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Endurance vs normal roadbike w/new stem?

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Endurance vs normal roadbike w/new stem?

Old 05-18-17, 09:32 AM
  #1  
dynawolf
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Endurance vs normal roadbike w/new stem?

I am a new user. I'm on an '02 Trek 5500 which I have had for many years. I am having lower back pain as I am getting older and the LBS suggests an endurance bike. What is "relaxed" geometry? Why not just put a different stem on the bike to raise the handle bars? I test road the 17 Roubaix and liked it. Just not sure the price is worth it if I just need to change my fit. Plus my Trek is lighter and I like the quick handling.
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Old 05-18-17, 10:02 AM
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What is the difference between a road race and endurance/gran fondo bike?

Relaxed geometries generally have taller headtubes and more slack seattube angles. Meaning you sit a bit lower and your hands are a bit higher resulting in a more "upright" riding position.

Look at the difference between a "road" bike and a "tri" bike. Now imagine the same difference between a normal "road" bike and a "relaxed" bike.

It is NOT just changing the stem.

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Old 05-18-17, 10:13 AM
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And to add to the above post, reach is shorter.
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Old 05-18-17, 10:19 AM
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It can't hurt to try, esp if you like what you have. A riser is cheap, you may need longer brake and/or derailleur cables, that can add to the cost. I've done it for several people, most liked it and kept their bike for at least a few years. If you haven't ridden in several years, why blow $4K on a new bike before you know what you want?
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Old 05-18-17, 10:19 AM
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Some bikes can be fitted with spacers and/or and up-angled stem and work just as well. Whether you can add spacers depends on how short your fork's steerer tube was cut. An up-angled stem can always be added, and the stem length can vary .... no guarantee this will solve the problem but no reasons it can't.

I am shocked that the guy who makes a living selling bikes thinks the best solution is you buying a bike.
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Old 05-18-17, 10:27 AM
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Stem riser, they have cheap version on ebay for ~$8:
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Old 05-18-17, 10:30 AM
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^ Good call.
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Old 05-18-17, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
Stem riser, they have cheap version on ebay for ~$8:
Absolutely worth a try. They're ugly (in my opinion) but they work for a lot of people. I was just commenting in the first post that the guy selling bikes wasn't making crap up. There IS a difference in endurance geometry vs. typical road race geometry. And typically, the endurance bike will be more comfortable. The stem extender is a band aid that may or may not solve the problem.
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Old 05-18-17, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
...The stem extender is a band aid that may or may not solve the problem.
Having actual experience with stem riser, both personal friends and when I was an LBS mechanic, they are very successful. I have added them in the exact circumstance OP has, old bike, old age creakiness, they want to keep their existing bike. OP even stated he likes his bike's geometry and prefers over the endurance bike he test rode. "Band aid" are the words of a bike salesman....
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Old 05-18-17, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
Having actual experience with stem riser, both personal friends and when I was an LBS mechanic, they are very successful. I have added them in the exact circumstance OP has, old bike, old age creakiness, they want to keep their existing bike. OP even stated he likes his bike's geometry and prefers over the endurance bike he test rode. "Band aid" are the words of a bike salesman....
I think you and I are reading the OP wrong.

He said he liked the way the endurance bike fit and rode, but likes his bike's handling (and lightness) better.

We always say that "fit is king" so I always suggest riding the bike that fits best or deal with the consequences.

There's no need to spend multi thousand dollars to get a decent endurance road bike.

What the OP is trying to do is take an old aggressive RACE bike and make it into a comfortable ROAD bike.

OP, if you want to spend less money, then just buy a relaxed geometry frame and swap the parts from the trek over onto it.
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Old 05-18-17, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH View Post
Having actual experience with stem riser, both personal friends and when I was an LBS mechanic, they are very successful. I have added them in the exact circumstance OP has, old bike, old age creakiness, they want to keep their existing bike. OP even stated he likes his bike's geometry and prefers over the endurance bike he test rode. "Band aid" are the words of a bike salesman....
I don't know what LBS is abusing them locally, but I see bikes that have 8 inch+ risers on them, and take a typical road/mountain bike to a point where the rider is in the beach cruiser position and the bars are so high they almost qualify as Ape Hangers.

And of course if you raise the handlebars on a quick handling bike, it starts to become less quick handling as you shift weight backwards.

Doing a more upright position on a bike that has a rigid back triangle is going to transfer more shock to the spine, possible negating the advantage of a more upright position.

Either way, the OP has very little to lose by trying it. If it does not work he is out the cost of the riser, not a big loss.
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Old 05-18-17, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by rgconner View Post
...If it does not work he is out the cost of the riser, not a big loss.
IMHO , this is the key point. OP hasn't ridden in several years, a stem riser is a cheap way to get back on the bike and see if he wants to continue. After he get sucked back in we can coach his inner N+1, this bike can be his "loaner bike"....
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Old 05-18-17, 11:13 AM
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One other option:

the Roubaix is a wide range of prices, from $1700 to $10000. I am presuming the OP is looking at the more reasonably priced models. ( Could be wrong, having googled the specs of a Trek 5500)

For that sort of money, I would suggest finding and talking to a local bike builder.
Using nonstandard geometry and selecting tubing based on what you require, a bike builder can build a frame that is quick handling and has a more upright position. Typically designed frames are for mass production and the "average" person. Fine tuning angles and lengths might result in a bike that fits better and has less compromises.

Now, you might have to sacrifice a little of one to get the other, but they should be able to help you refine that and it should be less of a compromise than your current bike vrs the Roubaix.

My personal custom bike is both nimble and century long ride comfortable.

Moving the current bike group set over (I mean, you got Dura-Ace now, if nothing is mechanically wrong with it, why change it?) if possible would put a custom frame closer to the price of even the lowest Roubaix, depending on the builder and options.
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Old 05-22-17, 07:10 AM
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Thanks for all the thoughts. Decided to get the 2017 Roubaix. I have not purchased a new roadbike in 15 years. Time for a change.
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Old 05-22-17, 11:41 AM
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I am getting on the older side as well and after I broke my ribs last summer I could not get comfortable on my SuperSix. I dropped the seat just a bit and flipped the stem with two spacers underneath and it made a huge difference. Like others have said, if you like what you have, try to make it work.
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