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-   -   Century on a Hybrid? (https://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/1099498-century-hybrid.html)

CatchMeRidin 03-02-17 06:01 PM

Century on a Hybrid?
 
I just got a 2017 Trek FX 2. I have really enjoyed riding it and I am thinkin about doing a century ride in August. Would it be possible to do it on this bike?

jon c. 03-02-17 06:05 PM

If you're fit enough to do it and the bike fits you well, sure.

wolfchild 03-02-17 06:08 PM

Century rides can be done on any type of a bike. I've done them on my fixed gear and I also done it on a MTB. As long as the bike fits you well, go for it and enjoy the ride.

CatchMeRidin 03-02-17 06:22 PM

Okay great! I plan to do the HOTTER'N HELL HUNDRED in Texas. I am pretty athletic and in good shape but a ROOKIE to this world. Any tips for my first century ride? Any good training plans you recommend?

Garfield Cat 03-02-17 06:30 PM

Metric Conversion

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DMC707 03-02-17 06:39 PM

Centuries on hybrids have been done before ---- The HHH is in late August, who knows, by that time, you may love this sport so much you might have a zippy road bike by then, but if not, the Hybrid will do fine

difference between 100 miles and 100 kilometers is 38 miles (100k is 62 miles ).

You can use the HHH 100 miler as a peak of the year, but I would recommend having a couple of the 100k's under your belt and another ride of up to 85 miles or so prior to the event.
On a hybrid you wont be going quite as fast as the folks on dedicated road bikes , so you may be out there a little longer, so make sure your properly acclimatized to the heat , -- that ride can also get quite windy --- if it takes you 7 hours, you'll be out there pedaling the last few miles in the 2-3pm time frame ----

You'll have plenty of company , and there are plenty of stops and aid stations along the way --- tons of places to take a breather, down some oranges or refill your water bottles

Again, having a couple of rides under your belt that are approaching peak distance is crucial to ensure you have the best time, --- ive heard people say, - "Well, that 50 miler was easy, - I'm ready to try a century" --- Saddles and shorts that are comfortable for 2 or 3 hours can become torture devices after 4 or 5 hours , let alone 6 or 7, --- so a few big rides will help you weed out any questionable equipment , as well as figure out your hydration schedule and requirements.

As mentioned, the HHH has plenty of stops, but I still recommend everyone have enough to take care of themselves if they feel a bonk coming on out at mile 85 or something --- because after 85 miles, its true that your almost there, --- but its also true that your 15 miles out, and that's another hour more or less, on a hybrid at least

Have fun, - train hard - you have plenty of time :)

wipekitty 03-02-17 10:22 PM


Originally Posted by wolfchild (Post 19414652)
Century rides can be done on any type of a bike. I've done them on my fixed gear and I also done it on a MTB. As long as the bike fits you well, go for it and enjoy the ride.

+1. Century rides can be a good time on any bike.

Gaelen 03-02-17 11:04 PM

I'll see you out there, maybe, LOTS of people come out for that.
I saw several hybrids last year, so, yeah, definitely possible. There's a stop at least every ten miles, more frequent towards the end. August is also a ways away, so, you should have plenty of time to get in shape. Best of luck and hope you decide to do the ride!

churnman 03-03-17 06:45 AM

The type of tires on your hybrid will mean a lot when attempting a century. Smoother tires with low rolling resistance inflated to a high level will make the ride on your bike more like a road bike. I have seen people show up for a century with knobby mud-skipper tires and these will definitely make the ride more difficult and less enjoyable.

CatchMeRidin 03-03-17 06:52 AM

Okay great I'm excited about it. Most of the training plans are 12 weeks I've notice. I will start well before then but get on a stricter schedule 12 weeks out. The one I have seemed to like the most trains 5 days a week and does have some long rides working up to 100 every week. I plan to do a 90-100 in training at least once and then taper down...but what does tapering look like? What should my last long ride be the week before the race? I don't want to over do it. Also, should I completely rest on my two days off or should I mix in strength training on one of those days?

CatchMeRidin 03-03-17 06:55 AM


Originally Posted by churnman (Post 19415434)
The type of tires on your hybrid will mean a lot when attempting a century. Smoother tires with low rolling resistance inflated to a high level will make the ride on your bike more like a road bike. I have seen people show up for a century with knobby mud-skipper tires and these will definitely make the ride more difficult and less enjoyable.

Okay that's good to know. The guys I got my bike from are pretty great. The adjustments are free for lifetime so I will take advantage of that and I will check and see if I'll need new tires around race time.

_ForceD_ 03-03-17 07:14 AM

It's not a race (and even if it was)...ride whatever 'floats your boat.' In the Hilly Hundred (granted is a century over two days)...I've seen beach cruisers, kids on banana seat stringrays, and one year a guy on a road-bike-sized scooter.

Dan

MRT2 03-03-17 08:52 AM


Originally Posted by CatchMeRidin (Post 19414640)
I just got a 2017 Trek FX 2. I have really enjoyed riding it and I am thinkin about doing a century ride in August. Would it be possible to do it on this bike?

How far and how fast can you go now?

exmechanic89 03-03-17 08:56 AM


Originally Posted by wolfchild (Post 19414652)
Century rides can be done on any type of a bike. I've done them on my fixed gear and I also done it on a MTB. As long as the bike fits you well, go for it and enjoy the ride.

^Exactly.

CatchMeRidin 03-03-17 09:17 AM


Originally Posted by MRT2 (Post 19415661)
How far and how fast can you go now?


I haven't gotten a chance to see how far I can go because I'm mostly getting up and riding before work but I usually get 6-8 miles in very easily. I was going to test my endurance this weekend. I've been riding through a neighborhood to get to a trail so I have to weave around a lot of obstacles some I'm not really sure on speed, but according to an app around 13 miles per hour. I'm also trying to get comfortable with using my gears.

ptempel 03-03-17 09:23 AM

The Trek FX 2 looks like a good bike. It takes 32c tires, so they should be fairly comfy as long as you don't over inflate them. I would focus on:

Bike fit. Is you saddle comfortable? Is it at the right height? Fore and Aft position good? Stem length feel comfortable? Handlebar height? Your bike shop can help with this.

Cycling shorts. Would recommend at least one cycling shot with a chamois. Some folks also use chamois cream for longer rides.

Pedals (optional). Your Trek FX 2 doesn't look like it comes with clipless pedals. Ask your bike shop about them. Maybe they have something with an SPD clip on one side and a flat one on the other for regular shoes. If you consider clipless, then also ask about shoes. I used to have some old touring shoes with a flat thin sole (Detto Pietro). They had a firm sole that worked well with toe clips and straps. So that's another option if your pedals will accept them.

Training. Just get out on the bike and have fun. If you can use it for commuting, then that would be great as well. Break in the shorts. Try them with longer rides. Try to feel comfortable riding 3/4 of the distance. So try building up to 60 to 75 miles for a 100 mile event.

Food. Try bringing some along with you on the longer rides (2 hrs or more). Experiment with dates, fig newtons, rice cakes, salted nuts or trail mix, etc. Search here on the forums for others that ride and race longer distance. Just make sure that you won't get any stomach problems with what you eat and drink. Ask if you could leave a small bag of food and water bottle at one of the supported stops in the middle. It might allow you to not have to worry about carring it up to that point.

Pace yourself. If you feel good riding in a specific gear, then try shifting down one and spin a little more. If others are not going your speed, then don't worry about them. I have found it difficult to hold back and not get burnt out too early in the past. This one gear less was what I used so far and seems to "keep me in check."

stoplight 03-03-17 09:30 AM


Originally Posted by CatchMeRidin (Post 19414640)
I just got a 2017 Trek FX 2. I have really enjoyed riding it and I am thinkin about doing a century ride in August. Would it be possible to do it on this bike?

completed two centuries on a Giant FCR 1, A Fred will have no problem banging it out. :)

rumrunn6 03-03-17 09:53 AM

an all day ride, during the hottest month, in the hottest state? wutz the weather down there now? just try it now & see how you do. start early & start at a comfortable pace. don't experiment w foods, stick with stuff you know your tummy likes. you'll be drinking all day so consider mineral & electrolyte supplements. Gatorade gives me a sour stomach so I stay away from sports drinks like that

MRT2 03-03-17 02:49 PM


Originally Posted by CatchMeRidin (Post 19415735)
I haven't gotten a chance to see how far I can go because I'm mostly getting up and riding before work but I usually get 6-8 miles in very easily. I was going to test my endurance this weekend. I've been riding through a neighborhood to get to a trail so I have to weave around a lot of obstacles some I'm not really sure on speed, but according to an app around 13 miles per hour. I'm also trying to get comfortable with using my gears.

100 miles in August heat is an ambitious goal. It isn't so much about the hybrid as it is about you. Right now you are riding 30 or 40 minutes in, presumably, cool weather. At your current pace,that means riding 7 to 9 hours in, maybe, 90 degree plus heat. And, I guarantee you won't be going as fast in hour 6 or hour 7 as you do in the first hour of riding. That said, you have quite a few months to train and acclimate to the heat, and to get faster.

Milton Keynes 03-03-17 03:12 PM

I plan on doing my first century this year on my hybrid. I've already done a couple of half centuries on it so I don't think the bike being a hybrid will be that big of a deal.

ClydeTim 03-03-17 03:19 PM

Any bike! I've done a 120 miler on a hybrid, a 60 miler on a fat tire knobby mountain bike.

Just make sure to ride as many miles as you can between now and then. Being in good shape does not mean you can just hop on the bike and do 100. It takes time for the muscles to adapt to the movement. Much like being in excellent shape but if you aren't used to leaning over the motor, changing the spark plugs in the engine can make your back stiff. :D

fietsbob 03-03-17 03:51 PM

Make a start early so you get 60+ miles in by lunch.

bgraham111 03-03-17 05:12 PM

Head on over to:
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling - Bike Forums
and check out the sticky at the top for century tips. Also, there is a sticky showing people's century bikes. You'll see people use all sorts of bikes. You'll probably pick up some cool tips, and hopefully realize that 100 miles is a gateway drug.

Gaelen 03-03-17 06:27 PM

^ This. Heat will be a big factor, also. It was mild last year at 95ish°.

kbarj 03-03-17 07:12 PM

I think it's all about the motor.

My bride and I just did a 50 miler on Trek DS 8.3s. Our 8 year old (turned 9 the following week) also finished on a MTB. It can be done. We're also targeting the HHH, but probably won't do the century. I may do the metric century as that would be a "Ride My Age" thing for me.


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