Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

"Winding Down" after bad encounters

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

"Winding Down" after bad encounters

Old 02-21-17, 07:02 PM
  #1  
Motolegs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Motolegs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Southern Colorado
Posts: 497

Bikes: General 80's MTB "Icebreaker", Motobecane Grand Jubilee (vintage mint), Trek 1.1, 2014 Motobecane Mirage (steel) Trek 3500 MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
"Winding Down" after bad encounters

I suppose it happens to all of us- hating motorists aiming their twisted logic at us in all sorts of forms...

My inquiry to fellow cyclists, for you, how long does it take in general to wind down from such an encounter? Personally it certainly spoils the ride itself (happened today), then I tend to dwell on it- like what could I have done differently- to even a faint paranoia about running into the same clod the next day. It takes a few days to recover so to speak.

Anyone like to share?
Motolegs is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 07:08 PM
  #2  
jon c. 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 3,689
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 960 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
I just shake my head and mutter 'that wasn't necessary' and forget about it promptly. But I don't get a lot of such encounters and they're usually fairly mild.
jon c. is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 07:13 PM
  #3  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 6,170

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 813 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
I just shake my head and mutter 'that wasn't necessary' and forget about it promptly. But I don't get a lot of such encounters and they're usually fairly mild.
This.
bruce19 is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 07:15 PM
  #4  
LiquorLad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 162
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've yet to have an altercation in the 18 years that I've been seriously cycling. I'm a humble wage slave.

However I was angry with a co worker awhile back that lasted a few days, quite unusual for me. I used that rage in the gym & made some good gains. It's quite incredible the strength you have from such adrenaline, it can be quite dangerous with the wrong personality.

Best to let it go. At the end of the day your still alive to ride another day.
LiquorLad is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 07:23 PM
  #5  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,393

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 128 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2848 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by Motolegs View Post
I suppose it happens to all of us- hating motorists aiming their twisted logic at us in all sorts of forms...

My inquiry to fellow cyclists, for you, how long does it take in general to wind down from such an encounter? Personally it certainly spoils the ride itself (happened today), then I tend to dwell on it- like what could I have done differently- to even a faint paranoia about running into the same clod the next day. It takes a few days to recover so to speak.

Anyone like to share?
If the person just yelled something ... it's a big ol' shrug shoulders. People yap. It's what they do. And it's even funnier if they stick their heads out the window and let their gums flap in the breeze like a dog.

A couple weekends ago we were followed by someone who honked and honked and honked and honked all the way through a narrow section of road. I'm guessing we were supposed to pull over and stop and let the person by. We just found it funny and had quite a laugh.


Or was it actually serious ... like when they throw a glass bottle at you, hit you, or door you from behind?
Machka is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 07:50 PM
  #6  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 13,835

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 213 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6247 Post(s)
Liked 232 Times in 158 Posts
I "Breathe" the Jesus Prayer

Jesus Prayer
TimothyH is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 08:09 PM
  #7  
exmechanic89
Senior Member
 
exmechanic89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Richmond VA area
Posts: 2,725

Bikes: '00 Koga Miyata Full Pro Oval Road bike.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I know what you mean, OP. I've had some ugly encounters and it usually takes me a while to put it behind me. I try not to think about it though, and try and focus on other things - not let it ruin my ride. You just have to accept that there are some complete ***holes in the world.

And hey worrying you might end up in front of the same person's car the next day isnt unreasonable, lot's of crazy people out there. Be vigilant!
exmechanic89 is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 08:10 PM
  #8  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,249
Mentioned: 158 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8371 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 30 Posts
About a second to get back to my ride. Someone yelling at me? I usually can't understand a word they're saying.

I might remember and think about close encounters for years or decades, but I'll continue the ride, and deal with other aspects of "life".
CliffordK is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 10:03 PM
  #9  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 8,828

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2680 Post(s)
Liked 70 Times in 59 Posts
I just call on my inner Deebo.

Here comes Deebo



Seriously, I don't get rattled like I did when I was younger. I just shrug it off now.

During Tuesday's ride some car drifted into my lane on a curve, then honked at me for being too close. Whatevs.
canklecat is offline  
Old 02-21-17, 11:46 PM
  #10  
JReade
Senior Member
 
JReade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 1,621
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
About a second to get back to my ride. Someone yelling at me? I usually can't understand a word they're saying.
Seriously. I don't hear that well anyway, and add in any other noise, and I just hear about one word of what they were screaming. I'm sure they got home safe feeling like they "showed me" or something of the sort, but I can't worry about that. Life is far too short to be that angry. I've gotten buzzed and still had good rides. Sure, I've had a few close calls, but I find that bikes are cathartic in that regard.
JReade is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 12:05 AM
  #11  
linberl
Senior Member
 
linberl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,348

Bikes: 2017 Bike Friday PakiT. Dahon Mu Uno (trailer bike) Sold: 2003 Bike Friday NWT, 1997 Trek 720, 1993 Trek 520)

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 908 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I was a retail manager for many years and what worked for me then with awful customers was the same thing that works for me in these situations. I stop and recognize that anyone who acts like an a-hole probably has a pretty lousy life and that's why they behave that way. I repeat my mantra "My life is great and your life sucks" over and over and in a few minutes, I am good again. Feel free to borrow it. It really works.
linberl is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 12:46 AM
  #12  
SquidPuppet
Calamari Marionette Ph.D
 
SquidPuppet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Coeur d' Alene
Posts: 7,965

Bikes: 3 Chinese Gas Pipe Nerdcycles and 2 Chicago Electroforged Boat Anchors

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2345 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Motolegs View Post
I tend to dwell on it-
You have a choice. To dwell on it or to move past it. When you choose to dwell on it you are giving them all the control. Don't allow others to control your emotions.
SquidPuppet is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 01:49 AM
  #13  
coominya
Senior Member
 
coominya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Brisbane Aust
Posts: 1,644

Bikes: Giant ToughRoad Giant talon

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 703 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One smoke, if I've brought any on the ride.
coominya is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 05:35 AM
  #14  
AlmostTrick
Tortoise Wins by a Hare!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Looney Tunes, IL
Posts: 6,462

Bikes: Wabi Special FG, Raleigh Roper, Nashbar AL-1, Miyata One Hundred, '68 Schwinn Orange Krate, and More!!

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1024 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by Motolegs View Post
I suppose it happens to all of us- hating motorists aiming their twisted logic at us in all sorts of forms...

My inquiry to fellow cyclists, for you, how long does it take in general to wind down from such an encounter?
These moments of receiving motorist hate are rare for me, maybe a few times a year? I don't count honks, 'cause they're usually fairly benign.

Usually, it'll immediately piss me off greatly if someone yells at or threatens me, but I'm mostly over it after a few minutes. It may pop up in my thoughts again later, but will not over take them. Like others have said, it's our choice. I choose not to let the terrorists win!
AlmostTrick is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 05:55 AM
  #15  
coffeesnob
Senior Member
 
coffeesnob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Va
Posts: 439

Bikes: Trek DS 8.3 - cannondale M500

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2416 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sometimes bicyclist's need to be honked at or maybe raise a hand to show "what are you doing?" Drive around VCU in Richmond and these kids weave and bob in between traffic, disobey lights, ride as close to you as they can so they don't have to stop. ETc..ETc...ETc.....
coffeesnob is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:13 AM
  #16  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 14,447

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2462 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 22 Posts
It takes 10-15 seconds usually. Don't dwell on it.
wphamilton is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:13 AM
  #17  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,256

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1143 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
You have a choice. To dwell on it or to move past it. When you choose to dwell on it you are giving them all the control. Don't allow others to control your emotions.
That's what I think too.

I have (pretty well) gotten over the urge to "get back at them". Intellectually, I think that the best thing is to do nothing. When you stick up your middle finger, or respond in some similar way, you are telling them that they won. They were successful in upsetting you. If you can bring yourself to smile and simply ride on, they have gone to all that trouble for nothing. They've failed.

I'm a strong believer in the Karma thing too. Those people have to contend with disagreeable people all day, every day because everybody else reflects their negative attitude back at them. What a miserable existence that must be! You and I only have to contend with the occasional (and they are a vast minority) jerk.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:19 AM
  #18  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,688

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2963 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 44 Posts
it helps if you have more riding to do after the encounter

2 miles from my start. had an encounter, one rainy morning, on my way to work, bunch a yrs ago. plummer van buzzed me & cut back in front of me, on a blind curve, in the rain, over a small narrow bridge. he just couldn't wait until the coast was clear. cudda killed me or someone else. lucky there was no child in the rd or car coming in the opposite direction.

caught up to him at the stop sign by the post office. let into him like a windmill in a tornado (verbally)

stopped traffic while I berated him. sh*t-for-brains actually started to grin cuz I was so upset. until I threatened him with reporting his plate to the town police. being an independent contractor, that slapped the smile off his face right quick

sent him on his way with new knowledge about cycling, auto safety & my town

I got so riled up I got "Scissor leg" aka "Elvis Presley Syndrome", or "Disco knee" (technical explanation: build-up of lactic acid in the muscle. Prolonged contraction of the muscle causes lactic acid to build up more quickly than your circulation system can remove it. The lactic acid in the muscle causes involuntary, spastic contractions in the muscle)

pretty upsetting when you see your life is potentially in jeopardy. only other time I had that leg thing happen was rock climbing

glad that the next part of my ride was a steep hill to climb plus another fast 11 miles to the office
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:21 AM
  #19  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,247

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3586 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
I commute about 100 miles every day. While I've had a couple bad experiences on a bike, I've had far more in a car just doing that drive. Yes, people will shout at you in a car out their car window, too.

At this point, PO'd crazy drivers simply don't faze me in any way while I'm operating any vehicle. I've simply come to expect it as a part of a system where anyone with a pulse is allowed to drive.
jefnvk is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:22 AM
  #20  
churnman
Senior Member
 
churnman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 135

Bikes: 1986 Specialized Allez SE "Jim Merz" edition, Trek 750

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Best to let it go. At the end of the day your still alive to ride another day

Something I try to live with, even off the bike.
churnman is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:25 AM
  #21  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,275

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 793 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
Four things help me deal with "winding down" after "rude" or dangerous motorist encounters:

1) Podcasts. I listen to spoken word podcasts while riding. One ear, curbside. My attention is quickly back on the podcast conversation (usually).

2) Improv. I joined an improv comedy/theater troup six years ago. It is like team story-telling, and you don't have control over where the story goes. You may get a brilliant idea or irresistible detail to add to the scene, but if the story zigs, where you thought it would zag, you must clear your head of those notions, re-evaluate the situation and move on. What's more, the famous improv mantra of "yes, and..." means you accept the "current reality" and contribute to it in a positive manner. It's kinda like sports or music. You get certain types of physical or mental habits, and one is "drop it, and move on." This has helped me in all aspects of my life, work, personal and family. So when an inconsiderate, motorist, a self-centered client, a family emergency or life itself throws me an unexpected curve, I am calmer, more positive and better able to move on.

3) Helmet Cam. "Let's go to the tape..." they used to say for sports replays. I have been videotaping my rides for the last few years. I have found that certain close calls aren't so close on review. A few times now I have had beligerant motorists begin yelling and even one exit their vehicle and come towards me. I simply point to my helmet cam and say "You're on video!" So far that has stopped them in their tracks (literally), altough I have seen internet videos where it hasn't. If I feel threatened I have the license plate, make and model of the driver, plus his or her face to offer to the authorities. But I've only done that once, where as three times I have used that info to call the company whose owns a commercial vehicle to compliment the driver on thoughtful or courteous behavior.

4) Age and Experience. This is the toughest strategy to come by. I'm 55 and I'm just generally calmer than I was at 25. My body reacts more slowly, my mind takes more time to process events. Fitting the current "situation" into the big picture takes longer because the "picture" gets bigger every year and there is more context and life experience to filter through. You have been through these situations before and they are less of a big deal. Sure, some older people are still quick to react, but I think most people become more cir***spect the older they get.

4b) Other, bigger problems in life. Here's Woody Allen in the movie "Annie Hall": “I feel that life is divided into the horrible and the miserable. That's the two categories. The horrible are like, I don't know, terminal cases, you know, and blind people, crippled. I don't know how they get through life. It's amazing to me. And the miserable is everyone else. So you should be thankful that you're miserable, because that's very lucky, to be miserable.”

The fact that you've identified a behavior that you want to change, and that you've asked for solutions, shows you posess self awareness and a desire to improve. You'll be fine.

Last edited by BobbyG; 02-22-17 at 08:29 AM.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 08:30 AM
  #22  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,224
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 425 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Luckily, I rarely get yelled or honked at. I try a friendly wave when I does happen. It helps to have "short term memory" when it comes to these encounters. The only time I get more stirred up is when I feel someone deliberately did something dangerous that could have hurt me.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 09:00 AM
  #23  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,631
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 614 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 20 Posts
"Winding Down" after bad encounters
Originally Posted by Motolegs View Post
I suppose it happens to all of us- hating motorists aiming their twisted logic at us in all sorts of forms...

My inquiry to fellow cyclists, for you,how long does it take in general to wind down from such an encounter? Personally it certainly spoils the ride itself (happened today), then I tend to dwell on it- like what could I have done differently- to even a faint paranoia about running into the same clod the next day. It takes a few days to recover so to speak.

Anyone like to share?
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
I have (pretty well) gotten over the urge to "get back at them". Intellectually, I think that the best thing is to do nothing. When you stick up your middle finger, or respond in some similar way, you are telling them that they won. They were successful in upsetting you. If you can bring yourself to smile and simply ride on, they have gone to all that trouble for nothing. They've failed.

I'm a strong believer in the Karma thing too.
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
I "Breathe" the Jesus Prayer

Jesus Prayer
Nearly all my bad encounters that upset me are those passing too close (IMO). Rarely do I get yelled at, and usually can’t hear / understand the message. Here’s how I release steam and calm down quickly:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…How to get the message out? I find threads about what to say to a driver futile, since these are brief, often emotion laden encounters, and often the cyclist makes a bad impression.

I have in the past posted about giving “bicyclist curses,” and “bicyclist blessings”; about five (5) blessings a day, and about three (3) curses a week. See also the sign below, on my commute through Brookline.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have those exact thoughts whenever I am passed, even when not too close by motorist who does not slow down or move over slightly, just as an indication that they notice me. I always think those self-absorbed cagers are only restrained by the thought of scratching their cars, or the hassle of filing police reports.

My only satisfactory retribution is to give them my previously-described Bicyclist Curse. (I repeatedly jab my pointed right index finger in their direction, while shouting an accusatory, ”You, you, you…). The possibility of metaphysical retribution is more satisfying than the middle finger.

I do also bestow Bicyclist Blessings on drivers who show even a modi*** of respect, with a wave of the hand. ….
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_2782.jpg (96.3 KB, 195 views)

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 02-22-17 at 09:05 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 09:17 AM
  #24  
Hypno Toad
meh
 
Hypno Toad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hopkins, MN
Posts: 3,583

Bikes: 17 Breezer Radar Pro; 15 Surly Pugsley; 13 Felt Z85; 11 Globe Daily; 09 Kona Dew Drop; 96 Mondonico

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 625 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
It's a challenge, but I find humor is the best medicine.

I like to laugh and blow kisses - like this week when some knuckle-head leaned out the passenger window to yell something, all I could hear is "... *****... ". I really hoped to catch them at the next light to record a conversation (w/ helmet mounted GoPro), but they made the green and I got the red.

Other days don't go so well, like when I'm stressed out, tired, or have been harassed by multiple drivers. Then I tend to use the one-finger-salute and then fume for a few miles. On days like this, I make a focused effort to get in the present and forget the A-holes and get my mind on the road in front of me.

I have to say, when I was a daily bike-commuter, it was easier to laugh it off because it was just a part of every ride (I'm not kidding). But I moved to a home-office two years ago, now I find myself avoiding rush-hour for my rides; now the morons honking and yelling are more unnerving. But, we must remember: Don't let the bastards get you down!

Here's a nice list of responses that will help you keep your humor and not get unsettled:

Hypno Toad is offline  
Old 02-22-17, 09:21 AM
  #25  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,422

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by linberl View Post
I stop and recognize that anyone who acts like an a-hole probably has a pretty lousy life and that's why they behave that way.
This.
kickstart is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.