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Wheel Upgrade advice $200-$350 range

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Wheel Upgrade advice $200-$350 range

Old 05-22-17, 05:20 AM
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Esthetic
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Wheel Upgrade advice $200-$350 range

Hello all.

Looking advice or input hoping any kind of experience directly with them, durability or versed on the subject of rolling weight...can contribute as i lock in on one.


Fulcrum Racing 5 LG (1658g) $215

Fulcrum Quattro (non-LG ) $235 (1725g)
Campagnolo Scirocco 35 $235 (1725g)

Fulcrum Racing 3 2017(clincher, non-2way) $360 (1550g)
Campagnolo Zonda C17 2017 $360 (1596g)

The question is not which is lightest, as i know that belongs the latter 2. I'm just unsure if the weigh differences matter here , or if i should concern myself more with a stouter wheel, cosmetics, save my money, etc..

I'm 5'9 and 200lbs, but as a mesomorph with a square frame and good muscle memory i've had trouble losing weight so realistically can't see ever being below the 185-200lbs range. Spitting image of my father, who at 61 and active still packs 190lbs at 5'7. I just got back into riding (i love it!!) after being out of cardio shape and not eating well.

Now my question is at this kind of riding weight and for what all intents and purposes is a training bike:

2009 Trek 1.5 Triple, recently acquired.



Will the difference between 3.8lbs on the Quattro's matter from 3.4lbs on the Racing 3's feel quantifiable?

The stock Bontrager SSR's are in the 21xxg /4.7lb range, quite heavy and so i'm expecting any wheel in this list will feel livelier. I can't justify any more expensive wheels on this old bike, but plans are to have it for years.

They are to be mounted with already purchased 28c Schwalbe One Folding Clinchers.


Aesthetically i find the Quattro's and Racing 3's the most attractive for the bike, with some curiosity on the mild Aero profile on the Quattro, but as you see there is that 175 Gram/$130 difference from the other pack. People speak highly of the Campy's as well, and they have that handmade quality and signature spoke profile going for them too.

What say you?

Thanks

Esthetic

Last edited by Esthetic; 05-22-17 at 05:33 AM.
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Old 05-22-17, 06:51 AM
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Fulcrum is a Campagnolo sub brand, so all the wheels you are looking at are made by Campagnolo. At the same price point, a Fulcrum or a Campagnolo wheel are very similar. When I worked for a bike distributor, we used to spec Zondas for heavier riders
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Old 05-22-17, 07:04 AM
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I can't comment specifically on those wheels but I do have a couple of general comments to make:

With regard to the wheels, modern wheels are hugely impressive. I bought a pair of Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels quite a few years ago now and they've done a lot of miles (I think around 10,000) without even needing to be trued. They've even survived a couple of moderately heavy thumps without giving an inch, and I'd be surprised if the wheels in your list didn't have similar longevity.

With regard to your weight, I wouldn't be too quick to say you can't see yourself getting below x. I struggled for years with my weight. I'm 6ft and for many years my weight seemed to go only in one direction (the wrong one) in spite of everything I did. Last year, when it got over 198lbs, I did some investigation and decided to change tack. There were three things I did which made a difference:

1. Restricted time eating: I used to eat breakfast at about 6 am before heading off to work and eat dinner around 7 pm when I got home. Restricted time eating means you limit all your eating to a 10 or 12 hour window, so I now have my breakfast at work at around 9 am and try not to eat late in the evening.

2. Restrict carbs: This requires some courage because there's so much advice out there telling you to eat carbs. But the first thing your body does with carbs is turn it into sugar and that's not good. Reduce the amount of bread, rice, pasta and potatoes you eat and replace it with healthy fats. Avoid fizzy drinks and be careful about how much fruit you eat - better to load up on veg rather than fruit.

3. Up the amount of cycling: Numbers 1 and 2 finally saw my weight going slowly in the right direction, which never happened before purely with a change of diet. I started that regime in February and had lost about 8 lbs by the beginning of May. My normal regime included six miles of cycling most days which is 1 mile to the station, train to London and then two miles to work, then the same in reverse. At the start of May I began cycling all the way to work (36 miles round trip) one day a week, gradually upping that to three days per week. By November I had lost a further 24 lbs. Unfortunately in November I then got glandular fever which rather put a stop to my cycling for a time and has seen me gain back 10 lbs, but I know I can lose that again quickly this year - not something I've ever had confidence about before. I had my 60th birthday in November and I just wish I'd learned all this years ago.

Best of luck

John
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Old 05-22-17, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
I can't comment specifically on those wheels but I do have a couple of general comments to make:

With regard to the wheels, modern wheels are hugely impressive. I bought a pair of Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels quite a few years ago now and they've done a lot of miles (I think around 10,000) without even needing to be trued. They've even survived a couple of moderately heavy thumps without giving an inch, and I'd be surprised if the wheels in your list didn't have similar longevity.

With regard to your weight, I wouldn't be too quick to say you can't see yourself getting below x. I struggled for years with my weight. I'm 6ft and for many years my weight seemed to go only in one direction (the wrong one) in spite of everything I did. Last year, when it got over 198lbs, I did some investigation and decided to change tack. There were three things I did which made a difference:

1. Restricted time eating: I used to eat breakfast at about 6 am before heading off to work and eat dinner around 7 pm when I got home. Restricted time eating means you limit all your eating to a 10 or 12 hour window, so I now have my breakfast at work at around 9 am and try not to eat late in the evening.

2. Restrict carbs: This requires some courage because there's so much advice out there telling you to eat carbs. But the first thing your body does with carbs is turn it into sugar and that's not good. Reduce the amount of bread, rice, pasta and potatoes you eat and replace it with healthy fats. Avoid fizzy drinks and be careful about how much fruit you eat - better to load up on veg rather than fruit.

3. Up the amount of cycling: Numbers 1 and 2 finally saw my weight going slowly in the right direction, which never happened before purely with a change of diet. I started that regime in February and had lost about 8 lbs by the beginning of May. My normal regime included six miles of cycling most days which is 1 mile to the station, train to London and then two miles to work, then the same in reverse. At the start of May I began cycling all the way to work (36 miles round trip) one day a week, gradually upping that to three days per week. By November I had lost a further 24 lbs. Unfortunately in November I then got glandular fever which rather put a stop to my cycling for a time and has seen me gain back 10 lbs, but I know I can lose that again quickly this year - not something I've ever had confidence about before. I had my 60th birthday in November and I just wish I'd learned all this years ago.

Best of luck

John

Thank you John for the words of encouragement and your story

You are right that these modern wheels should provide years and miles upon miles of service. I've heard great things about Mavics as well.
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Old 05-22-17, 08:07 AM
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Of your listed choices I would recommend the Fulcrum racing3s. Relatively light for an alloy wheel and will likely be very durable. I've had great luck with Fulcrum for training wheels. And going uphill every gram counts.
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Old 05-22-17, 08:09 AM
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I'd go with the Zonda C17s. Yes,they are the most expensive on your list.

I have the non-LG Quattros, and while they are a nice upgrade, their actual weight is heavier than the quoted (which seems to be consistent, I've seen it noted elsewhere), and the wider Zonda rim will be a little more aero and comfortable with the tire patch.

You won't have any worries regarding rider weight with any of these.

Fulcrum is made by Campy (noted here already). In the same price range are Shimano Ultegras which are also great wheels and come in at 1640g) Shimano Ultegra WH-6800 Road Wheelset

And a hey, shiny thing! option: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0116Q6Z6E?psc=1
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Old 05-22-17, 08:20 AM
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Hello,

I am 5'8 @ 190. I am 56 and starting biking a couple years ago. Check out the Vuelta Corsa SLX (NOT THE Lites). They have served me well for about 3000 miles. I have lost 140 pounds. Biking has been a huge help, but diet matters as well.

Best wishes,
Chip
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Old 05-22-17, 08:53 AM
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ProBike kit has a 16% off 1hr firesale...going to have to pull the trigger!! Savings are too good.
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Old 05-22-17, 10:12 AM
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Can't help much, but I will point out that I put 8-10k onto my SSR's before the second spoke broke and I retired them. I'm 180 and live in a somewhat hilly area, have stood on many a hill to climb--and I was probably closer to 190lb when I first started riding on the SSR's. I'm not sure if you are trying to replace the SSR's before they break, or you just want better wheels--I just want to point out, they won't taco on your first ride. I picked up a set of WH-500's a few years ago "just in case" and they sat for a long time before I pulled the plug on the SSR's (which I kept for backup).

I will say I got much more bang out of my buck getting rid of the Bontrager hardcase tires and going to Conti 4000's.

Just saw your last post--if they're on sale, then why not? I'd love to have a lighter bike in the hills...
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Old 05-22-17, 10:42 AM
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which ones, which ones?
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Old 05-22-17, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by supton View Post
Can't help much, but I will point out that I put 8-10k onto my SSR's before the second spoke broke and I retired them. I'm 180 and live in a somewhat hilly area, have stood on many a hill to climb--and I was probably closer to 190lb when I first started riding on the SSR's. I'm not sure if you are trying to replace the SSR's before they break, or you just want better wheels--I just want to point out, they won't taco on your first ride. I picked up a set of WH-500's a few years ago "just in case" and they sat for a long time before I pulled the plug on the SSR's (which I kept for backup).

I will say I got much more bang out of my buck getting rid of the Bontrager hardcase tires and going to Conti 4000's.

Just saw your last post--if they're on sale, then why not? I'd love to have a lighter bike in the hills...
You are right! They are actually really stout!

Some backround on the bike:

I actually just bought this bike weeks ago for $200, and put around 100mi since. Loving it.

So relatively low investment to start road biking, and the bike is mechanically sound!! Its an '09 though, so prior owner had pretty much spent the Bont Select tires, seat worn to crap, bar tape falling off etc...wheels are still sound.

So first things first threw a new saddle on there, i have some new red SRAM tape arriving on Wednesday as well as the Schwalbe One Folding 28's....then i started researching online and found that the Bontrager SSR's are around 2100g-2300g+ with tires...and seeing the cost and weight reduction of the Racing 5's i started this journey and the idea of having all new wheels and tires (as the other things) would add to that new-to me feel. The bike frame as you can see is no dog for an '09.

So yeah, i dont mind keeping the SSR's and whats left of the 25's on it for the cold weather months. We do have our share of hills and inclines even in our suburb rides, and the upcoming local event in Sept. i'm training for will have their share to conquer. The idea of the nicer wheels is also that you can put it on the next bike.

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Old 05-22-17, 12:23 PM
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If you ask me, the best set of alloy rims you can get under $1k is a set of Ultegra WH-6800. Why? No spoke holes in the rim bed. They are road tubeless ready and can be had from Jensen, Chain Reaction, etc. for around $320 - $380 on sale quite frequently. I believe they normally MSRP for around $600.

You will thank me later in that you no longer have to buy tubes or fix 99% of the flats road cyclists encounter. And will feel the supple quality of running 75-85 psi instead of the ridiculous 100-120psi run by roadies for years on road clinchers.
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Old 05-22-17, 12:28 PM
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They seem stout, but I popped two ND spokes just the same. I bought three when the first went (I asked for two, was charged for two, but they cut me three by accident). Just a heads up, might want some spares. IIRC my wheels were just shy of 2kg (sans tires) when I checked... or about 100g heavier than the WH-R500's I replaced them with. Too bad the R500's are more noisy! I might have to go back.

Can't go wrong with spare wheels around.
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Old 05-22-17, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by cellery View Post
You will thank me later in that you no longer have to buy tubes or fix 99% of the flats road cyclists encounter. And will feel the supple quality of running 75-85 psi instead of the ridiculous 100-120psi run by roadies for years on road clinchers.
not taking anything away from going tubeless, but for what it's worth: I'm 185-190lbs and regularly run my tubed 25mm Tufos at ~83psi front, ~85psi rear. Don't have to be tubeless to run a lower pressure, just some willingness.
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Old 05-22-17, 01:56 PM
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I'm 180 and would run 90psi on my 25mm tires. Routinely down to 60psi, as I'm a bit lazy on the whole checking before I go out. I flatted recently and came back on on 38psi (got tired of working the stupidly undersized lightweight pump), and that was a bit too low.

Ironically the only times I've flatted is at 90 or 100psi, right after pumping up. Hit a sharp edge of pavement just right, and pinch flat. After all these miles I'm thinking it is just a matter of "when it's your time, it's your time".

Trying out 28mm tires on one bike. Unsure at the moment--I dislike having to let air out before removing the front wheel. 25's will sneak between the pads.
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Old 05-22-17, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by superdex View Post
not taking anything away from going tubeless, but for what it's worth: I'm 185-190lbs and regularly run my tubed 25mm Tufos at ~83psi front, ~85psi rear. Don't have to be tubeless to run a lower pressure, just some willingness.
Which Tufos? Their tubulars are actually tubeless
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Old 05-22-17, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
Which Tufos? Their tubulars are actually tubeless
Tufo Callibra 25 clinchers. And before that I ran Michelins at the same pressure. Not a tire-specific thing
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Old 05-22-17, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by superdex View Post
Tufo Callibra 25 clinchers. And before that I ran Michelins at the same pressure. Not a tire-specific thing
Thought so, but was curious. Tufo clinchers are a recent development in their tire line
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Old 05-22-17, 02:45 PM
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I like them a lot, incidentally. Seem to be wearing well and ride nicely... 25mm on my non-LG Fulcrum Quattros (20mm wide) measure about 26mm...
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Old 05-22-17, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by superdex View Post
which ones, which ones?
I don't want to jinx it!!!!

Seriously, couldn't tell you how many times i'd had the rug swept from under me on a slickdeal and order cancelled.

Waiting on my money's to be charged and a processing/shipping confirmation first, because i could be back to square one...hehe
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Old 05-22-17, 06:23 PM
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? from PBK? They're pretty legit. The goods are on their way, for sure. (I think that's where I bought my Quattros, actually, among various other things over the years...)
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Old 05-23-17, 07:36 AM
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Yes PBK.

The Racing 3's were not available in Shimano hub, they were my first inclination as they match the bike nicely. Ordered the Campagnolo Zonda C17's though.

I just couldn't pass up the savings on the more expensive sets, they came out to $318 with $40 off.

As i was putting new bar tape on last night was starting to realize just how much nicer the Quattros would've matched . I'm sure the Campy's would look clean, but the Quattro's are almost made for this Trek.

I've been going back and forth with someone on CL over my dream road bike (since before i bought the Trek) , a 2012 Specialized Tarmac Apex Mid Compact all carbon...a mouthful for sure. If i end up with that bike at the price i want its nice to know the Zonda's would make way onto it quite nicely, and i have an excuse then to buy the Quattro's down the road for the Trek.
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Old 05-23-17, 09:03 AM
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nice work!

Pics are required when you get them all mounted up

(here is how my Quattros look)
Attached Images
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javelin boca.jpg (98.1 KB, 132 views)

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Old 06-19-17, 12:58 PM
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@Esthetic, which wheelset did you end up getting? I just pulled the trigger on the Campagnolo Zonda C17. Was $314 from probikekit.co.uk with the $30 off coupon (SAVESAS). Original price was good but this helped. Also will help in case I get whacked at customs for it. First time owning these wheels for me. Will see how they fare. Interesting that they don't have any spoke holes on the inside. They call it "momag" and it sounds like it might be a PITA for the wheelbuilders to have to use a magnet to get the nips into place. But no more rim strips.

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Old 06-20-17, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Esthetic View Post
Hello all.

Looking advice or input hoping any kind of experience directly with them, durability or versed on the subject of rolling weight...can contribute as i lock in on one.


Fulcrum Racing 5 LG (1658g) $215

Fulcrum Quattro (non-LG ) $235 (1725g)
Campagnolo Scirocco 35 $235 (1725g)

Fulcrum Racing 3 2017(clincher, non-2way) $360 (1550g)
Campagnolo Zonda C17 2017 $360 (1596g)

The question is not which is lightest, as i know that belongs the latter 2. I'm just unsure if the weigh differences matter here , or if i should concern myself more with a stouter wheel, cosmetics, save my money, etc..

I'm 5'9 and 200lbs, but as a mesomorph with a square frame and good muscle memory i've had trouble losing weight so realistically can't see ever being below the 185-200lbs range. Spitting image of my father, who at 61 and active still packs 190lbs at 5'7. I just got back into riding (i love it!!) after being out of cardio shape and not eating well.

Now my question is at this kind of riding weight and for what all intents and purposes is a training bike:

2009 Trek 1.5 Triple, recently acquired.



Will the difference between 3.8lbs on the Quattro's matter from 3.4lbs on the Racing 3's feel quantifiable?

The stock Bontrager SSR's are in the 21xxg /4.7lb range, quite heavy and so i'm expecting any wheel in this list will feel livelier. I can't justify any more expensive wheels on this old bike, but plans are to have it for years.

They are to be mounted with already purchased 28c Schwalbe One Folding Clinchers.


Aesthetically i find the Quattro's and Racing 3's the most attractive for the bike, with some curiosity on the mild Aero profile on the Quattro, but as you see there is that 175 Gram/$130 difference from the other pack. People speak highly of the Campy's as well, and they have that handmade quality and signature spoke profile going for them too.

What say you?

Thanks

Esthetic
I have nearly the same bike...1.5 with a double. I put mavic open pros paired with a 105 hub on it, and some 25 Rubino Pro tires. It made a world of difference. Rolled easier and absorbed pavement imperfections so much nicer. Any will be a huge improvement over the stock wheels.
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