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Help me upgrade my bike

Old 02-28-17, 07:40 PM
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Deviation01
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Help me upgrade my bike

Hi there,
Long story short I have an old 2004 Trek 1000 frame that fits me very well. I am trying to upgrade the bike and change it up a bit. Its an 8 speed rear with triple chainring. I would like to go to maybe 9 cogs with double chainring. Currently the bike has Sora components. What will you guys suggest my upgrades should be? I am looking to not spend much but the bike needs some love.

What I dont need:
Seat
Wheel
Tires
Pedals

What I need:
Everything else is fair game.

I am good at wrenching but road bikes is something new to me.
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Old 02-28-17, 07:48 PM
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Welcome aboard.
Gearing is a good place to start. Look at what you currently have, play a bit.

Hope this helps,

-Snuts-
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Old 02-28-17, 08:27 PM
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Go for a 105 50-34x12-28 maybe, or something similar ... probably cost you $300 for everything --shifters, cables, brakes, BB, cranks, chainrings, cassette, chain. That or Tiagra 4700.

Isn't much else but seat post, stem, and bars, really. if the bars are comfortable and the riding position suits you, no reason to change any of that.

You might want to paint the frame if you have it all stripped down anyway.
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Old 02-28-17, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Go for a 105 50-34x12-28 maybe, or something similar ... probably cost you $300 for everything --shifters, cables, brakes, BB, cranks, chainrings, cassette, chain. That or Tiagra 4700.

Isn't much else but seat post, stem, and bars, really. if the bars are comfortable and the riding position suits you, no reason to change any of that.

You might want to paint the frame if you have it all stripped down anyway.
Thank you for the pointers that is what I was looking for!!
I like the Tiagra 4700 but how do I know what length it is. There are two options 170mm and 172.5mm. Also is short cage rear derailleur better?
Size i guess 12.28t?
What about teeth?
50.34 or 52.36
Sorry none of this is familiar.
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Old 02-28-17, 10:16 PM
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First thing is to count the number of teeth on your big chainring---the big gear up front. Probably the number of teeth is stamped on it somewhere in tiny numbers, barely visible. Likely you have something like a 52-42-30 or a 52-39-30 chainset .... that would be the number of teeth ion the chainrings, big to small.

Unless you race, I doubt you would need a 52-tooth big ring. With a 52x11 you would be cruising at 33 mph at 90 rpm. I know I might hit that on a long downhill, but not on a flat. 50x11 gets you 32 mph at 90 rpm .... again, only useful on a downhill.

A 52x12 gets you 30.5 mph on the flat, and 50x12 yields 29.4 mph.

I don't know about you but I know that pretty much no one I know hits that kind of speed except in a very short sprint. most people cruise between 13 and 20 mph---and 20 mph is a good average for a very fast group ride.

Tonight I hit 29 mph on a downhill with a 42x11 gear.

I have a few bikes: 52-39x11-25, 52-42x11-25, 50-34x11-28, 48-38-28x14-34. The only one where I really Use the top gear is the 48x14 on my touring/grocery bike ... and not often. I am swapping to 12-25 and 12-28 with my next paycheck.

If you are six feet tall or above you night want 172.5 mm cranks. I use both 170 and 175 and I am over six feet. Still, longer cranks for longer legs.

Short-cage derailleur should be able to handle 28 teeth. If you go to a 32-tooth granny gear you might need the long cage ... but that is only if you live in the mountains. if you are not sure if you might want the 32-tooth cog eventually, get the long cage---it will work just as well, the only issue is its a tiny bit heavier, which only matters to people who want to race at high levels.

I have Tiagra on two bikes and I love it. I like the brakes better than Ultegra, and it shifts about the same.
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Old 02-28-17, 10:52 PM
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+1 for Shimano 105. For the price you'll never match the quality of the parts or how well they function. 50/34 with 12-28 should cover almost any type of riding you would want to do on a road bike. A longer cage derailleur will give you more options for lower gearing if you need and functions just as well and you'll never notice the extra ounce that it may weight.


Most important have fun, pick out parts that speak to you or match your style. You can never go wrong with King Cage bottle cages either, the stainless steel ones are probably the best $17 bucks you can spend on a bike and they're made in the US too.


Good Luck!
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Old 02-28-17, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Go for a 105 50-34x12-28 maybe, or something similar ... probably cost you $300 for everything --shifters, cables, brakes, BB, cranks, chainrings, cassette, chain. That or Tiagra 4700.
Originally Posted by onomic View Post
+1 for Shimano 105.
If you buy 11s Shimano 105, you'll have to also replace your rear wheel or rear hub.
10s Shimano 105 (or Ultegra) is probably an E-Bay thing.

Assuming an 8s cassette, the wheels should support 8s, 9s, or 10s cassettes.
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Old 03-01-17, 12:20 AM
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4700 Taigra is 10-speed, so you could keep your wheels. I would prefer 105 given the option, but as I said above, i have two bikes with Tiagra and it is fine. I really like it.
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Old 03-01-17, 06:06 AM
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Sell the bike & upgrade by buying a used one with better specs.

I used to have an entry level GT Palomar mtb. I bought it brand new & put 5800km on it over 12 years. It was bulletproof & had a lot of sentimental value. However, I wanted to upgrade. I sold it & bought a GT Avalanche. It has a Marzochi fork, LX/ XT components, Mavic wheelset, & other great parts the previous owner added. I got a killer bike that's 9lbs less than my old one, far better specs, & it only cost me $160 more.

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Old 03-01-17, 06:30 AM
  #10  
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To go from an 8-speed triple to a 9-speed double means new shifters. As a general rule, that's the most costly component on your bicycle, If you are a left brain, logical person, now is the time to think about what you are spending and what you are getting in return.

If you are a right brain, artistic person, you are going to want to go ahead anyway. I understand that because that's me too. You said that you don't want to spend much. The cheapest way to buy bicycle components is bolted onto a frame. In other words, keep your eyes out for a donor bike that has bent wheels but otherwise good components.

Good luck.
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Old 03-01-17, 09:50 AM
  #11  
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That's why I suggest buying a whole groupset at one of the UK retails ,,, Ribble, Wiggle, whatever else, I always forget. he can get a full 4700 Tiagra double groupset (cranks, rings, cluster, brifters, brakes, BB, derailleurs) for $317.25 on Ribble. Can't get a complete bike for that much.

Also, if the frame is already right (fits, functions) the frame will last forever. Where could he get a new frame which would be substantially better? Maybe Chinese CF for $450-$500 but then we are talking $1000 for the build ..... seems to me a $325 groupset is about his best way forward.
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Old 03-01-17, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
That's why I suggest buying a whole groupset at one of the UK retails ,,, Ribble, Wiggle, whatever else, I always forget. he can get a full 4700 Tiagra double groupset (cranks, rings, cluster, brifters, brakes, BB, derailleurs) for $317.25 on Ribble. Can't get a complete bike for that much.

Also, if the frame is already right (fits, functions) the frame will last forever. Where could he get a new frame which would be substantially better? Maybe Chinese CF for $450-$500 but then we are talking $1000 for the build ..... seems to me a $325 groupset is about his best way forward.
I have done some looking around and I agree with this. The frame already fits my size i am 6.3 and sentimental value. The 4700 Tiagra group is around 300ish. That to me seems cheaper than a new bike.
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Old 03-01-17, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Deviation01 View Post
Its an 8 speed rear with triple chainring. I would like to go to maybe 9 cogs with double chainring... I am looking to not spend much...
If you want to go 9-speed on the cheap, you can do it just by changing your cassette and shifters to 9-speed models. Your 8-speed hub will take 9-speed cassettes. Shimano 8-speed and 9-speed derailleurs & shifters use the same cable pull, so you wouldn't need to change your derailleurs. The difference in width between 8-speed and 9-speed chains isn't enough to be a problem with your crankset or derailleur cage width.

Changing from a triple to a double adds expense, though. Add crankset, bottom bracket, and front derailleur to the shopping list. At this point, it makes sense to consider a whole groupset.
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Old 03-03-17, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
If you want to go 9-speed on the cheap, you can do it just by changing your cassette and shifters to 9-speed models. Your 8-speed hub will take 9-speed cassettes. Shimano 8-speed and 9-speed derailleurs & shifters use the same cable pull, so you wouldn't need to change your derailleurs. The difference in width between 8-speed and 9-speed chains isn't enough to be a problem with your crankset or derailleur cage width.

Changing from a triple to a double adds expense, though. Add crankset, bottom bracket, and front derailleur to the shopping list. At this point, it makes sense to consider a whole groupset.
Thank you all for the great suggestions. I believe I will go with a group set like 4700 Tiagra. I just got to make sure I get the right measurements for my 6.3 frame.
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Old 03-03-17, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Deviation01 View Post
I have done some looking around and I agree with this. The frame already fits my size i am 6.3 and sentimental value. The 4700 Tiagra group is around 300ish. That to me seems cheaper than a new bike.
I would just ask whether 2 x 9, or even 2 x 10 is all that much better than 3 x 8. I know triples are out of fashion and if my triple were to suddenly give up the ghost, I suppose I would need to decide what to do. That said, I see nothing wrong with older triple drivetrains.

If it were me, I might just leave it alone, or if money were really burning a hole in my pocket, maybe upgrade wheels and tires rather than make a sideways move replacing the entire drivetrain.
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Old 03-03-17, 03:56 PM
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POrice Upgrade parts total & Labor, vs just replacing the bike..
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Old 03-03-17, 04:47 PM
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Triples are fine if you use them ... I just went from a triple to a double on one bike because I so rarely used the little ring here in Flatlandia. Generally I prefer having a triple .. . but I like as many cogs as possible so I don't have to shift so often looking for that right ratio.

A 50-36/11-28 (or 12-28) covers about everything except true alpine roadways, and for a rider not hauling any extraneous gear (not commuting, doing laundry, or grocery shopping) a 2x10 might be less work than a 3x8.

Plus, it is fun shopping, buying, and installing new parts. Since labor is not free but is actually a bonus, the $325 for parts is actually vastly reduced. And anyway ... what kind of bike could anyone get for $325? Oh ... an old Trek.
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Old 03-03-17, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I would just ask whether 2 x 9, or even 2 x 10 is all that much better than 3 x 8. I know triples are out of fashion...
Fashion ain't gonna get me up a hill, and we've got lots of 'em around here.

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Triples are fine if you use them ... I just went from a triple to a double on one bike because I so rarely used the little ring here in Flatlandia...
And I went the other way, converting a double to a triple. There are lots of routes around here I just can't do on a standard double.

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
And anyway ... what kind of bike could anyone get for $325? Oh ... an old Trek.
The bike I converted to a triple was an '86 Trek 300 Elance I picked up for $60. The triple drivetrain came from a 2000 Trek 1000 I bought for $90. Two old Treks for $150. ;-)
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Old 03-03-17, 09:57 PM
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Well ... it seems this guy doesn't want to buy someone else;'s worn-out drivetrain. I don't blamer him. Every time I put used parts on a bike, I wonder where then next set will come from----triple cranks particularly. No more triple Ultegra, no more triple 105 ... i believe a triple Tiagra is the best one can do nowadays, and how much longer will that last?

I had old (circa 1988) Deore triples on my tourer, wore out two sets ... now I have Alivio or some such ... but when it comes to matching derailleurs, brifters, and chain rings across MTB/road groups things get sketchy.

As for road bikes, I have to hope triples don't disappear altogether, because while I don't have any major hills close to home, I might not always want to have to ride close to home.

As fro the OP, I have to imagine he has a clue what he is doing ... i don't see someone putting this much thought into building a bike he knows he won't be able to ride.

By the way ... you and I both know that it is either tremendous luck or Many, Many hours searching Craigslist to come up with worthwhile bikes for those prices. I stop at every yard sale I pass ... i check CL .... I look in the windows of thrift stores ... and in the past thirty years I have bought maybe five bikes for under $100 that had parts that were actually worth building with ... and prices get higher with each passing year.

When my 1984 Raleigh crankset wears out, I don't think I am going to find a replacement really easily, eh?

What's your plan when the Trek triple goes?
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Old 03-05-17, 07:21 PM
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Hey guys thank you for all the input. When it comes to wheels i sourced out an old fulcrum 6 wheels and have brand new tires on them.
The sora components that the bike comes with seem a bit aged. The shifters especially. I am anal about having a full group set and not a Frankenstein. Also I dont have a lot or hills on my ride so a double would work. All the advices so far has been great.

One major question is when looking at forks how do i know what fits my bike?
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Old 03-05-17, 07:59 PM
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You have to know the diameter of the seat tube to fit the new derailleur. Might be able to look it up online, or the old derailleur might be marked. Trek will know, so email them if all else fails.
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Old 03-05-17, 08:02 PM
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A fork is more complicated. You need to know about things like rake/trail and how that changes handling, steerer diameter and length, threaded/threadless, brake reach, tire clearance. It's not just plug and play.
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Old 03-05-17, 09:08 PM
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Wow ... I missed "fork" in that question .... definitely past my bedtime.

Contact trek and get the dimensions, or browse online for old Trek catalogs.

I wouldn't worry Too much about rake and such, because most generic replacements forks are designed to work pretty well with most massed-produced frames, and unless you are riding something exotic .... half a degree here or ten millimeters there you probably wouldn't notice.

Headset dimensions are really important ... again Trek or Trek catalogs. I'd assume since it is an old bike it has a standard one-size headset.

Something like this (http://vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fisher-...manualTrek.pdf) might help.
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Old 03-06-17, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Wow ... I missed "fork" in that question .... definitely past my bedtime.

Contact trek and get the dimensions, or browse online for old Trek catalogs.

I wouldn't worry Too much about rake and such, because most generic replacements forks are designed to work pretty well with most massed-produced frames, and unless you are riding something exotic .... half a degree here or ten millimeters there you probably wouldn't notice.

Headset dimensions are really important ... again Trek or Trek catalogs. I'd assume since it is an old bike it has a standard one-size headset.

Something like this (http://vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fisher-...manualTrek.pdf) might help.
It is a 2002 trek 1000. That link will help! Going of your front derailleur comment would the 4700 fit the frame?
It says that in the catalog "Down pull, 34.9 mm/ 1 3/8”, high clamp only attachment"
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Old 03-06-17, 10:54 AM
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I saw the 2002 Trek catalog here: http://www.vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fis...manualTrek.pdf Your 1000 is on pages 91 and 92. Some of the details to consider:

- Can rear hub take 10 speed cassette? (8 spd probably can).
- Short reach or long reach brakes? (probably short but might need to measure it).
- Braze-on or clamp on front derailleur? (looks like 34.9mm clamp on).
- Short cage rear derailleur should be ok with 11-28 or 12-28 cassette.
- Chain length will be different. See http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain
- Compact or standard crankset? Probably compact if you want the lower range.
- Select a crank arm length. Usually 172.5mm or could take the size specced in the fit table in the doc above (if available).
- Also buy a brake and derailleur cable kit. Might as well get new cables since you're stripping it down.

Last edited by ptempel; 03-06-17 at 11:55 AM.
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