in front of the fork and eliminate the issue but it would look dorky (and catch in branches with MTB use and that is where discs started).

This issue is why through axles are coming into play. Much more forgiving of user inattention.

Ben
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Old 02-03-17, 04:46 PM
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In some parts of the world, forks are supplied on road bikes without lawyers lips on the dropouts*. This makes taking off and putting on the front wheel much, much easier, because the QR doesn't have to be unscrewed-screwed up every time (no QR in my experience undoes the lever sufficiently far enough to clear the lips without having to undo the acorn nut a couple of times).

It makes lining up the axle in the dropouts easier, too... at least in my experience, because the QR cannot get caught on the lips.

I'd suggest filing them off (as I have done with the majority of the dropouts on my bikes) but that might be regarded as irresponsible advice.

* FWIW, the forks supplied with two Thorn Club Tour bikes from the UK did not have lawyers lips on them. Also, I have left the lips on the MTBs in the household for reasons to do with the terrain they encounter and the fact they have disc brakes.
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Old 02-03-17, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
If this is a bike with a traditional QR lever and a front disk - take note!
Ben


Originally Posted by ClydeTim View Post
I don't have any disc brakes
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