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Dual Purpose Pedals or Stick to Flats?

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Dual Purpose Pedals or Stick to Flats?

Old 02-06-17, 11:21 PM
  #1  
DarKris
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Dual Purpose Pedals or Stick to Flats?

I plan on upgrading my bike pedals and I'm currently debating between the XLC PD-S02 Platform/SPD pedal and the Raceface Chester.

Currently I am a College student and most of my riding around campus sees no need for clipless, however since I'm in my last full semester I will more than likely see myself transitioning to more of a pure rec style rider.

Additional info: I ride a Cyclocross bike, but I do urban/bike path/trail riding primarily. No Cyclocross for me.

The XLC pedals seem beneficial to me because of the option to run clipless in the future without forcing me to buy cleats/clipless specific pedals. The Raceface pedals are durable, lightweight, and fully serviceable.

So back to the main question: If I am buying new pedals (which I will) should I get pedals that allow the option for platforms and clipless if I am unsure or should I stick with pure flats?

PS: If you suggest another option/pedal, please keep the price under $50. Thanks.
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Old 02-07-17, 12:35 AM
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Hybrid pedals let you choose which shoes you ride in, from SPD-type to Teva sandals or hiking boots. I use clipless on some bikes, BMX platforms on a 3-speed and the hybrids on a touring bike.

I stocked up back when I was repping; several VP-101 clipless and the VP-131 hybrid.

Last edited by thumpism; 02-07-17 at 12:39 AM.
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Old 02-07-17, 12:55 AM
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Dual pedals are the best of both or the worst or either in my opinion. A member was recently discussing how he kept slipping of his flats in wet weather. Perhaps it was due to the lack of grip on them as he said, or perhaps he hadn't backed off on the power and style and was pedaling as though he was clipped.

It's something you have to consider I think. Can you really ride with one style of pedaling for days and then on the same bike switch to one where you have a whole lot less traction on the pedals? Can you consciously keep the power under wraps, change to a downward only stroke and remember to think about where your feet are?
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Old 02-07-17, 03:05 AM
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I have them on many of my bikes because I like the option of wearing different shoes/boots.

No problem switching back and forth - physics and muscle memory kick in and I don't have to give any thought to how I pedal. Just to "hey, I'm clipped" when I stop.
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Old 02-07-17, 05:52 AM
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This is a good resource for pedals and are available from Amazon or EBay.
http://mkspedal.com/
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Old 02-07-17, 06:28 AM
  #6  
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I use mks lambda platforms and frankly I havnt felt the need to ever look back to clipless or clips and straps. Its quite liberating really. Somebody NAD them for under 50.00 online.
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Old 02-07-17, 06:55 AM
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Shimano PD-M324 SPD Dual Platform Pedal


I have had the pedal mentioned above on both of my bike for years. Slipping off when wet is not an issue with these. They are durable due to being metal.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by 52telecaster View Post
I use mks lambda platforms and frankly I havnt felt the need to ever look back to clipless or clips and straps. Its quite liberating really. Somebody NAD them for under 50.00 online.
Those look interesting. I was looking at the Pedalling innovations Catalyst pedais that are just as long last the Lambda's but a bit more costly. I'm anxious to try out long pedals considering how big my feet are.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:35 AM
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I use these: Nashbar Soho Pedals
I just use these without the clips but, you can clip in on the other side. Only 30.99 and free shipping if you buy something else and spend 49.99. Pretty good deal.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:36 AM
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I will be the Debbie downer here....I hated the dual pedals. Had shimano A530 and didn't like them at all. They were not very good as flats and the clip in side was not designed well enough to be be right side up when needed. the only pedals I tried were these before just going for M9000. I did not try any other dual sided pedals either.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by DarKris View Post
Those look interesting. I was looking at the Pedalling innovations Catalyst pedais that are just as long last the Lambda's but a bit more costly. I'm anxious to try out long pedals considering how big my feet are.
I've got 1000's of miles and the bearings are still great. I bought them for the length as well.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by churnman View Post
Shimano PD-M324 SPD Dual Platform Pedal


I have had the pedal mentioned above on both of my bike for years. Slipping off when wet is not an issue with these. They are durable due to being metal.
I have a set of these, currently on my wife's old Peugeot touring bike. While I also own some Wellgo knockoffs, the Shimano version of this pedal is just a bit nicer, and online the price is around $40. I don't see how you can go wrong. The platform side is very good for using with regular shoes and the SPD side works very well indeed. But, once you make the switch to clipless, you will probably not look back.
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Old 02-07-17, 08:04 AM
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I use a slightly different twist, as I prefer clipless, I have mountain bike style SPD peddles on my touring/errand bike and use a pr. of nice (read , clean) casual mountain style shoes, to walk in. KB
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Old 02-07-17, 08:29 AM
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I have both the M324s and the T780s. They're fine but IMO dedicated flats or dual sided SPDs are better in every way.

This comes down to personal preference. I recommend just sticking with platforms. Pinned platforms work just fine for rec to serious rec riding and give you the option of using any shoes you want. IMO they're a better option in lots of situations. I would get the Chesters or something like the VP Vice.

If you've got your heart set on SPDs, I would get the Chesters and a set of M520s or M540s. That would be a great setup for ~$80 and swapping pedals takes no time at all.
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Old 02-07-17, 08:56 AM
  #15  
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One pair of each. Too many comprimises with a 'hybrid' pedal, and swapping takes no time. I keep the appropriate wrenches in the Rubbermaid container I keep the extra pedals in. I also use ARP thread sealant as an anti-seize, to make removal easier.

Since you're not riding clipless now, but 'later,' get a descent set of platforms now. The Raceface are a good pick.

All of my bikes have BMX platforms as their 'daily' pedals, even the road bike, with Look or SPD's for 'serious' rides.
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Old 02-07-17, 09:04 AM
  #16  
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I've got two kinds of Shimano dual-sided SPD pedals, the A530's and M324's.

The A530's are on my do-it-all kind of bike. It's a cyclocross bike with a rack so it gets ridden whenever panniers are handy: long gravel rides, errands around town, whatever. It also has lower gearing than my road bike, so it sometimes sees hill duty. It's nice to be able to throw sandals on for a ride to the park with my kids, or to put MTB shoes on to clip in for a 20 mile gravel ride. Same bike, same pedals. So I totally see the upside of these pedals.

BUT... The platform side of the A530's is slippery. Especially when wet. And they feel narrow. They're OK for leisurely pedaling around town, but a little annoying for anything more than that. I don't have a problem with the SPD side. Rotate the pedal with my toe if necessary and clip in.

I've got M324's on the MTB my wife uses. The platform side of these pedals feels MUCH more stable and secure. The down side to these pedals, compared to the A530's, is that they're chunkier and heavier.
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Old 02-07-17, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by kcblair View Post
I use a slightly different twist, as I prefer clipless, I have mountain bike style SPD peddles on my touring/errand bike and use a pr. of nice (read , clean) casual mountain style shoes, to walk in. KB
I always hated carrying around a different set of shoes. I would use something that i can clip in to and be able to walk in. I also don't intend on shelling out money right away for cleats.

Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
I've got M324's on the MTB my wife uses. The platform side of these pedals feels MUCH more stable and secure. The down side to these pedals, compared to the A530's, is that they're chunkier and heavier.
Since I am trying to lose weight, I don't mind a little extra weight on my pedals.
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Old 02-07-17, 09:43 AM
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My last couple pedal purchases, I have debated the same, because I'm sure someday I'll finally get into clipless. I keep going back to platform only, don't really want to possibly bother with flipping the pedal the right way everytime I take my foot off. If I ever do get into clipless, I'll reassess my decision at that point.
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Old 02-07-17, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by DarKris View Post
I always hated carrying around a different set of shoes. I would use something that i can clip in to and be able to walk in. I also don't intend on shelling out money right away for cleats.



Since I am trying to lose weight, I don't mind a little extra weight on my pedals.
The cleats come free with the pedals. All you need to buy is a set of shoes which, if you look around, you can find for about what a decent pair of tennis or running shoes will run you. And cycling shoes last a long time.
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Old 02-07-17, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
My last couple pedal purchases, I have debated the same, because I'm sure someday I'll finally get into clipless. I keep going back to platform only, don't really want to possibly bother with flipping the pedal the right way everytime I take my foot off. If I ever do get into clipless, I'll reassess my decision at that point.
I now have two sided clipless, but I used the M324 and similar style pedals for about 10 years. It is really pretty easy to deal with. Once you are clipped in, you are really only talking about re clipping into one side. If you get the flat side as you start riding, you ride the flat side for a rotation or two, then flip the pedal with your toe and clip in. After a ride or two, it becomes almost automatic.
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Old 02-07-17, 11:13 AM
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I've never been a fan of multi-purpose stuff. I don't even use cleaner waxes.

The problem with dual purpose pedals is that you always need to flip them to the right side, and have to remind yourself what you're riding, lest your foot slips off when you don't expect it, or you forget to unclip.

In your shoes, I get a decent set of platform pedals for now, then if and when you decide to do go clipless, you can get another set of pedals cheaply enough. Pedals are easy enough to change, but I suspect that you'll find enough other stuff on the bike that isn't really dual purpose that you'll be scrounging up another bike for CX or road use.
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Old 02-07-17, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
I have both the M324s and the T780s. They're fine but IMO dedicated flats or dual sided SPDs are better in every way.

This comes down to personal preference. I recommend just sticking with platforms. Pinned platforms work just fine for rec to serious rec riding and give you the option of using any shoes you want. IMO they're a better option in lots of situations. I would get the Chesters or something like the VP Vice.

If you've got your heart set on SPDs, I would get the Chesters and a set of M520s or M540s. That would be a great setup for ~$80 and swapping pedals takes no time at all.
Though it isn't hard to swap out pedals, I would not want to be swapping pedals every time I wanted to go out for a ride.
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Old 02-07-17, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
My last couple pedal purchases, I have debated the same, because I'm sure someday I'll finally get into clipless. I keep going back to platform only, don't really want to possibly bother with flipping the pedal the right way everytime I take my foot off. If I ever do get into clipless, I'll reassess my decision at that point.
2X... I still like my flat pedals and am happy with them. I am using mtb ones with the pins built in so its not slippery at all. It's one less thing to think about when you want to ride your bike especially while in college...
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Old 02-07-17, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
The cleats come free with the pedals. All you need to buy is a set of shoes which, if you look around, you can find for about what a decent pair of tennis or running shoes will run you. And cycling shoes last a long time.

Though it isn't hard to swap out pedals, I would not want to be swapping pedals every time I wanted to go out for a ride.
I meant shoes. I use cleats/clipless shoes interchangeably. Force of habit from football/rugby.

I also run pedal spacers, so I would have to change those too....

Originally Posted by RockiesDad View Post
2X... I still like my flat pedals and am happy with them. I am using mtb ones with the pins built in so its not slippery at all. It's one less thing to think about when you want to ride your bike especially while in college...
That's the thing, I have about 3 1/2 more months of college for the most part. I got my bike for commuting around campus and from that I took up longer riding and I was unsure if I should go clipless (or if I could find size 15 shoes that I could still walk around in, but I asked that in a different thread).
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Old 02-07-17, 01:25 PM
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I like versatile stuff - I run Shimano SPD Clipless with an MTB platform cage around them for mostly Clipless riding on my MTB and gravel bike - they're pretty comfortable with regular shoes, although there is a small bump in the middle of the pedal due to the binding.

I also like Zefal half clips with regular shoes - I never slip with those and it increases the power stroke from 180 to 270 degrees, although lacks the last 90 degree pull-up stroke you can get with Clipless/Straps. No risk of getting trapped in them on an unexpected fall/tip-over too. They're only ~8$ on Amazon and install on most any stock pedal.
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