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Want to start riding - having trouble choosing a bike

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Want to start riding - having trouble choosing a bike

Old 02-10-17, 06:18 PM
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RVinTX
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Want to start riding - having trouble choosing a bike

So much has changed since I bought my last bike. About 28 yrs. ago my husband and I walked into a Target bought 2 $50 bikes and they worked fine until we moved into a house that had no indoor place for them. We never even serviced them. Now after returning FOUR bikes to Target and Walmart I am learning it's not so simple anymore. I've been to several bike shops and everyone has alot to say but I can't tell if it's true or they just want to sell a bike.

I'll be riding mostly in my neighborhood on concrete streets and maybe a little on asphalt and or packed dirt paths (once in a blue moon). I'm 52 and haven't ridden, except occasionally, in AGES. I want to ride for exercise and fun.

So the two bikes I've ridden and liked so far are a 2017 Specialized Alibi (Lg) $475 and a 2017 Giant Cypress DX (Md). $415. I rode a Raleigh and a Canondale but they shifted very loudly (banged into place) and that worries me.
Anyone have an opinion or experience to share that might be helpful?

Like, do I really need $400+ worth of bike? Are all bikes from Academy, Target and Walmart junk? I really want to believe otherwise but after returning FOUR........well, you understand. What about buying used? The bike shops give you free or discounted service as long as you own the bike which I wouldn't get if I bought used. However, I've never had to service a bike. Do you really have to do that now? Or is that hype to get me to buy there?

As you can see, I'm really out of my element. I appreciate any help anyone would like to offer.
Thank you, in advance!
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Old 02-10-17, 06:41 PM
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Welcome to the forum.
Let me touch on the noisy/clunky shifting of those bikes. Most likely the power/speed that you were applying at that moment. All bikes are capable of "talking back".
There may be a lot more comfort in finding a person locally that might go along to view a few bikes, and shops with you. A younger family member of a close friend, etc. Don't rule out a good used bike. Your new mentor could be valuable here. Also run it by a shop you have gained a warm comfy feeling about, for an annual service/tune-up.

Best wishes, enjoy this next bike.
P.S. a good one will lead to another, even better.



-Snuts-
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Old 02-10-17, 07:27 PM
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Look online for positive reviews of local bicycle shops, although not dogma, it's a good starting point. Go with the one that listens to you & you have a good feeling about.

There's a large difference between the quality of bicycles at bike shops & department stores. You'll typically get a year free of tune ups at a bike shop as well.

You're on the right path, go a little further. Good luck.
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Old 02-10-17, 08:42 PM
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Why did you return the 4 bikes?

Keep in mind that those assembling bikes for the department stores aren't "bike people", and make mistakes.

Shifting is good if you have hills. If it is all pancake flat, then single speed bikes are good too.

There should be a few "step through" bikes available (low top tube). It is never vital, but some women find them convenient. It looks like Specialized offers the Crossroads and the Alibi in step-through models.

As far as whether you are best off to spend $200 at Wamart, $400 at your Local Bike Store, or somewhere inbetween on Craigslist. It is a tough call. The $400 bikes are still "entry level", but they should be slightly better than the department store bikes.

The one good thing with buying from a real bike store is continuing support. Judging from the "issues" you had, perhaps that is worth a bit.

Lots of good deals on Craigslist, but usually needing tune-ups or other work. A good deal if you have the skills to do the repairs. But, if you take it to a shop, it can quickly eat up all of your savings.
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Old 02-10-17, 08:54 PM
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As you have probably noticed that bikes aren't as cheap or as simple as they were 20 years ago. I would definitely buy a bike from a local bike shop "LBS". They know what they're selling and will service it as well, plus they will take care of any warranty issues that may come up. The Giant Cypress DX is a really good bike for the $400 range, and it sounds like it would suit you just fine. Any good bike shop will let you "rent" the bike for a weekend, and refund the amount if you decide to buy it. Good way to make sure you're comfortable with the bike.

Good luck, and good riding.
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Old 02-10-17, 09:07 PM
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Department store bikes are assembled out of the cheapest parts available by the lowest paid factory workers.
It is possible to be content with a department store bike, if you first make sure its properly assembled and tuned, and then understand and ride within its limitations.
If you're not mechanically inclined/interested you're likely to be better off with a better bike.
As for shifting loudly, well, there is a bit of skill to it. Easing up on the pedals makes the gears go in easily. Front shifting is never as smooth as rear shifting.
Brand isn't particularly important.
The bike industry is very homogenous. Ignoring sales, a set amount of money will buy you bikes of equal quality regardless of the logo on the frame.
Doesn't mean the bikes will be identical though. One might have nicer brakes, another nicer wheels etc etc.
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Old 02-10-17, 09:10 PM
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It's worth a little extra $$ to buy from your local bike shop to get a good fit and tweaked to your comfort.
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Old 02-10-17, 09:28 PM
  #8  
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LBS all the way. I had never ridden 1 mile. Went to a local LBS and told them what I would like to do, i.e. ride for fitness around the neighborhood several days a week. The guy measured my in seam and ordered a fuji absolute 3.0 and the cost between 4 and 5 hundred.

Im guessing I have 15k miles on that bike now, and still riding it.

Once I started using continental tires (LBS recommendation also), no more flats, it's ride, ride, ride, so yeah, I think it is worth it and then some
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Old 02-10-17, 10:05 PM
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Sometimes it is hard to know if you are going to stick with something or not, and so the investment becomes an issue. You might see if your local bike shops sell used bikes. You will pay more for a used bike from a shop than a private seller (just like cars) but the bike will likely have been serviced and checked over for safety. Another plus is that any shop that sells used bikes will probably take your used bike back as a credit against a better bike if you really get into riding and want to upgrade your ride.
My adult son is an avid cyclist but his best friend and new spouse are not bicyclists. But - they liked the idea of riding on the multi-use paths for fun and exercise after listening to my son. They each got used bikes from their local shop - for about the same price they would have paid for a Walmart/Target bike. Each bike was higher quality than the Walmart bikes with better components, although used. They also got support from the shop in setting up their rides to fit them comfortably.
Just something to look into....
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Old 02-10-17, 11:59 PM
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Thank you!!

You all are awesome! Thank you! Never heard of renting a bike. I'll check into that. My returns had to do with brakes that would not stay aligned and gears that wouldn't decide to be in or out. On one bike I literally couldn't figure out which way was up or down on the shifter! I'd go one way thinking I had it figured out...getting tougher each change then suddenly it would get a lot easier but I was still shifting in the same direction. Mechanically, I can't even see how that's possible!
Thank you again!!
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Old 02-11-17, 06:08 AM
  #11  
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I'd get a brand name hybrid with 40~50mm tires, that would be suitable for the style of riding you speak of. Trek, Giant, there are lots of good brands and the base models are cheap.
Are all bikes from Academy, Target and Walmart junk?
No, but they are cheap, like their toasters and kettles. If a cheap toaster dies you toss it in the bin and go without toast for a day or so. If your bike breaks down though ...
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Old 02-11-17, 06:19 AM
  #12  
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I went through this process last Summer after I returned a loaned bike and was left with a mid '80's Rockhopper. I looked myself into frustration with $500 bikes which seemed no better really than the Rockhopper. Then the owner of a local bike store showed me a Kona Sutra which kinda grew on me over several days and something I should consider. It was part road and part mountain bike. A product like this might be something to consider.
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Old 02-11-17, 06:40 AM
  #13  
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My wife and I were in the exact same position as you a year ago. We hadn't seriously ridden since being kids. I told her I was not going to walmart and buy an el-cheapo bike. That being said we went to 3 or 4 LBS shops looking for a cheaper quality bike. Did a little online research etc. We finally settled on Treks, the LBS fitted us to the right size. We have been very happy with them. We added better pedals, racks, and trunks. I just need to learn how to work on adjusting everything better. Also if you plan to transport them with a car get yourself a good quality bike rack.
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Old 02-11-17, 07:02 AM
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Originally Posted by RVinTX View Post
So much has changed since I bought my last bike. About 28 yrs. ago my husband and I walked into a Target bought 2 $50 bikes and they worked fine until we moved into a house that had no indoor place for them. We never even serviced them. Now after returning FOUR bikes to Target and Walmart I am learning it's not so simple anymore. I've been to several bike shops and everyone has alot to say but I can't tell if it's true or they just want to sell a bike.

I'll be riding mostly in my neighborhood on concrete streets and maybe a little on asphalt and or packed dirt paths (once in a blue moon). I'm 52 and haven't ridden, except occasionally, in AGES. I want to ride for exercise and fun.

So the two bikes I've ridden and liked so far are a 2017 Specialized Alibi (Lg) $475 and a 2017 Giant Cypress DX (Md). $415. I rode a Raleigh and a Canondale but they shifted very loudly (banged into place) and that worries me.
Anyone have an opinion or experience to share that might be helpful?

Like, do I really need $400+ worth of bike? Are all bikes from Academy, Target and Walmart junk? I really want to believe otherwise but after returning FOUR........well, you understand. What about buying used? The bike shops give you free or discounted service as long as you own the bike which I wouldn't get if I bought used. However, I've never had to service a bike. Do you really have to do that now? Or is that hype to get me to buy there?

As you can see, I'm really out of my element. I appreciate any help anyone would like to offer.
Thank you, in advance!
It doesn't sound like you will be putting any bicycle you choose under a great amount of stress, so no, you don't need to spend a lot, but it sounds like you are concerned about quality and service and price. You seek "value", i.e. good quality, good price.

Keep shopping around your LBSs until you find something on sale that you like. Maybe you'll find a 4-500 bike for 300. Remember, you'll need to get some proper riding gear too, so put that into your equation as well.

I'd love to tell you you'll need at least a grand to get a decent bike and decent riding gear...but I'll let you find that out for yourself. And I won't mention how after riding a better quaity bike, you'll soon want another, even better one soon.

So really, plan on spending 2 large over the next year or two, and enjoy yourself. You only live once. Make it a healthy once, and bicycles are one of the best ways to enjoy yourself in the "once" you have to live.

And buy some tools too. Tuning up/servicing bicycles is something most bike owners can do, as major breakdowns are rare.
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Old 02-11-17, 10:07 AM
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A good mid-level dealer quality bike will cost between $800-$1200.

You're looking at a lifetime investment. When you take everything into account, its like a few dollars amortized over 30 years.

A bike is the most cost-effective transportation compared to a car. Its well worth the initial up front expense.
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Old 02-11-17, 10:20 AM
  #16  
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What about an Electra Townie? For puttsing around and enjoying the fresh air you probably don't need much else. It would last you a lifetime as well.

Electra Townie (Canadian Pricing)
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Old 02-11-17, 10:45 AM
  #17  
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Yes you do need a $400-$500 retail entry level bike, unless you have the inclination, time and aptitude to direct order from Bikes Direct or similar on-line discounters. For the online bikes you need the skill for final assembly, which is easy, but also to correct the mistakes on the bike, get all the components adjusted right, and perform the initial maintenance that may have been neglected.

The same kinds of skills are needed to make the Target type bikes work adequately but they won't hold up so that's the most unattractive option, though cheapest. If you want a bike for only one summer, to see what it's like and if you want to stick with, and if so buying a better bike next year then it's not an unreasonable option. You're less likely to enjoy it and become a cyclist with those bikes however.

On the other side of it, we normally recommend entry level bikes for new riders, because you don't really know what kind of bike you'll end up with, what kind of riding you'll do, or what's important to you from a bike. So unless your attitude is "go big or go home", and I sense that it's not, then I wouldn't worry about anything more getting than entry level bike that fits and is fit to be ridden.
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Old 02-11-17, 10:57 AM
  #18  
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I think what it boils down to these days is there are several avenues for finding low cost bikes: X-Mart, online retailers, and used. But in order to take full advantage of those savings, you need some bike tools and mechanical skills to get the bike up to snuff. If you have no interest in wrenching your own bikes, I'd say start a relationship with a local bike shop. A good one will set you up right.
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Old 02-11-17, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by RVinTX View Post
My returns had to do with brakes that would not stay aligned and gears that wouldn't decide to be in or out. On one bike I literally couldn't figure out which way was up or down on the shifter! I'd go one way thinking I had it figured out...getting tougher each change then suddenly it would get a lot easier but I was still shifting in the same direction. Mechanically, I can't even see how that's possible!
Thank you again!!
Brakes:
Tightening, or a wheel off center?
Shifting:
Perhaps cables were crossed or looped around each other. So, for example, tightening the rear cable would shift to easier gears, but might pull the front from easy to difficult.
I think it is unfortunate that department stores sell bikes without any continuing support. You can, of course, take department store bikes into a LBS for a tune-up if necessary.

Parts on the department store bikes may be loose enough to defy proper adjustment, but perhaps their design also allows for some extra flex.

Sporting goods stores are somewhat on the line between department stores and bike shops, and may have a small maintenance area depending on the store. REI typically has what appears to be a small, but professional bike shop.

Anyway, there are lots of options out there... hopefully you'll find one that suits you.

Also a lot of bike styles, from the typical "hybid" that are commonly used for town bikes to actual "town bikes" to MTBs to Road bikes, and anything in between.

From your earlier description, a Hybrid would make a good starter bike, but if you really go crazy with riding, there are many other options.
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Old 02-11-17, 01:38 PM
  #20  
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I know I'm just parroting along with everyone else, but in your case, a bike shop will be your best bet.

There's not a whole lot of difference in the top-end bike from Target (Forge Breva), and a base model Giant Cypress, maybe $40; but as you've seen, assembly quality on department store bikes is a roll of the dice. In case you didn't know, bikes are shipped partially assembled, and finished (and should be adjusted) at the store.

The LBS will (should) make sure everything is working right, and that you are on the right size bike, with the seat, stem, bars adjusted to the right fit for you. With a dept. store bike, you're on your own, or you bring it to the LBS for them to sort out, then negating the purchase savings on the less expensive bike.

What is comes down to is that you pay a little extra on the bike for the service and expertise provided by a dedicated bike shop.
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Old 02-11-17, 02:36 PM
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If you haven't ridden in a long time, and are basically starting again at 52, I suggest you start with a bottom of the line bike from someplace like Academy and make sure you like riding and will stick with it before you invest a lot of money. It is not as easy as you remembered, and it would be a shame to spend a lot of money only to find you don't want to do it. Then, if you do like it and stick with it you can upgrade.
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Old 02-11-17, 04:06 PM
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Well, she's already gone through 4 BSO's (Bicycle Shaped Objects) from Walmart/Target, and I don't know how many more lemons i'd go through, before I started looking somewhere else, or gave up all together.
The bike is a big part of cycling, and if you're on a heavy slow clunker, it's not going to be as enjoyable and something light, lively, and easy to operate.

A good bike can also be viewed as something of an investment, capable of providing years (decades) of service. My MTB has endured 25 years of racing, commuting, and kid-hauling without any major issues, and I ride centuries on a bike that's older than I am.
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Old 02-11-17, 05:36 PM
  #23  
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I'm not sure where you are located but REI has a 1-year satisfaction guarantee on all products (including bikes and kayaks). They also have a full service bike shop (with certified technicians) at all locations. I see this as more of a peace of mind than a good review will give. The prices are a bit higher, but the value from the employees and the open return policy are really nice. Only in the US though for the moment. Whatever you choose, just make sure you love it enough to ride it and that it doesn't just fit the budget at a convenient time. RIDE ON!!!
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Old 02-11-17, 11:34 PM
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Obviously they have TOO many unneeded gears they can neither adjust or use properly.
For starters, look for a bike with ONE front chainring. Probably in the cruiser/comfort class. Even better, forget deraillers and get a 3 sp IGH. Don't expect much for less than $600. Giant has several bikes like this.
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Old 02-12-17, 01:15 AM
  #25  
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Well, I bought a bike!! I was almost ready to buy a Giant Cypress DX when I came across a CL post for a Giant Boulder that needed tirea for....get this..... $20!!! How could I not at least look, right? Nice guy just had it for a long time, hadn't ridden it in ages, and just wanted it gone. Bought it for $15 and took it my LBS (yep, I chose one after reading above) and I'm getting new tires and a good tune up. I also opted to replace the lever shifters with trigger shifters. I like them better. All totaled, I'll be at $235 and I'll have it back by Tuesday! I'm so excited! The bike shop said I got a really great deal! Thanks Everyone!!!
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