Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Bike tires and slow times

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Bike tires and slow times

Old 06-25-17, 09:25 PM
  #1  
nasabiker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bike tires and slow times

So my bike and myself are are one the heavy side. I weigh about 245 lbs and the bike all done up about 30lbs.
It was originally set up for year round commuting in hilly west Virginia so my tires are 28mm schwalbe marathon supremes. While i love the trouble free miles, im wondering if switching to something like a 30 to 33mm panaracer pasela might be a faster more comfortable ride.
Would the consensus be that i would be reasonably faster than my current setup or not?

Thank in advance!
nasabiker is offline  
Old 06-25-17, 09:51 PM
  #2  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,293

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 187 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3960 Post(s)
Liked 1,722 Times in 1,107 Posts
You might actually do better going the opposite direction -- fatter but lighter tires. If your bike frame and brakes can handle it.

A friend went with Schwalbe Big Ones on his bike and loves 'em. They're designed for beach racing. The main drawback may be minimal puncture protection. But they're lightweight for 29x2.35" tires (under 500 g). And they'll probably handle rough chipseal and comparably awful rural pavement better than some skinny tires. Rolling Resistance tests show the Big Ones roll like the better skinny road bike tires.

I was doubtful about the claims that bigger but lightweight fast rolling tires could be that good. But three weeks ago I got my first road bike in 40 years (a 24 lb Centurion Ironman with 700x23 tires) after riding upright hybrids the past couple of years. And I cannot consistently beat my best times achieved riding the lighter of the two hybrids (a Univega, just under 30 lbs with 1-1/2" riser bars) wearing 700x42 Continental Speed Rides.

Assuming a neutral or otherwise comparable wind condition, the upright hybrid with fatter, lightweight, fast rolling tires is as fast as the road bike or faster, and far more comfortable on rough chipseal. My road bike times are consistently faster only when headwinds are a factor.

As a result, I'm going to try somewhat lower bars on the hybrid (possibly flipped albatross or North Roads bars -- I don't want to give up my comfort), and somewhat fatter, better rated 700x25 or 700x28 tires on the road bike and compare again throughout the year.

BTW, if your bike can't handle the rather large Schwalbe Big Ones, do consider the Continental Speed Rides (700x42 nominal, actually closer to 38 wide, 430-495 g depending on bead type) or the essentially identical but narrower Continental Cyclocross Speed (700x35 nominal, possibly a bit narrower, weight around 400 g depending on bead type).

I'm really satisfied with the Speed Rides. The ride is very comfortable despite the unimpressive TPI. I weigh 160 and usually ride 'em at 50-60 psi, depending on road conditions. The shallow file tread grips like Velcro on tricky stuff yet never feels sluggish or like you're fighting with the bike. I'm assuming the lighter weight Cyclocross Speed tires will be even better, although pricier.
canklecat is offline  
Old 06-25-17, 09:53 PM
  #3  
drlogik 
Senior Member
 
drlogik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,183

Bikes: '87-ish Pinarello Montello; '89 Nishiki Ariel; '85 Raleigh Wyoming, '16 Wabi Special, '16 Wabi Classic, '14 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 68 Times in 50 Posts
I ride 28's and 30's. I don't notice too much of a difference but the 28's I have are not quite as smooth as the 30's. Smooth usually equates to faster too. Both sets of my tires are Challenge open tubulars. 28's are Paris Roubaix's and the 30's are Strada Biancha's. I also run latex tubes in both sets of tires. The 30's truly do float over rough road like a cloud. Amazing actually.

Keep in mind that your forks and brakes need to be able to handle the wider width if you go with 30's or larger. If they are marginal then I'd advise sticking with what you have. You don't want tight fitting tires going through your fork or brake calipers.


-

Last edited by drlogik; 06-25-17 at 09:57 PM.
drlogik is offline  
Old 06-25-17, 10:12 PM
  #4  
nasabiker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Im definitely gonna check out those speed rides. As far as max size i could fit. It would probably be around 45mm. The bike is an adventure type bike with 90mm drum brakes front and 70mm rear so they do not limit max size at all
nasabiker is offline  
Old 06-26-17, 04:02 AM
  #5  
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 8,322

Bikes: Vintage steel, aluminum, modern carbon disc, single speed, MTB's, the works

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2006 Post(s)
Liked 79 Times in 48 Posts
I read the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 32's actually measure out to less than 31c. Not all tires run true to size. If you have a micrometer you can measure yours. You could check out a tire like the Rivendell Jack Brown 33.3c.
Lazyass is offline  
Old 06-26-17, 04:20 AM
  #6  
deapee
Ride On!
 
deapee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 971

Bikes: Allez DSW SL Sprint | Fuji Cross

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by nasabiker View Post
So my bike and myself are are one the heavy side. I weigh about 245 lbs and the bike all done up about 30lbs.
It was originally set up for year round commuting in hilly west Virginia so my tires are 28mm schwalbe marathon supremes. While i love the trouble free miles, im wondering if switching to something like a 30 to 33mm panaracer pasela might be a faster more comfortable ride.
Would the consensus be that i would be reasonably faster than my current setup or not?

Thank in advance!
So switching to a 33mm tire will absolutely be a more comfortable ride than your 28's.
But, it should not be noticeably faster whatsoever - your marathon supremes are not why your bike is slow.
deapee is offline  
Old 06-26-17, 09:09 AM
  #7  
jeffpoulin 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,296
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Lazyass View Post
I read the Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 32's actually measure out to less than 31c. Not all tires run true to size. If you have a micrometer you can measure yours. You could check out a tire like the Rivendell Jack Brown 33.3c.
Not mine. I have 4 sets of Marathon Supreme 700x32 purchased between 2010 and 2016. The older sets have stretched a bit and now measure 34mm wide. The newest set was 31mm when new, but is currently 32mm after 1 year of use. In a few years, I expect these to stretch to 33-34mm as well.
jeffpoulin is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
afbengochea
Bicycle Mechanics
12
04-15-13 05:38 PM
ROJA
Commuting
73
03-13-12 11:36 AM
mooserat
Bicycle Mechanics
28
06-27-11 04:32 PM
cycle2
Hybrid Bicycles
38
05-23-11 07:58 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.