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Advice for Cycling with Kids

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Advice for Cycling with Kids

Old 05-06-17, 12:23 AM
  #1  
Nature666
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Advice for Cycling with Kids

I’m thinking to have a three-days cycling trip with my daughter and husband this summer holiday. I googled “ride with kids” on line, there are a lot of guidance, I make a simple list, do you have anything to add? Pls let me know if I missed something, I’m a mom and try to prepare everything perfectly as I can, while I am newbie for this kind of trip, don’t want to be crazy during the family time, any advice would be appreciated.

1. A nice guy in this forum told me “Finding a fun, safe route is the challenge”.
2. Plenty of drinks, Snacks
3. Helmet, sunglasses, Gloves.
4. Bike Trailer or Trailer Bike, should I prepare both? If you bought them before, pls send over the link, thanks.
5. Rechargeable Bike headlight https://amzn.to/2p8eikd (I don’t want to spend too much on those small things, so this DuaFire $19 lamp acceptable?), Battery charger,
6. Toolkit, medical supplies
7. Mobile phone, cash, lock, Toiletries.
8. Distractions. For the children – e.g. tennis ball, Frisbee, action figure.
And, finally, don't forget patience and a sense of humour - remember it won't be long before they'll be waiting for YOU to catch up with THEM!
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Old 05-06-17, 04:38 AM
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In the safety department:

Ride behind them.

That way you can see them at all times and look forward instead of having to turn your head all the time.

If they fall, zig zag, take a wrong turn, have any kind of problem, you'll know right away.
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Old 05-06-17, 06:17 AM
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the light you listed is only 300 lumen, not very bright. Maybe this one might give more light and for longer too... https://www.amazon.com/DuaFire-Ultra...0Z0GV06TDVV4T2

How old the child is and their road riding experience can make all the difference in the world. I think it might be safer to do a day trip trial run and learn from it.

Either way, good luck and have fun.
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Old 05-06-17, 06:26 AM
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Ive done some overnights with my kids and have found that expectations on the adult's side should be lowered. Significantly lowered. Like non-existent.

Sayong 'we need to go' 'we ned to hurry' 'come on catch up' over and again to meet preset or preconceived deadlines is a pretty rough way for the kid(s) to spend their day.

I have planned routes which pass by playgrounds to allow for an off the bike break each hour or so. This resets everyone pretty well.

Also, ive found that 4 hours of on the saddle ride tine is about the max before it turns into me pushing for more out of them.
4 hour of saddle time can equal 6 or so hours in total when you add in lunch and rest stops.
So basically, however far they can go in 4 hours of riding speed, i plan to stop.

This is based on when my kids were between 4 and 8 years old.
This summer, i look forward to a couple of longer trips since my oldest is 10.

Depending on how the child is motivated, you can point out how few other kids do what they are doing. That sense of pride works for one of mine really well, but the other couldnt care less about the uniquness. She is motivated by the immediate, so we discuss how far until the next stop or sight or whatever is next.

Just mention that since positive motivation is a huge help.
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Old 05-06-17, 06:26 AM
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How old is your daughter? How much do all of you currently ride bicycles? Where do you live or plan to ride? These all make a huge difference in what would be recommended.
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Old 05-06-17, 06:45 AM
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How old is your kid? One? Also, where are you? Someone may have local suggestions.

As NYMXer suggested, age will make all the difference. < 4, and the kid may be in a trailer, WeeHoo, or cargo bike. 5-6, maybe some kind of tow-behind (or tandem). > 7.. their own bike, or what seems right.

One of the big questions might be daily distance. And, practising for day-trips will help with that. And it will change rapidly as the kids age. What kind of bikes do the kids and parents have?

Camping vs motels? Then you have to decide how to carry gear for the family.

Historical markers and history can be fun. Maybe a canal tow path and a few museums?
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Old 05-06-17, 12:44 PM
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Start them young and they might even still tour with you when you are old

Warning: Bike touring is addictive!
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Old 05-07-17, 06:56 AM
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I take it that your daughter and her husband have children? The kid's ages are important. My GF has a 3 year old and a 6 year old. The 3 year old rides in a cart and the 6 year old on his own bike.

Anything over a few miles for the 6 year old is asking for trouble.

He has the attention span of a gnat.
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Old 05-07-17, 07:28 AM
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Last month I took my two grand-kids (10 & 13) on a bike ride. The 10 year old can speedskate almost as fast as me, the 13 year old can go real fast. But it took an hour to ride 8 miles. They had to stop and explore every point of interest.
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Old 05-07-17, 01:03 PM
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This is a very common setup in Europe. The kid's bike can be attached to an adults bike when needed, and when it is safe for the youngster to ride they can disconnect the kid's bike. This works well.
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Old 05-07-17, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Nature666 View Post
I’m thinking to have a three-days cycling trip with my daughter and husband this summer holiday. I googled “ride with kids” on line, there are a lot of guidance, I make a simple list, do you have anything to add? Pls let me know if I missed something, I’m a mom and try to prepare everything perfectly as I can, while I am newbie for this kind of trip, don’t want to be crazy during the family time, any advice would be appreciated.

1. A nice guy in this forum told me “Finding a fun, safe route is the challenge”.
2. Plenty of drinks, Snacks
3. Helmet, sunglasses, Gloves.
4. Bike Trailer or Trailer Bike, should I prepare both? If you bought them before, pls send over the link, thanks.
5. Rechargeable Bike headlight https://amzn.to/2p8eikd (I don’t want to spend too much on those small things, so this DuaFire $19 lamp acceptable?), Battery charger,
6. Toolkit, medical supplies
7. Mobile phone, cash, lock, Toiletries.
8. Distractions. For the children – e.g. tennis ball, Frisbee, action figure.
And, finally, don't forget patience and a sense of humour - remember it won't be long before they'll be waiting for YOU to catch up with THEM!
You don't indicate how old your daughter is or how actively you, your husband and daughter have cycled.
We cycled with our guys from around the time they were 4-5 yo. Starting with a tag along, then transitioning to solo riding. By age 8-10 they could and did comfortably ride 50-80 km per day. Our yonngest son, recently 18, rides his bike on campus. A year ago, he earned a pilot certificate, we wish he would get his driver's license so he could ride the 8 km to airport- until then he rides his bike.
While cycling with our guys, we did learn a few things.
First- the ride is your kid's ride. No matter what you plan, you go at your child's pace and interests.
Have to hydrate very often, make sure they drink and fueled well. We almost always stopped around 10 am for chocolate milk and potato chips.
Approx once per hour, get off your bikes - walk for 5-10 min, but try not to actually stop to rest.
There are a number of group rides, often these are a good way to start trips.
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Old 05-07-17, 02:37 PM
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My buddy Henry and his family in NL:

Bakfiets en Meer » Blog Archive » Bikes on Dikes
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Old 05-07-17, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
This is a very common setup in Europe.
Not really. Actually, there is nothing at all about that photo that is common in Europe, and Germany in particular. Helmets, lycra and gloves are seen only on people who race (or some tourists) and backpacks like those pretty much only on tourists. You do occasionally see some hybrid bikes but the majority are upright IGH and recent sales data show hybrid sales declining.

This looks more like some Americans in Germany.
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Old 05-07-17, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Ive done some overnights with my kids and have found that expectations on the adult's side should be lowered. Significantly lowered. Like non-existent.
I agree with this. Cycling is way too competitive,emotional and hardcore for kids. Let them be kids. Ive read threads in here about people wanting to know what age to start their kids "cycling"?? Please....do them a favor buy them a captain America bike and skip the in the zone holding the line stuff until they decide if they want that enjoyment in life...
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Old 05-07-17, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by EnjoyinTheRide View Post
I agree with this. Cycling is way too competitive,emotional and hardcore for kids. Let them be kids. Ive read threads in here about people wanting to know what age to start their kids "cycling"?? Please....do them a favor buy them a captain America bike and skip the in the zone holding the line stuff until they decide if they want that enjoyment in life...
The quote you pulled from my earlier post was just to describe how i have found our setup to work best with me and my kids. Having few expectations, and instead being flexible, is what has worked for us. Having goals but not time/speed expectations.

With that said, i dont find my kids feel any pressure when riding and it doesnt appear to be an emotional burden for them. We challenge them thru encouragement and pushing them to not give up, but that is neither competitive or emotionally burdensome for them.

This thread is about multi-day family rides with a young child. Suggesting a cap merica bike doesnt seem beneficial. My oldest likes her 2x8 kids hybrid. She is more successful on it which brings her enjoyment. The thread isnt about competitive cycling.

Anyways, multi-day cycling rides for a kid doesnt need to be emotional and competitive. It can be an exciting adventure filled with exploration of even basic streams and woods.
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Old 05-07-17, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by CrankyOne View Post
Not really. Actually, there is nothing at all about that photo that is common in Europe, and Germany in particular. Helmets, lycra and gloves are seen only on people who race (or some tourists) and backpacks like those pretty much only on tourists. You do occasionally see some hybrid bikes but the majority are upright IGH and recent sales data show hybrid sales declining.

This looks more like some Americans in Germany.
Are you suggesting that the typical bike tourer in Europe uses an upright IGH bike and no helmet?
I look at the 5-6 major euro online bike retailers and the touring bikes and gear they sell doesnt match your narrative.
The CGOAB stories ive read of touring in Europe have all been on derailleur bikes of some sort- drop bar, trekking bar, or flat bar. But they are all road/touring/mtb setups.
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Old 05-08-17, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Are you suggesting that the typical bike tourer in Europe uses an upright IGH bike and no helmet?
I look at the 5-6 major euro online bike retailers and the touring bikes and gear they sell doesnt match your narrative.
The CGOAB stories ive read of touring in Europe have all been on derailleur bikes of some sort- drop bar, trekking bar, or flat bar. But they are all road/touring/mtb setups.
It depends on the country you are in but generally, yes, most people will be on upright IGH bikes, particularly in northern Europe (SE, NO, FI, NL, DK, and northern DE). Aside from racers, people in lycra and helmets will largely be Americans (with a few Oz & Brits thrown in) and occasional Europeans. Bikes vary and you will see Europeans on hybrids like those in the photo but upright IGH still reigns. My guess is that the touring places you reference are those marketing to the English speaking world and so stock the bikes that their customer base thinks are best.
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Old 05-08-17, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by EnjoyinTheRide View Post
I agree with this. Cycling is way too competitive,emotional and hardcore for kids. Let them be kids. Ive read threads in here about people wanting to know what age to start their kids "cycling"?? Please....do them a favor buy them a captain America bike and skip the in the zone holding the line stuff until they decide if they want that enjoyment in life...
Kids are different. Even twins. My kids both ride every day. Even though it's a distant second to his beloved soccer, my son races and is looking forward to Nevada City. My daughter is transportational. She rides to school and soccer or cheer practice everyday, but has no use for racing or, as she says "Riding around in circles with no where to go."

But no matter what, we try to make it fun and safe.
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Old 05-08-17, 11:25 AM
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Patience!!!!!!!

I know someone whom had very little patience for her daughter going so slow. Be patient with your children when riding. They will love you for it and it is great bonding time. I absolutely love it when my 11 year old daughter bikes with me! She just talks up a storm about everything with me.
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Old 05-08-17, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
Patience!!!!!!!

I know someone whom had very little patience for her daughter going so slow. Be patient with your children when riding. They will love you for it and it is great bonding time. I absolutely love it when my 11 year old daughter bikes with me! She just talks up a storm about everything with me.
Truth
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Old 05-08-17, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Are you suggesting that the typical bike tourer in Europe uses an upright IGH bike and no helmet?
I don't know about Europe as a whole, but in 9 days in Netherlands and Belgium, the overwhelming majority of tourers were on upright city-style bikes, quite a few with e-assist. IGH was more hit or miss, but certainly not uncommon. Helmets were pretty much non-existent on everyone except the folks out in full kit on go-fast CF bikes, and young children.

In fact, other than my Miyata (debatable enough if it is a tourer), the only other "touring" bike I saw the entire time was a Disc Trucker at a hostel in Rotterdam. There were a few MTB/ATB/hybrids, and one group of Italians bike packing on what were pretty close to full on go fast carbon bikes, but nothing really else we'd consider "touring bikes".
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Old 05-08-17, 11:46 AM
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Mmmm, yes, Europe. (nods sagely)

I think front seats only work really great with a long step-through frame and swept handlebars. They might be ok with a US-standard mountain bike if you are ok with cowboy starts and it doesn't run into your chest. If you want a front seat, go for a Yepp or Bobike, probably. I didn't try a Weeride because it would obviously require cowboy starts and didn't get to try an iBert. I had a Thule and it was, IMO, defective in design even though other people give it glowing reviews.

Trailers work great and have minimal impact on how your bike handles, they are just so much work.

I found a back seat to be much easier to deal with as soon as he was big enough. I like the Blackburn Copilot brand, they come with a standard type rear rack and unlatch easily so you can use it for panniers or whatever. The previous color has been on blowout clearance for a while so if you can still find it, I say go for it.
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Old 05-08-17, 12:10 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by CrankyOne View Post
Not really. Actually, there is nothing at all about that photo that is common in Europe, and Germany in particular. Helmets, lycra and gloves are seen only on people who race (or some tourists) and backpacks like those pretty much only on tourists. You do occasionally see some hybrid bikes but the majority are upright IGH and recent sales data show hybrid sales declining.

This looks more like some Americans in Germany.
You are probably correct, common was not the right word; "saw this setup frequently", would have been a more accurate way to say it.

I spent 5 months in Europe, riding over 5,000 miles through 10 countries, and saw this setup quite a bit along established bike routes mostly in France, Germany, Switzerland, The Netherlands , and Belgium. We found it pretty common for families cycling together, especially with small children, to wear helmets. I think the thought is to lead by example. The picture was actually a Swiss Family.

Because I have an interest in families cycling together, and have dozen of photographs of families on touring on bikes. In almost all cases at least the children were wearing helmets.

I'm talking about people on bikes who are touring with children; not old farts riding their bike to the market.

A German family, near Basel

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Old 05-08-17, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
In almost all cases at least the children were wearing helmets.
France and Austria require helmets for younger than 12. I don't think any other European countries have any helmet laws. Helmets became somewhat popular in some countries about 5 or so years ago but seem to have dropped off. For a while about 1 in 5 Swedes wore helmets but that has dropped quite a bit. Swiss might be similar and these part of that 20%.
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Old 05-08-17, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
Spain requires children under 16 years old to wear helmets, but it is not enforced.
Spain actually makes everyone outside an urban area wear a helmet, unless it is too hot, you are a professional, or you are going uphill. Again, though, not enforced. I rented a bike a few years back from a hotel in the mountains, no helmet was even optioned to me.

Do you need to wear a helmet in Spain? - Bike Ramble
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